Author Topic: Cats among mammals that can emit fluoresce, new study finds  (Read 664 times)

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Offline Gefn

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Cats among mammals that can emit fluoresce, new study finds
« on: October 04, 2023, 07:14:21 pm »
LONDON -- Over the last few years, fluorescence under ultraviolet light has been reported among many animals, including birds, reptiles, insects and fish. However, not much has been known about the frequency of fluorescence among mammals. Until now.

In a new study published today by researchers from the Western Australian Museum and Curtin University, fluorescence among mammals was found to be "extremely common."

Researchers studied 125 mammal species -- both preserved and frozen -- held in museum collections for the presence of "apparent fluorescence" under UV light, finding "apparent fluorescence" in all mammal specimens investigated to varying degrees.

These include domestic cats, or Felis catus, along with polar bears, bats, mountain zebra, wombats, dwarf spinner dolphins, leopards and Tasmanian devils.


https://abcnews.go.com/International/story?id=103713730
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Offline Gefn

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Re: Cats among mammals that can emit fluoresce, new study finds
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2023, 07:15:47 pm »
LONDON -- Over the last few years, fluorescence under ultraviolet light has been reported among many animals, including birds, reptiles, insects and fish. However, not much has been known about the frequency of fluorescence among mammals. Until now.

In a new study published today by researchers from the Western Australian Museum and Curtin University, fluorescence among mammals was found to be "extremely common."

Researchers studied 125 mammal species -- both preserved and frozen -- held in museum collections for the presence of "apparent fluorescence" under UV light, finding "apparent fluorescence" in all mammal specimens investigated to varying degrees.

These include domestic cats, or Felis catus, along with polar bears, bats, mountain zebra, wombats, dwarf spinner dolphins, leopards and Tasmanian devils.


https://abcnews.go.com/International/story?id=103713730

Title is misleading but it's still a cool article.
G-d bless America. G-d bless us all                                 

Adopt a puppy or kitty from your local shelter
Or an older dog or cat. They're true love❤️