Author Topic: 80% of new IRS revenue will come from small businesses earning under $200K: tax experts  (Read 804 times)

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Online Hoodat

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That's now my point of contention; if Republicans aren't going to fight for conservatism and for their constituents, why vote for them?

As has been stated many times in this forum, failed leadership (McConnell, Ryan, Bohner) has played a significant role in the demise of the Republican party and conservatism and they too frequently make back room deals and reach across the aisle.

Exactly.  Reconciliation is the simplest process to thwart.  The Republicans have the ability to block it, just as they had the ability to block Obamacare.  With reconciliation, no amendment can be refused a vote provided that the one submitting the amendment read it in full before the Senate.  Yet McConnell has probably already signed off on an agreement with the Dems to limit the number of amendments.  Also, reconciliation cannot be used to pass a tax increase.  It is a violation of the rules.  Which is why back in 2010 the Dems insisted that Obamacare was not a tax bill.

Of course once the Supreme Court ruled that it was indeed a tax bill, the Republicans could have gotten it annulled.  But they wanted Obamacare just as much as the Democrats did.
If a political party does not have its foundation in the determination to advance a cause that is right and that is moral, then it is not a political party; it is merely a conspiracy to seize power.

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Offline andy58-in-nh

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One of the few mistakes our Founders made was to establish a concentrated locus of Federal power in one geographical location - Washington, DC.

I suppose they could not foresee how, over time, power and authority would dramatically accumulate as Federal government institutions chose to willfully ignore constitutional limits, in favor of establishing permanent sinecures purchased with promises and favors voluntarily paid for by citizens in diverse and relatively powerless localities.
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New York State Rifle and Pistol Association v. Bruen

Online roamer_1

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One of the few mistakes our Founders made was to establish a concentrated locus of Federal power in one geographical location - Washington, DC.

I suppose they could not foresee how, over time, power and authority would dramatically accumulate as Federal government institutions chose to willfully ignore constitutional limits, in favor of establishing permanent sinecures purchased with promises and favors voluntarily paid for by citizens in diverse and relatively powerless localities.

technically, they did not. They envisioned what would be today a fifty-one point distribution... With one point being the federal government.

Imagine a lobby that had to service all fifty states instead of just the fed.
The problem is that we have allowed big government at the federal level - exactly what they were afraid of and warned against.

Offline andy58-in-nh

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technically, they did not. They envisioned what would be today a fifty-one point distribution... With one point being the federal government.

Imagine a lobby that had to service all fifty states instead of just the fed.
The problem is that we have allowed big government at the federal level - exactly what they were afraid of and warned against.

The Federalists (including Alexander Hamilton and John Jay) did not envision it that way. They were fully committed to the superiority of the Federal government, but as checked by state power exercised in state legislatures and dutifully respected by Congress. What they did not see was how over the course of time, Congress would willfully cede its law-making authority to the Executive Branch. This process was exacerbated  by the direct election of senators to represent not states as a whole (elected by state legislatures) to direct election by popular democratic vote. In the late 19th century and early 20th, the rise of Progressive ideology led to the promotion of an ever more powerful Federal government, abetted ultimately by the third branch of government, the judiciary, most directly when the Supreme Court under FDR began to reinterpret the Constitution so as to allow complete Federal control over interstate commerce, and to practically ignore the 10th Amendment's boundaries in respect of enumerated Federal powers.         
"The constitutional right to bear arms in public for self-defense is not ‘a second-class right, subject to an entirely different body of rules than the other Bill of Rights guarantees."
- U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas
New York State Rifle and Pistol Association v. Bruen

Online roamer_1

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The Federalists (including Alexander Hamilton and John Jay) did not envision it that way. They were fully committed to the superiority of the Federal government, but as checked by state power exercised in state legislatures and dutifully respected by Congress. What they did not see was how over the course of time, Congress would willfully cede its law-making authority to the Executive Branch. This process was exacerbated  by the direct election of senators to represent not states as a whole (elected by state legislatures) to direct election by popular democratic vote. In the late 19th century and early 20th, the rise of Progressive ideology led to the promotion of an ever more powerful Federal government, abetted ultimately by the third branch of government, the judiciary, most directly when the Supreme Court under FDR began to reinterpret the Constitution so as to allow complete Federal control over interstate commerce, and to practically ignore the 10th Amendment's boundaries in respect of enumerated Federal powers.       

I can live with that - The point being the very same... Big.gov was not envisioned. And we are responsible for it. We let it happen. Progressivism or not.

Offline bilo

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The biggest problem small business owners typically have is that they don't have the documents to substantiate deductions they claimed, or they took an extremely aggressive position on an item and claimed it was deductible when, in point of fact, there were really good arguments that it wasn't.

That being said, it can be expensive to try and put together the necessary documentation after the fact, and sometimes it ends up being less expensive to accept disallowance of a deduction than to try to get all of the substantiation put together, particularly if it involved payments made to third persons that were made several years before.

Even if they have all the paperwork, which can get to be pretty tough, they still have to go in and prove it to the satisfaction of the agent. A small business owner doesn't have the time or money to deal with this garbage.

I can give you a real life example. I started a business in the 1980's and had apprx. 10 employees. After a couple years in business I started getting letters from the IRS that my payroll withholding payments were incorrect and I needed to pay an additional amount plus interest. It was not a huge sum. It was in the hundreds of dollars amount. I contacted my accountant and she assured me that the payments I made were correct, but if I wanted to fight it the cost would be greater than the payment. I paid and after a couple more notifications from the IRS terminated my former employees and rehired them as contractors. After this experience in every business venture I've pursued I've gone out of my way to have as few employees as possible. It's just not worth the hassle.
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