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Investment Tips Thread

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catfish1957:
First the disclaimers....   This thread is intended for recreation, and any advise, tips, or information provided to the reader is with the understanding that investing in general invokes risk.  Anything you see here may cause you to lose value in your investment. 

Secondly, please understand that you really need to do your research before pulling the trigger.  A knowledgeable investor always outperforms

Thirdly, please make sure that with the inherent nature that investing of any manner consitutes a gamble, that you do not risk money that you can't afford to lose......

catfish1957:
Figure, I'll start the proceedings with a general analysis .....


Not knowing everyone's  exact situation, I really don't like to give specifics on investment choices. I haven't batted 1.000 in these 40 years, and would hate for someone to lose money on what i may think is a good play. What may be a good choice for a 64 year old retiree may not be the same for someone else.

In any casem here is some general advise that has served me well through the years and during '87, '00, '08, and now.......

1. Priority 1 should be eliminating or reducing debt. I view debt payments by default as negative income.

2. Competitively bid all aspects of your expenses. Get the utmost value down to the penny for everything you buy, or services you secure. Over years and years, you would be surprised how much this adds to your net worth balance sheet.

3. Keep your investment portfolio that is intended toward goals... i.e retirement as an example, in strong conservative investments. When you have those bases covered, then you can look at speculative plays.

4. I invested zero in the dot coms in the '90's. My father gave me the best advise of all in that era.. "Why would you ever invest in anything that by default does not  make money?"   To me that rule still applies today.

5. I have found that the simple rule of putting 100 minus your age in equities has worked pretty well for me. Maybe not for everyone, but........

6. Research and "like". When investing, I tend to get into stocks which I think have good products and services  that I like. Before getting in I research it to death too. A Low P/E is often a good indicator. Furthermore, is there a long term demand for that product or service?

7. The best time often to invest is when everyone is rushing out the door. That is the toughest part, but finding a price bottom is golden toward finding long term returns.

8. Monitor investments and net worth monthly. Research, evaluate, and adjust as needed.

9. Don't fall in love with a stock/fund/etc. so much that you resist selling when the fruit is ripe. Don't forget that your favorite stock is not a family member.

10. Never forget that a SHTF scenario is always a possibility. Remote, but still there. Have a base amount of investments that will address. Metals, Land, etc.

11. Formulate and adhere to three different budget scenarios... (1) Regular (2) Austerity (3) Emergency.

Just my philosphy, what sez other Briefers..

EdinVA:
I stayed away from gold/silver.  If we really do have a SHTF situation, people want food and shelter not gold.  It just seems to me that a few acres of land with some sort of shelter and equipment to work it would be better with maybe a stash of some trade goods.

just my 2 cents..

catfish1957:

--- Quote from: EdinVA on December 06, 2021, 09:19:20 pm ---I stayed away from gold/silver.  If we really do have a SHTF situation, people want food and shelter not gold.  It just seems to me that a few acres of land with some sort of shelter and equipment to work it would be better with maybe a stash of some trade goods.

just my 2 cents..

--- End quote ---

Good points.

I figure my 3 farms parcels and 3 homes with acreage will cover that angle.  Wife is a master gardener, and has vegetable seeds enough to last 10 years for a 1000 square foot garden.   Still, Gold and Silver might be the $100's and $1's of a dystopian economy. Plus it will be the capital base of wealth to rebuild.   

Main residence has a potable water well, so I will have drinking water  as tender too.   I highly recommend if possible, everybody getting a well/ generator if it is allowed in your location.  Finally, I have held on to an old Nissan Titan that is flex fuel, and can fully operate on pure ethanol.  Many  have asked why I have held on to it....  I think you can see why.

libertybele:

--- Quote from: catfish1957 on December 06, 2021, 05:05:31 pm ---Figure, I'll start the proceedings with a general analysis .....


Not knowing everyone's  exact situation, I really don't like to give specifics on investment choices. I haven't batted 1.000 in these 40 years, and would hate for someone to lose money on what i may think is a good play. What may be a good choice for a 64 year old retiree may not be the same for someone else.

In any casem here is some general advise that has served me well through the years and during '87, '00, '08, and now.......

1. Priority 1 should be eliminating or reducing debt. I view debt payments by default as negative income.

2. Competitively bid all aspects of your expenses. Get the utmost value down to the penny for everything you buy, or services you secure. Over years and years, you would be surprised how much this adds to your net worth balance sheet.

3. Keep your investment portfolio that is intended toward goals... i.e retirement as an example, in strong conservative investments. When you have those bases covered, then you can look at speculative plays.

4. I invested zero in the dot coms in the '90's. My father gave me the best advise of all in that era.. "Why would you ever invest in anything that by default does not  make money?"   To me that rules still applies today.

5. I have found that the simple rule of putting 100 minus your age in equities has worked pretty well for me. Maybe not for everyone, but........

6. Research and "like". When investing, I tend to get into stocks which I think have good products that I like. Before getting in I research it to death too. A Low P/E is often a good indicator. Furthermore, is there a long term demand for the product?

7. The best time often to invest is when everyone is rushing out the door. The is the toughest part, but finding a price bottom, is golden toward finding long term return.

8. Monitor investments and net worth monthly. Research, evaluate, and adjust as needed.

9. Don't fall in love with a stock/fund/etc. so much that you resist selling when the fruit is ripe. Don't forget that your favorite stock is not a family member.

10. Never forget that a SHTF scenario is always a possibility. Remote, but still there. Have a base amount of investments that will address. Metals, Land, etc.

11. Formulate and adhere to three different budget scenarios... (1) Regular (2) Austerity (3) Emergency.

Just my philosphy, what sez other Briefers..

--- End quote ---

Definitely being as debt free as possible is important. Even at that Glenn Beck has advocated that they way things are being run today and the way that the gov't is heading us, no one will own anything -- basically the gov't and the elitist will own everything.

I believe it is crucial that you have a paper trail to prove ownership of your land, house, stocks, etc., -- something other than an on-line copy of your deed and an on-line statement of your account(s).  It's going to be too easy for everything to *poof* just disappear.

Gold and silver I believe are still going to be valuable. (I know of someone who survived the Vietnam war buy giving a small chunk of his gold chain here and there and it saved his life). 

We do not have our own well, but we do have a canal outback that we can draw water from (provided that they don't drain it) and use distillation to make it drinkable.



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