General Category > Science, Technology and Knowledge

How Much Driving Range Does an EV Lose in the Cold and During Winter?

(1/1)

rangerrebew:
How Much Driving Range Does an EV Lose in the Cold and During Winter?
Produced by Digital Editors - Yesterday 3:16 PM
 
At this point, most EV drivers know that cold weather can negatively impact the range of their vehicles. It also causes your EV to have longer charging times. That’s because the chemical reactions that allow the battery to run are slowed down whenever there’s an extreme temperature drop.

Exactly how much range can you expect to lose during the winter months? Let’s go over when range loss happens and how you can avoid it.

What’s the optimal battery temperature for EVs?
 
The best EV battery temperature varies depending on the make and model of your vehicle. However, a temperature between 50° to 90° Fahrenheit is considered average. According to Geotab, most EVs can achieve peak performance when the battery is 70°F.

What cold temperatures affect EV range?

Your EV’s range will generally start to depreciate once exterior temperatures have dipped below 40°F. According to Axios, some vehicles maintain most of their estimated range despite drastic temperature drops. For example, the Hyundai Kona EV and Audi e-tron operate at 93% efficiency in temperatures between 20-30°F.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/ownership/how-much-driving-range-does-an-ev-lose-in-the-cold-and-during-winter/ar-AA12tYaW?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=45359c226761491dbcbc6d927aa03579

Smokin Joe:
Wait right there. Twenty to thirty ABOVE ZERO may be considered a "drastic" temperature drop in the places that want to mandate these things, but they are at least 60 degrees of the mark. A drastic temperature drop in these parts will take you down to -40 or more.


So, let's play maths...keeping in mind that you will only be able to charge to 96% (the guy in the video got to 100% at 10 degrees above (F), still 40-50 degrees above the depths of winter here)

--- Quote ---If your EV’s heater is on full blast, you could lose 41% of your estimated driving range. According to SolarReviews, you should also be mindful of the last 20% of your EV’s battery. Without that power, your EV might have difficulty charging itself at all if the battery is already too cold.
--- End quote ---


Okay, 41% lost to the heater, 20% reserve, 5% not charged, leaves 35%  capacity for actually going down the road.

The guy in the video almost did not have enough to get where he wanted to go. (What they did not tell you is that this guy was going down hill all the way, Oslo is near sea level) I doubt he was bucking a 35-40 MPH head wind, either...

In that car, one hundred percent charge was good for ~170 kilometers--again, downhill  (about a 100 miles), so it would take at least one charging stop to get to the next major town here in ND 120-130 miles away.

He ran his down to 3 percent charge, something no gasoline fueled vehicle driver would do in these parts, no matter what time of year--at least not intentionally, but never in winter unless they were using that last bit to try to keep from freezing to death and praying for rescue.

At issue, above all, is the definition of "cold" weather.

What is normal in winter for those of us above the 48th parallel in the mid continent is inconceivably cold for other parts of the country, who think the thirties (above zero, Fahrenheit) are "cold", and below freezing is 'extreme".
I have winter gear I don't even break out at those temps (too warm).
If you can spit and it doesn't hit the ground frozen, folks, you aren't there, and that EV won't get you far in that.

roamer_1:

--- Quote from: Smokin Joe on October 03, 2022, 12:14:23 am ---Wait right there. Twenty to thirty ABOVE ZERO may be considered a "drastic" temperature drop in the places that want to mandate these things, but they are at least 60 degrees of the mark. A drastic temperature drop in these parts will take you down to -40 or more.


--- End quote ---

WHOLE POST is right!
Preach it!  :beer:

Navigation

[0] Message Index

Go to full version