Author Topic: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.  (Read 41745 times)

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Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #775 on: January 16, 2023, 09:25:50 pm »
Interesting stuff.  It's instrumentation we're not used to hearing, and then even within the limited key, there is at least some contra-melody in there to keep it interesting at least for a bit.

I'd imagine it would lose some of its appeal if you listened to a lot of it, which is probably why more complex stuff developed.


Yes indeed,  But instead of complexity, musical styles seem to ebb and flow with mood of the listener.  Perhaps the apex of all music history is the late 18th Century, early 19th Century.  Almost in tandem Mozart and Beethoven created almost unversially acclaimed,  the greatest music ever composed from about 1770-1827. 

Mozart strangely led most of his life in anonymity, while Beethoven was a rock star of his era.  But both in most of the 1st half 1th century dominated orchestra and concert hall agendas.  But by the later half of the 19th century, you saw a signifcantly more focus of compostion toward folk and ethnic tinged works.  Offenbach's Orpheus "Can Can" (1858)  is just one example.  One can not hear that piece without thinking France. That transveresed elsewhere in Europe with other composers. (Sans. Schultz)

And again, I think the simplyfying of the orchestra sounds were more around rebuking the central European Pomp, Pretentious, and ostentation of that era.

Fast foward to our lifetimes, we saw very complex and intricate jazz turn into depression era folk, we saw prog art rock arguably devolve to punk.  And ultimately everything into what may be the only music ever of no redeeming quality......  Rap.
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Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #776 on: January 19, 2023, 03:11:22 pm »
Classic Rock Album of the Day- Emerson Lake and Palmer- Pictures at an Exhibition (1971)

From the last few posts, you might have noticed that my guilty musical pleasure is Classical Music.  Which honestly augments well with my favorite musical genre, Prog Rock.  No one in the prog area did classical better than ELP.  And though no one can claim ELP was the greatest band of all time, there can be arguments made that as a conglomerate they were the greatest musicans of all.

ELP has a limited fan base due to the their tendency to be ostentatious in the nature of the complexity of their music, or their tendency of focusing on the widzardry rather than content.  Admittedly more than 75% of Tarkus was unlistenable as mumble jumble synthezizer goobly goop.  Incredible musicanship, but head ache inducing.  Pass on that particular album unless you area hard core ELP fan.

I am including this one for the fact that this is the one single album that introduced me to the Prog genre.  And what Keith Emerson did in his interpreation of this Mussgorsky 19th Century classic is amazing.  All tracks ex. 6, 12, and 13 are from the classical piece.
What I particularly love about this album is Emerson infusion of Church Organ.  Which, by the way when used in the best acoustic conditons and setting is the most beautiful, hair raising, and chlling musical sound on earth.

Saddens be that 2/3 of this band are dead, but their legacy and greatness lives forever in the albums like this one, their Self Titled, and Brain Salad Surgery.  Enjoy......


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7NAGTq_IJQ
« Last Edit: January 19, 2023, 03:14:08 pm by catfish1957 »
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Offline Hoodat

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #777 on: January 19, 2023, 03:56:32 pm »
Nut Rocker


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Offline berdie

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #778 on: January 19, 2023, 08:50:09 pm »
Just out of curiosity, what is the opinion of the "other" ELP: Emerson, Lake and Powell?

Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #779 on: January 19, 2023, 09:23:30 pm »
Just out of curiosity, what is the opinion of the "other" ELP: Emerson, Lake and Powell?

Had honestly about forgoten about this iteneration of ELP.

Powell, (just IMO) was more a session man, than a core player.  Still that does not undersocre a sigificant resume that included many huge acts of the time.  Then add the fact Palmer was (again, my opinion) a top 4 rock drummer of all time that is included in the list with Peart, Bohnam, and Moon.   Still, I do understand that there are many out there who look at Cozy Powell as a technical equal.

OTOH, Powell's style typically fit better with a hard rock sound than prog.  It all boils down to taste.

As far as comparing the embodied work, I had to look it up, found that he Powell version of ELP only had one studio LP in 1986.  I remember listening to it long long ago, and loved Emerson's rendition of Gustav's Planets.  But overall the feel of the LP was weak vs. earlier Emerson Lake and Palmer classics.  Not Emerson's best songwriting effort.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2023, 09:24:42 pm by catfish1957 »
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Offline berdie

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #780 on: January 19, 2023, 09:44:40 pm »
Had honestly about forgoten about this iteneration of ELP.

Powell, (just IMO) was more a session man, than a core player.  Still that does not undersocre a sigificant resume that included many huge acts of the time.  Then add the fact Palmer was (again, my opinion) a top 4 rock drummer of all time that is included in the list with Peart, Bohnam, and Moon.   Still, I do understand that there are many out there who look at Cozy Powell as a technical equal.

OTOH, Powell's style typically fit better with a hard rock sound than prog.  It all boils down to taste.

As far as comparing the embodied work, I had to look it up, found that he Powell version of ELP only had one studio LP in 1986.  I remember listening to it long long ago, and loved Emerson's rendition of Gustav's Planets.  But overall the feel of the LP was weak vs. earlier Emerson Lake and Palmer classics.  Not Emerson's best songwriting effort.


Thanks for your reply @catfish1957 . You are very knowledgeable. I like both. But to me, at least, the Powell inclusion had a more "pop" sound. But...they did a bang up job f 8 Miles High. The Palmer version was far more ethereal for the most part.

Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #781 on: January 20, 2023, 12:19:25 am »
RIP David Crosby (1941-2023) died today at age 81.

Member of the Byrds (early) and later Crosby Stills, Nash, (And Young) were a huge folk/rock presence in the late 1960's that were characterized by finely crafted harmonies and the formula hippy themes of the day.  Upper bill and draw at Monterry, Woodstock and other festivals. 

From our sde of the pond, he definitely was a pioneer in the rock era.

From a musical perspective (non-lyric) this is probably his best and well known contribution....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Q3j-i7GLr0
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Offline Hoodat

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #782 on: January 20, 2023, 01:57:24 am »
Carry On


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Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #783 on: January 20, 2023, 02:18:57 am »

Thanks for your reply @catfish1957 . You are very knowledgeable. I like both. But to me, at least, the Powell inclusion had a more "pop" sound. But...they did a bang up job f 8 Miles High. The Palmer version was far more ethereal for the most part.


@berdie

Wow...

How danged spooky is that.  You mentioning a song by Crosby and the Byrds before it is announced Crosby died.

I've got goose pimples
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Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #784 on: January 20, 2023, 07:16:33 am »
Classic Rock Album of the Day- Jethro Tull- Aqualung- (1971)

Got a little inspiration the other day giving thought to how  Medevial music morphed and influenced latter day Baroque and Classical Periods, and ulitmately modern  music.    There really is only one rock band fits the bill and gives  homage to music's ancient roots.  That being Jethro Tull.  Early classical pre-Baroque obviously did not have the meter, and elements of this prog band, but here its so beautfully tinged that there is no mistaking  band leader Ian Anderson's intent. 

Did not realize that outside Anderson JT, had a very turbulant amount of personnel changes through their history which before the Casino Circuit variety (now) recorded basically 1967-2012.  And their true hay day was generally 1970-1980.   24 different players have been members on the band with Anderson, being the only constant. That flux has resulted in only those '70's classics only be desirable, except for the most rabit JT fan.  Again, I know some hard core fans of this band, and they are proably throwing darts at me right now.

It was a tough choice for me to pick which album I wanted to revirew.  For pure jam, and musicanship, Thick as a Brick (1972)  is the obvious choice.  But the hell breaking prog blast is truly lacking of hook, so the enjoyment is more aligned toward the fantastic solos and genre bending magic that happens.  Anderson splits hairs between Olde English Folk, and Jazz, then rock in mind blowing succession.   I liken Thick to Tarkus, minus the insane chaos.  Like Tarkus which was produced about the same time, are masterful muscians on top of their craft.  Just more madness to the method.. 

So instead, I'll go with the familar territory and popular choice of fans, Aqualung. Aqualung a year earlier, has more structure,  is more rocking, and had a few hits that most of us will easily recognize from the time.  In both, Anderson's flute work is spectacular.  I am not a fan of the  Flute, in Rock, but as far as JT is concerned it is what makes them unique.    This album is much easier to review, due to tanglible structure, vs. Thick which is like trying to critique a 20 minute of a Beethoven sonata, with all the hills and valleys.   So here goes....

Side 1-

Aqualung- Title track, and opens with one of the more recognizable opening riffs of the decade beside Smoke on the Water- Bizarre topic of the saga of a creepy old pedophile.  Kind of like a Biden troll I guess. Song nicley alternates between hav riffed matter, to bottom barrel-ish sounding folk.  Nice solo work at the end by entire band in great jam fashion.  Definitely one of my favorites by the band- 2

Cross Eyed any- Mysterious with wavering flute and strings, that progresses into a fabulous hooked rocker.  Actually heard this one on a classic rock station the other day.   Jethro Tulls Lives!!!! 4

Cheap Day Return- Short acoustical olde English numbered ditty-  Okay 9

Mother Goose- Anderson really turns on the renaissance aspect of the catalog.  This tune would feel right  at home in 1500.  Works well though. 6

Wond'ring Out Loud- Another folk acoustical tune.  How the band works the strings (or innovative mellotron)  in, makes its very pleasing. 7

Up to Me- Grabs you from iconic starting laugh.  This searing rocker adds a hook that is effectively added up later and with variation later in the LP, in unforgettable fahion. 5

Side 2-

My God- Almost a blues number.  Almost a jazz number, then almost a rocker.  Anderson's schizophrenic styles intertwining are a fascinating journey into a really talented and intelligent band.  Andreson's best flute solo on the LP.  8

Hymn 43- Man, I love this tune- Epic, unique bass/drum line.  Majestic, and maybe the most prog feeling, in style and delivery. Highly identifiable due to air play, and if  any have knowledge of Tull, you will remember it well- 1

Slipstream- Another brieg folky olde-English that doesn't quite work into the equation as well.  I don't claim to understand the concept in this particular part.  I'll defer that  to the  hard core fans.  11

Locomotive Breath- 3rd highly identifiable tune on this LP , that flat out rocks.  Dueling guitar and flute is legendary on this one.
3

Wind Up-  A mostly rocking end, but suprisingly weak versus the balance of what is a classic prog concept album, during the infancy of the genre. 10



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MslaxkQpTdI

« Last Edit: January 20, 2023, 02:39:17 pm by catfish1957 »
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Offline Hoodat

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #785 on: January 20, 2023, 02:13:48 pm »
Aqualung - Live '77


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Offline Maj. Bill Martin

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #786 on: January 20, 2023, 11:42:44 pm »
Classic Rock Album of the Day- Emerson Lake and Palmer- Pictures at an Exhibition (1971)

From the last few posts, you might have noticed that my guilty musical pleasure is Classical Music.  Which honestly augments well with my favorite musical genre, Prog Rock.  No one in the prog area did classical better than ELP.  And though no one can claim ELP was the greatest band of all time, there can be arguments made that as a conglomerate they were the greatest musicans of all.

ELP has a limited fan base due to the their tendency to be ostentatious in the nature of the complexity of their music, or their tendency of focusing on the widzardry rather than content.  Admittedly more than 75% of Tarkus was unlistenable as mumble jumble synthezizer goobly goop.  Incredible musicanship, but head ache inducing.  Pass on that particular album unless you area hard core ELP fan.

I am including this one for the fact that this is the one single album that introduced me to the Prog genre.  And what Keith Emerson did in his interpreation of this Mussgorsky 19th Century classic is amazing.  All tracks ex. 6, 12, and 13 are from the classical piece.
What I particularly love about this album is Emerson infusion of Church Organ.  Which, by the way when used in the best acoustic conditons and setting is the most beautiful, hair raising, and chlling musical sound on earth.

Saddens be that 2/3 of this band are dead, but their legacy and greatness lives forever in the albums like this one, their Self Titled, and Brain Salad Surgery.  Enjoy......


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7NAGTq_IJQ

Ha!  A friend introducing me to Tarkus is what got me into prog rock. 

I've gone back and forth on Pictures.   Some of it, like "The Gnome", is kind of Tarkus-esque in terms of that kind of noodling-around sound.  But other parts are just great - Great Gate of Kiev in particular really works - fantastic vocals by Lake on that one.

ELP was my favorite band for awhile, then I kind of drifted into King Crimson, then Yes, Genesis, etc..  Lots of cross-pollination between those bands.

I've heard criticisms from drummers that Palmer is kind of "sloppy", but I will say that he did the best drum solos I've ever seen, and it wasn't particularly close.  Incredie showman .
« Last Edit: January 20, 2023, 11:50:02 pm by Maj. Bill Martin »

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #787 on: January 20, 2023, 11:47:25 pm »
Aqualung is a great album.  I actually liked the band better live - they were heavier than on the albums and could really rock out.

I go hot and cold on Ian Anderson's vocals.  I don't like vocal "runs", where someone fits 5 notes into a single syllable, and Anderson goes overboard with that sometimes.  When he sings more "straight", he has a really good baritone voice.

You mentioned orchestral rock.  Renaissance did that fairly well also, and did a fair number of classical adaptations.   Annie Haslam's vocal range was ridiculous, and there was some really good piano/bass work in the band itself, though they did a lot of concerts with orchestra accompaniment.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2023, 11:48:29 pm by Maj. Bill Martin »

Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #788 on: January 21, 2023, 04:19:51 am »
Aqualung is a great album.  I actually liked the band better live - they were heavier than on the albums and could really rock out.

I go hot and cold on Ian Anderson's vocals.  I don't like vocal "runs", where someone fits 5 notes into a single syllable, and Anderson goes overboard with that sometimes.  When he sings more "straight", he has a really good baritone voice.

You mentioned orchestral rock.  Renaissance did that fairly well also, and did a fair number of classical adaptations.   Annie Haslam's vocal range was ridiculous, and there was some really good piano/bass work in the band itself, though they did a lot of concerts with orchestra accompaniment.

Renaissance?  Wow Bill, I haven't heard that band mentioned in decades.  I had a few friends that were into them, just as Tull.  In style, they kind of go hand in hand.  I am going back to listen to them to see what I remember about them. 

What is your preference between Aqualung and Thick as a Brick.  I almost chose Thick as a Brick to review, but was at kind of at loss to explain the dynamics of the work.  Artistically, its superior, but Aqualung as a whole is a better listen, and I thought more here would remember the LP better.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2023, 08:48:19 am by catfish1957 »
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Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #789 on: January 21, 2023, 04:32:08 am »
Ha!  A friend introducing me to Tarkus is what got me into prog rock. 

I've gone back and forth on Pictures.   Some of it, like "The Gnome", is kind of Tarkus-esque in terms of that kind of noodling-around sound.  But other parts are just great - Great Gate of Kiev in particular really works - fantastic vocals by Lake on that one.

ELP was my favorite band for awhile, then I kind of drifted into King Crimson, then Yes, Genesis, etc..  Lots of cross-pollination between those bands.

I've heard criticisms from drummers that Palmer is kind of "sloppy", but I will say that he did the best drum solos I've ever seen, and it wasn't particularly close.  Incredie showman .

If you are into Tarkus, you are truly a first rate ELP fan.  I have often said that Tarkus as a musical work, is the most complex and voluminous work ever done in the history of rock.  Emerson's keyboard work as far as "quickness" and "focused" was at its pinnacle.  And honestly, I don't see how anyone in the modern era could do it live, considering Emerson have the habit of accerlating the pace of his playing as the tune progressed.  But you got to admit....  Tarkus sure didn't have a commerical focus.

I haven't heard too many comments around Palmer being sloppy.  I know it is subjective, but I would rank him about 4th all time of rock drummers, behind (in no certain order) Peart, Bonham, and Moon.  One thing about Palmer that kind of escapes critics, is that if there was a sports like statistic  on drum stick head speed, I'd bet Carl Palmer would topping that list.  His liver performance at the California Jam in 1974 was incredible.  Solo starts about the 2:45 mark. But.... I do have to admit, BSS is my favorite LP of the band.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P19BpRijJD4
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Offline Maj. Bill Martin

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #790 on: January 21, 2023, 11:45:06 pm »
Renaissance?  Wow Bill, I haven't heard that band mentioned in decades.  I had a few friends that were into them, just as Tull.  In style, they kind of go hand in hand.  I am going back to listen to them to see what I remember about them. 

What is your preference between Aqualung and Thick as a Brick.  I almost chose to review, but was at kind of at loss to explain the dynamics of the work.  Artistically, its superior, but Aqualung as a whole is a better listen, and I thought more here would remember the LP better.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caIM8e5m4u8


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4VDwWVrHn4

She had a phenomenal voice, but it sometimes sounded too sanitized to me.

I agree with you on those two Tull albums.  I think Thick as a Brick is probably a bit more polished, but Aqualung has some better singles and rocks more.



« Last Edit: January 22, 2023, 12:13:36 am by Maj. Bill Martin »

Offline Maj. Bill Martin

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #791 on: January 21, 2023, 11:51:49 pm »
If you are into Tarkus, you are truly a first rate ELP fan.  I have often said that Tarkus as a musical work, is the most complex and voluminous work ever done in the history of rock.  Emerson's keyboard work as far as "quickness" and "focused" was at its pinnacle.  And honestly, I don't see how anyone in the modern era could do it live, considering Emerson have the habit of accerlating the pace of his playing as the tune progressed.  But you got to admit....  Tarkus sure didn't have a commerical focus.

I haven't heard too many comments around Palmer being sloppy.  I know it is subjective, but I would rank him about 4th all time of rock drummers, behind (in no certain order) Peart, Bonham, and Moon.  One thing about Palmer that kind of escapes critics, is that if there was a sports like statistic  on drum stick head speed, I'd bet Carl Palmer would topping that list.  His liver performance at the California Jam in 1974 was incredible.  Solo starts about the 2:45 mark. But.... I do have to admit, BSS is my favorite LP of the band.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P19BpRijJD4

Tarkus clearly wasn't commercial sounding...but it went to No. 1 in the U.K. -- the only ELP album ever to do that -- and to No. 9 in the U.S..  In retrospect, that seems nuts.  But I think music fans in general were more adventurous back then.  No way DSOTM would have the same impact if it was released today.

I think Palmer wasn't the greatest at keeping a consistent tempo.  He was great at fills, and was very aggressive.  But I don't think he was great at hitting and staying in a "pocket", and doesn't really groove as well as someone like Phil Collins, and obviously not like Bonham or Peart.  Even with Asia, he ended up behind quite often despite obviously having the ability to play faster.  Didn't help with ELP that, as you said, Emerson wasn't always the greatest at keeping tempo either.  But on the flip side, that's kind of what happens when you're playing balls-out most of the time.  Those guys never took the easy way out, which is part of their appeal.  That clip from the California Jam kind of makes the point.  I think Palmer was the greatest "rock" drum soloist...but of course, doing a solo means that he was keeping his own time and not having to work within the band.

My opinion on Collins has risen over time.  He was just really good at juggling complex time signatures and then popping right back dead on the main rhythm.  Some of those older Genesis tunes are tough because of the way Gabriel's voice kind of floated around the music sometimes, but Phil kept them together.  Still a Bruford fan, but Collins gets overlooked sometimes as a pure drummer because of going pop and becoming a vocalist.

When you get up in the rarified air of great drummers, it's hard to rank them because they all bring something the others don't.   I'd put Palmer up there as a soloist, and Bonham up there to the extent you don't ask him to do odd time signatures,, which he disliked.  His work on Achilles Last Stand is just insane -- not sure anyone else could have done that.  Collins can play pretty much anything, but he isn't as inventive as Bruford, or as powerful as Bonham or Palmer.   And nobody keeps things tighter than Peart, although I couldn't see him doing some of the stuff Collins and particularly Bruford did.  But Bruford isn't really that good at playing something that isn't his own.  And Moon brings a violent unpredictability that is pretty unique.

« Last Edit: January 22, 2023, 12:15:05 am by Maj. Bill Martin »

Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #792 on: January 22, 2023, 04:27:11 pm »
Classic Rock Album of the Day - Blink 182- Enema of the State- (1999)

I Bet no one expected to see this one coming.  And in fact this one is a few years I'd ever cover short of the "25 year" criteria for Classic Rock.  But my children knew I would be "open minded" with their music to give an honest opinion of their merit.  Yeah, no doubt rock as form degraded in my opinion as a whole by 1999, but that didn't mean there weren't some few gems out there that were excellent.

One of those exceptions is who I felt was the best of those Alpha Numeric wave of punk bands that dominated the airwaves mostly between 1995-2005.  Blink 182 sure was one of those bands.  Of course punk never pretended to be high brow or  the highest level of musicianship.  Still, this band, and this particular album embodies the best elements of The Ramones......   Exploit the 3 chord, catchy tunes, and hilarity in their lyrics.  BUT...  there is one point, and I wouldn't call it a schtick, but this band has an insanely good drummer.  The guy's name is Travis Barker, and there is a bombastic level of energy not seen since Moon. The man is a living breathing 16th note measure filling percussive monster.  And there is a great deal of it that isn't filled with cymbal crashing.  Barker almost as if in a seldom the case, is the lead instrument for the band.  Seems the singing and guitars are the accompaniment,  in a manner not seen since Rush.  I better stop with comparisons to the Who and Rush, before I am carted off as crazy  :silly:  No these guys are not iconic British Invaders nor, Canadian Prog Masters.......   But they are really fun, and talented.  I can imagine with this band, a 90 minute set would be like running a marathon, with they energy they have to expound
 
In a crude way this is almost a concept album around the social and relationship angst and pressures of the teen years of a generation in the cusp of a new technological age.  Think about it, this is music about  the last generation of kids who in their teen years did not have their thumbs surgically attached to their phones.   I know many of you might turn this off just because of the era, and I don't blame you considering most else made during that time was shitty.  But if can go into this one with an open mind, you'll find you'll enjoy the heck out of it, and get some laughs too.   What also especially inpresses me with this CD (obviously never an LP) was the utter lack of filler.  Almost every tune is listenable.

And a warning, like a lot of music of this day, there's a lot of sexual content, language and adult themed lyrics. 

I'm also including a link to the lyrics so you can enjoy the hilarity while listening.

Tracks
----------

1- Dump Weed- Huge laughs right out of the gate, in this what the woke would now call a "sexist romp".   Bad Ass drumming (as there is in the next 11 songs). Even in 1999, can you imagine the response if you told the ladies.....  "I need a Girl that I can train"?  But if you saw some of these guys in their videos, they are a hoot, and might not the best guys to give you advice on "relationships". Can't complete this one's review without giving props to the innovative half beat off percussion. 2

2. Don't Leave Me.  More relationship advise from the boys. I about died laughing when I first heard this one.  The point where it is asked almost in 3rd party...   "One More Time with feeling" in the chorus?  5

3. Aliens Exist- Fantastic tune around UFO's and Aliens.  No doubt these guys were fans of Mulder and Scully in the day. Wonder what the 12 Majestic Lies were?  6

4. Going Away to College- Another romp of half beats and wonderful lyrics.  Except these are beautiful and from the heart.  Even almost 50 years ago, the phenomenon of leavng high school sweethearts after graduation remains a common theme among the ages  and socially difficult event.  It's not these guys are cerebral, but they do have a great finger on the pulse on the teenage psyche. 8

5. What's My Age-  The funniest cut of maybe the funniest rock albums I've heard, that focuses on the state of maturity of guys say 15-25.  Best punk/rockish jam of the entire album in last 30 seconds too.  Great tune, don't forget these are only 3 guys doing this. 3

6. Dysentary Gary- Maybe the weakest cut on the Album.  Anger on this one didn't age well. 12

7. Adam's Song-  KABOOM-  Whaaaaaaat?  Powerful and heartfelt song on teenage suicide?  This is written and sung with such conviction.   Song has a very very very sad and poignant feel and point to it.  As a parent, if this doesn't make you go out of your way to hug your teen aged kids, nothing will.  Incredibly powerful and cerebral on an emotional level.  A very strange and powerful contrast to the rest of the social commentary on Enema. 1

8. All the Small Things-  This was (is?) Blink's most recognizable number as a number, and considered the hit on the album.  And maybe the only song on the piece that has a "present day" hint in their day to day lives.  Kind of like a concept respite. Best hooks, to say for sure too.  Seems they needed a pop sound to augment the rest.  They infuse a little maybe sexual strangeness into it, but I'll leave that to your imaginaton. 4

9. The Party Song- Interesting perspective of a late '90's party.  Incredible syncopative meter in the song. Also funny as hell.  After hearing this song, I hadn't realized and watching my kid's school, is how aggressive girls of the time had become sexually. 9

10. Mutt- A lower tier cut, on an otherwise fantastic album. 11

11. Wendy Clear- A tick above the last one, but not the best.  nice bass line, and another tune that took a hiatus from the concept with a present day perspective from them.   Which was too bad since I had wished tgat they had stuck with the formula through out. 10

12. Anthem- Strong finish, with the band finishing with a generational spat ditty. Nicely musically crafted too, almost including some chordal fill. 7

Lyrics--------->  https://genius.com/albums/Blink-182/Enema-of-the-state


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zk8V10-0nN0
« Last Edit: January 22, 2023, 11:05:04 pm by catfish1957 »
I display the Confederate Battle Flag in honor of my great great great grandfathers who spilled blood at Wilson's Creek and Shiloh.  5 others served in the WBTS with honor too.

Offline sneakypete

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #793 on: January 22, 2023, 06:17:16 pm »
I started preparing these list in July 1973, then December 1973 and pretty much monthly afterwards for several years....

July 1973
================

1. Alice Cooper Band
2. Uriah Heep
 
 

 

@catfish1957

In MY alleged mind,Uriah Heep belongs at number two on anyone's list of great band,only surpassed by Pink Floyd,who belongs at the top of ANYONE's list.

I refer to PF as "Blues from the 25th Century".
Anyone who isn't paranoid in 2021 just isn't thinking clearly!

Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #794 on: January 24, 2023, 05:07:15 pm »
Classic Rock Album of the Day- The Who- Tommy (1969)

First a little back story of why this LP is so near and dear to my heart.  When I took College Sophomore English Literature, I had maybe the coolest College Professor ever.  He was citing existentialistic authors in the same vein as the Byrds, The Beatles, The Stones, and The Who.  One exercise in the class was an interpretive composition of The Eagles "The Last Resort" from Hotel California. You were allowed to hear the song twice in class, and then prepare your write up.  He also provided  an opportunity for those who choose to skip a book, to watch Tommy (The Movie) and provide the same.  I was never one to have patience to be a volumnous reader, so I jumped at the opportunity.

Needess to say, The Movie sucked, as big acts like Tina Turner and Elton John , who were great at their own genre did not realy give the service to  Townsend's work. OTOH, I did think Clapton being the cult priest was pretty amazing.   But from substance, at least the movie provided at least a glimpse at what and how Pete Townsend saw his work.  Tommy  was groundbreaking. It was the first true Rock Opera.

Most of the movie felt force fed.  I have always believed that Townsend never intended the Opera to be cramped into a 2 hour movie.  Additonally to being  forced feeling, it was made it feel too campy.  And even though Daltery had the aura to be the perfect "Tommy" in this movie, he sure wasn't any actor.  Still he deserves the props tat he sang the parts to perfection though.    But back to the review...... Tommy was a double album with 24 cuts.  I will discuss the numbers with substance, skipping those that were pretty much transitional pieces to the story.  The better part that  pretty much was the meat and bones that highlights Townsend's musical genius.

And as far as the topical value, Tommy pretty much was a piece about the dangers of false prophets, and almost a premonition of consequences of cults of personality versus merit.  There is also a lot of hidden intent around religion, and  if you have never listened, it may or may not be your cup of tea. As far as ranking, this is my second favorite Who LP just behind Who's Next.

Side 1-

Overture-  My favorite cut of the entire LP(s).  Yes, its an instrumental, but Townsend masterfully ties the hooks of much of the other parts of he opera into a fantastic piece of music.  Contrasting this with the best live version say, from Live from Leeds is amazing.  Augmenting the Piano, Hammond and the French Horn just gives the song a feel on a different level. 1

Amazing Journey-  Have never figured out how Townsend made the reverse flutist sound in the intro.  Damn innovative to say the least.  Love how the song starts so angelic and soft with powerful Daltery conviction, then cressendos in a classic Moon Drum bashing exercise.  Then reverses course on a dime. This one song maybe highlights Daltery's range the best of all.  4

Sparks- Another instrumental that really highlights the entire band's musical arsenal.  Entwistle's understated bass, which is pretty uncommon on Who tunes, works on so well. 10

Eyesight to the Blind- Almost included this in the transitional section, but included due to length.  Song mostly is relevant to the story, not as much ground breaking musically.  Nothing spectacular 15

Side 2-
-----------

Christmas/See Me Feel Me- Another Semi-Transitional Piece, Intro- Strange soundng somehwat simple, in a lot why you might see or hear in the Magic Bus Who era.  14

Cousin Kevin- Off Key ode to pedophiles, as it applies to the story.  I used to think it was just creepy until decades later Townsend was accused of having kiddy porn on his PC in the name of research.  Yeah, right.  This is now just disgusting, and he has to live with it.   And its not the only time the topic shows up in this opera/album.  18

Acid Queen- i prefer this version as far as story telling versus the much more energetic Tina Turner version. But its like reading a book.  Sometimes you don't want to hear the same story from different authors. 8

Underture-  Another instrumental, more dark and forboding.  Maybe the only time I head Moon use tymps in this level of volume. Still maybe the best Moon work on the album.  He certainly is the feature part in it.  11

Side 3-
------------

Do You Think It's Alright (Uncle Ernie) Another creepy piece around pedophillia.  Townsend could have easily left this shitty topic out of the story with no trouble.  But.......  17
 
Pinball Wizard-  Of course the most wide known and recognizable tune on the LP.  Great rocker, The strum/power chord blend is classic.   Elton John's version is very good too, but does have more of a pop tinge infused. Can't go wrong with either.  Daltery was definitely on top of his game too.   2

Go to the Mirror- Baba like chordal progresson works fantatiscally in this one of the best tunes on the LP.  Daltery show off the range again too.  This is one of about 6 tunes, on why if you are a Who fan, this one is essential to your collection. 4

Tommy Can You Hear Me-  Almost folk like little piece that phases beautiful harmonies.  No doubt these guys were not only talented, but had a very underated level of versatility. 13

Smash the Mirror- Turn the dial, and now a blusey direction-  Again versatility on parade. 12

Sensation- And now a pop tune.  I always found it interesting when Townsend tries to make himself sound like Daltery.   Works well though.  7

Side 4-
---------------

Sally Simpson- Very very strange addition, almost transitional, but senseless filler IMO.  I never understood why Townsend included this aspect in the story, except maybe to fuse the "groupie" moniker into the fray 16

I'm Free- Solid rocker that seems more stylisitically from Who's Next.  6

Welcome- Maybe the most operaic aspects of the work.  Daltery is a great singer, and it is amazing how he immerses obvious emotion into every almost "movement" of the song.  I always wondered how Tommy would have been if pete  had taken a purist approach to the concept. 9

Wer're Not Going to Take It-  Fabulous closing with another of The Who Classics.  Beautiful harmonic intertwine with strong musical play.
Second part of song focuses on enlightenment, which Daltery takes on with an Angelic approach.  And then the Clincher, some of the most powerful Who work yet.   Grand finale, for sure. Every band member shines.  3


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQ3Tul2F7vg
« Last Edit: January 24, 2023, 05:16:49 pm by catfish1957 »
I display the Confederate Battle Flag in honor of my great great great grandfathers who spilled blood at Wilson's Creek and Shiloh.  5 others served in the WBTS with honor too.

Offline Hoodat

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #795 on: January 25, 2023, 04:39:15 am »
We're Not Gonna Take It


If a political party does not have its foundation in the determination to advance a cause that is right and that is moral, then it is not a political party; it is merely a conspiracy to seize power.

-Dwight Eisenhower-

Offline dfwgator

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #796 on: January 25, 2023, 04:51:39 am »
If you are into Tarkus, you are truly a first rate ELP fan. 

 

Now, if "Love Beach" is your favorite ELP album, then seek help.

Offline dfwgator

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #797 on: January 25, 2023, 04:53:01 am »
I haven't played Tommy the studio version in a long time, because the live versions blow the studio versions away.

Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #798 on: January 25, 2023, 06:50:56 am »
Classic Rock Album of the Day- Black Oak Arkansas - Self Titled- (1971)

Way back in the day, we in middle America had late night radio station, that was called Beaker Street.  Beaker Street resided at KAAY in Little Rock, Arkansas, and from 11 pm- 2am played underground rock music that wasn't heard or available anywhere else on AM in the early to mid 1970's.  This station pre-dated the FM rock stations that we loved in late 1970's - 1990's.  Back in the day we were slaves to radio reception, and on really good days, we could get a clear signal of this mainstay of rock of the day.  In those early days, most of our AM were Country Stations or Easy Listening.  KAAY was our ticket into Rock that was unavailable elsewhere.  Back in those early 1970's where else could you here the latest from Bloodrock, Grand Funk, Uriah Heep, Alice Cooper, Black Sabbath and manu others. 

One band that got a lot of airplay from KAAY were the local boys from Black Oak.  Band was named after their small town in Arkansas.  Their 1st self titled LP, was very unique, took the dueling guitar bit to a good sound, infused country, blues, and enough eery strangeness to give this 1st one a mystique that sadly was never reproduced.  The band succumbed to the lifestyle, numerous lineup changeups, silly female backup singers, and magic and continuity was not there.

But the overall product is very crisp.  There is a lot more musicanship here than you would expect.  These aren't hacks with scrub boards and jew harps.  There is some really good dueling guitar jams.

Side 1-
----------

Uncle Lijah- Tune starts with a amost pre-historic Marshall Tucker sound, done very nicley.  Nice entertaining song about a song of old 105 year old Uncle Lijah.  Standard rocker, but right out of the gate you are blown away by Jim Dandy (Mangrum)'s signature growl that works to a "T".  I also love the religious and redemption motif, and that is a subject repeated on the LP. 5

Memories at the Window-  Boys strain on the ballad concept. The message is good, Swampy blusey, not bad, but not great. 7

The Hills of Arkansas- Country fare done very nicely.  Sounds like another one that easily could have been lifted by the Marshall Tucker Band.  Lot of soul put into this number, and you can tell these guys are really into their craft.  3

I Could Love You- Woooo....   Shaft like clicking riffs, with some pretty nice searing dual guitar work. Repetive line structure , but works nicey in a blusey manner. Fine song.....  Had forgot how good it was.  '70's Jamming for sure.  2

Side 2-
------------

Hot and Nasty-  Black Oak's first signature song.  The one that early got the air play.  Very interesting innovative vocal play that you can tell is a meme builder working on Mangrum's stage presence.  Though it has some pretty nice guitar interplay, 50 years later, it feels more like a novelty song. 6

Singng the Blues-  50 years ago, I screamed at the speakers at this country remake.  There was plenty of Buck Owens on the radio.  I didn't ask for this.  Now, I kind of view the band playing it as somewhat of a parody, with the nasally tone included.   They did song fine, but I don't think it was really homage, but just to show some possible flexibility in style.  Geez, who knows.  8

Lord Have Mercy on My Soul-  Band returns to the religion/redemption theme, in what may be one of the most eery songs of that era.  Song is narrated by a low speaking preacher, explaining his near death experience and being drawn both to the evil and good.  Background includes amost what would sound like the gnashing of teeth in hell.   After the speech, a rocking number ensues.  Fantastic bass line and some addtional interesting dualing guitar work in Southern Rock style. 1

When Electricity Came to Arkansas- Speaking of Scrub Boards-   :cool:  Percussion centerd and featured number that breaks out into a southern jam session, and finally goes balls to walls blusey-ville.  Man they sure sounded like they had a good time recording it. 4



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ps9sjgvLKI


« Last Edit: January 25, 2023, 06:53:50 am by catfish1957 »
I display the Confederate Battle Flag in honor of my great great great grandfathers who spilled blood at Wilson's Creek and Shiloh.  5 others served in the WBTS with honor too.

Offline catfish1957

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Re: Classic Rock Discussion thread, including Catfish's Top 20 Lists.
« Reply #799 on: January 25, 2023, 07:04:34 am »
Now, if "Love Beach" is your favorite ELP album, then seek help.

Yep, Keith punked us in this pathetic effort.  I still to this day, think it was a joke.  Even the album cover was beyond ridiculous.
They win the award for  what happens when you give the label the middle finger to meet a contractual obligation.

(Honorable mention: Boston- Don't Look Back)

I display the Confederate Battle Flag in honor of my great great great grandfathers who spilled blood at Wilson's Creek and Shiloh.  5 others served in the WBTS with honor too.