Author Topic: Some quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.  (Read 2515 times)

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Offline unite for individuality

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Some quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.
« on: January 14, 2023, 02:29:25 am »
In remembrance of Martin Luther King Day,
Here are some quotes from him.

Feel free to add more in the comments.



MLK - Everything Hitler did was legal




MLK - If you submit to fear of death, you're already dead




MLK - Violence solves no problems, it just creates new ones




MLK - Riots happen because grievances are not heard




This quote from John F. Kennedy seems to fit well here.

JFK - Those who make peaceful change impossible make violent change inevitable.


MLK - Punishment for doing right is small compared to damage to the soul by doing nothing




MLK - Lukewarm acceptance is worse than open opposition




MLK - To not object to evil is to cooperate with it




MLK - Only light can conquer darkness.  Only love can conquer hate.




And of course, there's the "I have a dream" speech.
It's well worth reading.
It's really just plain common sense.

Some black leaders in his day,
and many Democrats today,
strongly criticize Martin Luther King Jr.
for not being radical enough,
for not advocating violence.



   I have a dream

   August 28, 1963

Five score years ago, a great American,
in whose symbolic shadow we stand today,
signed the Emancipation Proclamation.
This momentous decree came as
a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves
who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice.
It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But 100 years later, the Negro still is not free.
One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by
the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination.
One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty
in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.
One hundred years later the Negro is still
languished in the corners of American society
and finds himself in exile in his own land.
And so we've come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.
In a sense we've come to our nation's capital to cash a check.

When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of
the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence,
they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir.
This note was a promise that all men — yes, Black men as well as white men —
would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note
insofar as her citizens of color are concerned.
Instead of honoring this sacred obligation,
America has given the Negro people a bad check,
a check which has come back marked insufficient funds.

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt.

We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds
in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation.
And so we've come to cash this check,
a check that will give us upon demand
the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

We have also come to his hallowed spot
to remind America of the fierce urgency of now.
This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off
or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism.

Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy.
Now is the time to rise from
the dark and desolate valley of segregation
to the sunlit path of racial justice.
Now is the time to lift our nation
from the quick sands of racial injustice
to the solid rock of brotherhood.
Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment.
This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent
will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality.
1963 is not an end, but a beginning.
Those who hope that the Negro
needed to blow off steam and will now be content
will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual.

There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America
until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights.
The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation
until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people
who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice.
In the process of gaining our rightful place,
we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds.
Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom
by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on
the high plane of dignity and discipline.
We must not allow our creative protest
to degenerate into physical violence.
Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of
meeting physical force with soul force.
The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community
must not lead us to a distrust of all white people,
for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today,
have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny.

And they have come to realize that
their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.
We cannot walk alone. And as we walk,
we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.
We cannot turn back.

There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights,
when will you be satisfied?
We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is
the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality.
We can never be satisfied as long as
our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel,
cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways
and the hotels of the cities.

We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro's basic mobility
is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one.
We can never be satisfied as long as our children are
stripped of their selfhood and robbed of their dignity
by signs stating: for whites only.

We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote
and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote.

No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until
justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you
have come here out of great trials and tribulations.
Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells.
Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom
left you battered by the storms of persecution
and staggered by the winds of police brutality.
You have been the veterans of creative suffering.
Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.
Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama,
go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana,
go back to the slums and ghettos of our Northern cities,
knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

So even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow,
I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.
I have a dream that one day this nation
will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed:
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia,
the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners
will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi,
a state sweltering with the heat of injustice,
sweltering with the heat of oppression
will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children
will one day live in a nation where
they will not be judged by the color of their skin
but by the content of their character.
I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day down in Alabama with its vicious racists,
with its governor having his lips dripping with
the words of interposition and nullification,
one day right down in Alabama
little Black boys and Black girls will be able to join hands with
little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.
I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted,
every hill and mountain shall be made low,
the rough places will be made plain,
and the crooked places will be made straight,
and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed,
and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith that I go back to the South with.
With this faith, we will be able to
hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope.
With this faith we will be able to
transform the jangling discords of our nation
into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood.
With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together,
to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together,
knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God's children
will be able to sing with new meaning:
My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing.
Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrims' pride,
from every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.
And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.
Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.
Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.
Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado.
Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California.
But not only that, let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.
Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.
Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.
From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, and when we allow freedom ring,
when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet,
from every state and every city,
we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children,
Black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics,
will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:
Free at last. Free at last. Thank God almighty, we are free at last.

If all mankind minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion,
mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.
   -- John Stuart Mill

Here are the 10 RINOs who voted to impeach Trump on Jan. 13, 2021 - NEVER forget!
WY  Liz Cheney      SC 7  Tom Rice             WA 4  Dan Newhouse    IL 16  Adam Kinzinger    OH 16  Anthony Gonzalez
MI 6  Fred Upton    WA 3  Jaime Herrera Beutler    MI 3  Peter Meijer       NY 24  John Katko       CA 21  David Valadao

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Re: Some quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2023, 02:34:43 am »
All i know about MLK is if I need gas and there is an exit off of the interstate for MLK Blvd... I keep on driving.
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Re: Some quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2023, 02:38:44 am »
"It's good for your soul."

King, as a fellow pastor raped a woman in front of him at the Willard Hotel in Baltimore, MD, to the woman being assaulted.

Also:

"Get your damned ass down here because I have a beautiful white broad here." (the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas in April 1964)

"International Association for Advancement of P***y Eaters."

https://www.businessinsider.com/fbi-tapes-allege-mlk-watched-rape-2019-5
« Last Edit: January 14, 2023, 02:41:21 am by jmyrlefuller »
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Offline unite for individuality

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Re: Some quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2023, 09:27:06 pm »
"It's good for your soul."
King, as a fellow pastor raped a woman in front of him
at the Willard Hotel in Baltimore, MD, to the woman being assaulted.

Also:

"Get your damned ass down here because I have a beautiful white broad here."
(the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas in April 1964)

"International Association for Advancement of P***y Eaters."

https://www.businessinsider.com/fbi-tapes-allege-mlk-watched-rape-2019-5


Considering the recent revelations about the FBI's involvement in
big tech lying about COVID, election theft, and other topics,
it makes me suspect that the FBI might have been lying about MLK, too.

I cannot say definitely whether or not MLK actually did
any of those things of which the FBI accused him.

We CAN say definitely that MLK actually DID make
all the public statements that are quoted in the original post.

If MLK actually was as badly flawed as the FBI claims he was,
his messages still speak for themselves.

Read his words, and judge for yourself whether or not his messages are valid.

If all mankind minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion,
mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.
   -- John Stuart Mill

Here are the 10 RINOs who voted to impeach Trump on Jan. 13, 2021 - NEVER forget!
WY  Liz Cheney      SC 7  Tom Rice             WA 4  Dan Newhouse    IL 16  Adam Kinzinger    OH 16  Anthony Gonzalez
MI 6  Fred Upton    WA 3  Jaime Herrera Beutler    MI 3  Peter Meijer       NY 24  John Katko       CA 21  David Valadao

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Re: Some quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2023, 03:41:00 am »

Considering the recent revelations about the FBI's involvement in
big tech lying about COVID, election theft, and other topics,
it makes me suspect that the FBI might have been lying about MLK, too.

I cannot say definitely whether or not MLK actually did
any of those things of which the FBI accused him.

We CAN say definitely that MLK actually DID make
all the public statements that are quoted in the original post.

If MLK actually was as badly flawed as the FBI claims he was,
his messages still speak for themselves.

Read his words, and judge for yourself whether or not his messages are valid.

I did. Read what he started talking about after the March on Washington and the "I Have a Dream" pablum.

As soon as LBJ gave that man the Civil Rights Act, giving the U.S. government unprecedented micromanagement over private businesses' affairs, and the Warren Court stripped away pretty much every individual right in this country for the sake of "anti-racism," King started demanding universal basic income. He started leading "Poor People's Campaigns" that were supposed to unite the races, but all the pictures pretty much showed all his followers were black.

The FBI threatened to expose his sexual deviancy and told him to either commit suicide or be revealed. So King orchestrated his own assassination, including picking his own funeral song.

It is ironic that a man who publicly spoke of being judged on the content of his character but not the color of his skin, now has a federal holiday—an honor only two other people, George Washington and Jesus, have— because of the color of his skin and completely ignoring the content of his character.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2023, 03:42:33 am by jmyrlefuller »
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Offline unite for individuality

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Re: Some quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2023, 06:12:28 am »
This is actually a good discussion we're having here.
History is rarely as simple and straightforward as it is presented in schools.
There are usually multiple sources with varying points of view.

I did (read MLK's words). Read what he started talking about after the March on Washington and the "I Have a Dream" pablum.

As soon as LBJ gave that man the Civil Rights Act, giving the U.S. government unprecedented micromanagement over private businesses' affairs, and the Warren Court stripped away pretty much every individual right in this country for the sake of "anti-racism," King started demanding universal basic income. He started leading "Poor People's Campaigns" that were supposed to unite the races, but all the pictures pretty much showed all his followers were black.

The FBI threatened to expose his sexual deviancy and told him to either commit suicide or be revealed. So King orchestrated his own assassination, including picking his own funeral song.

It is ironic that a man who publicly spoke of being judged on the content of his character but not the color of his skin, now has a federal holiday—an honor only two other people, George Washington and Jesus, have— because of the color of his skin and completely ignoring the content of his character.


That actually is a valid concern about the Civil Rights Act.
A privately owned entity SHOULD have the right
to grant or deny access to whomever they choose.
The widespread discrimination that was practiced back then
could be considered an abuse of that right,
and the reason why the government stopped protecting that right.

The idea of someone arranging their own assassination
is hard to believe, but not impossible.
Another theory that's floated around since then is that
other leaders, like Jesse Jackson, may have arranged the assassination,
so that THEY could become the pre-eminent leaders of the movement.

If all mankind minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion,
mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.
   -- John Stuart Mill

Here are the 10 RINOs who voted to impeach Trump on Jan. 13, 2021 - NEVER forget!
WY  Liz Cheney      SC 7  Tom Rice             WA 4  Dan Newhouse    IL 16  Adam Kinzinger    OH 16  Anthony Gonzalez
MI 6  Fred Upton    WA 3  Jaime Herrera Beutler    MI 3  Peter Meijer       NY 24  John Katko       CA 21  David Valadao

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Re: Some quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2023, 12:31:01 pm »
No matter how inspiring his words, it's hard not to wonder whether they were plagiarized.
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Re: Some quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2023, 03:01:18 pm »
Quote
I have a dream that my four little children
will one day live in a nation where
they will not be judged by the color of their skin
but by the content of their character.

Democrats opposed those words in 1963.  And Democrats continue to oppose them today.
If a political party does not have its foundation in the determination to advance a cause that is right and that is moral, then it is not a political party; it is merely a conspiracy to seize power.     -Dwight Eisenhower-

"The [U.S.] Constitution is a limitation on the government, not on private individuals ... it does not prescribe the conduct of private individuals, only the conduct of the government ... it is not a charter for government power, but a charter of the citizen's protection against the government."     -Ayn Rand-

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Re: Some quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2023, 03:05:34 pm »
"Rarely do we find men who willingly engage in hard, solid thinking. There is an almost universal quest for easy answers and half-baked solutions. Nothing pains some people more than having to think."
If a political party does not have its foundation in the determination to advance a cause that is right and that is moral, then it is not a political party; it is merely a conspiracy to seize power.     -Dwight Eisenhower-

"The [U.S.] Constitution is a limitation on the government, not on private individuals ... it does not prescribe the conduct of private individuals, only the conduct of the government ... it is not a charter for government power, but a charter of the citizen's protection against the government."     -Ayn Rand-