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We've Been Telling the Alamo Story Wrong for Nearly 200 Years. Now It's Time to Correct the Record

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corbe:
We've Been Telling the Alamo Story Wrong for Nearly 200 Years. Now It's Time to Correct the Record

BY BRYAN BURROUGH AND JASON STANFORD JUNE 9, 2021 5:43 PM EDT

Imagine if the U.S. were to open interior Alaska for colonization and, for whatever reason, thousands of Canadian settlers poured in, establishing their own towns, hockey rinks and Tim Hortons stores. When the U.S. insists they follow American laws and pay American taxes, they refuse. When the government tries to collect taxes, they shoot and kill American soldiers. When law enforcement goes after the killers, the colonists, backed by Canadian financing and mercenaries, take up arms in open revolt.

As an American, how would you feel? Now you can imagine how Mexican President Jose Lopez de Santa Anna would have felt in 1835, because that’s pretty much the story of the revolution that paved the way for Texas to become its own nation and then an American state.

If that’s not the version of history you’re familiar with, you’re not alone. The version most Americans know, the “Heroic Anglo Narrative” that has held sway for nearly 200 years, holds that American colonists revolted against Mexico because they were “oppressed” and fought for their “freedom,” a narrative that has been soundly rebutted by 30-plus years of academic scholarship. But the many myths surrounding Texas’ birth, especially those cloaking the fabled 1836 siege at the Alamo mission in San Antonio, remain cherished in the state. Even as the nation is undergoing a sweeping reassessment of its racial history, and despite decades of academic research that casts the Texas Revolt and the Alamo’s siege in a new light, little of this has permeated the conversation in Texas.

<..snip..>

https://time.com/6072141/alamo-history-myths/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

corbe:
   Time and Time again, they get History WRONG!





Counting Crows - Time And Time Again


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Mxo-FJ8W0Y

GrouchoTex:
I read the article a few days ago.
Most people know some of the things that they said we get wrong, like Davy Crockett dying after the battle.
He was executed.

The fact that many Tejanos — Texas Latinos— allied with the Americans, and fought and died alongside them at the Alamo, has generally been lost to popular history.

Not true, most people I know understand this.

They left this out:
After Santa Anna was elected, Santa Anna transformed himself into a centralist dictator, ultimately replacing the 1824 Mexican constitution with a new document, the Seven Laws (1836), that formally put power in the hands of the landed aristocracy (with property qualifications established for holding office and voting) and reconstituted the Mexican states as military districts.

skeeter:
I'm all for telling history the way it is - how about a chapter on Santa Ana taking over a democratic government and breaking all of the promises of a US-style Constitution made to those immigrant Texians the Mexican Government solicited in order to tame a wilderness it could not control or make productive itself.

After that we can add the story of siege at Goliad, General Fannin and his entire command of 425+ souls executed by Santa Ana after surrendering to our grade school history books.

Journalists these days are so friggen ignorant.

GrouchoTex:

--- Quote from: skeeter on June 17, 2021, 03:19:28 PM ---I'm all for telling history the way it is - how about a chapter on Santa Ana taking over a democratic government and breaking all of the promises of a US-style Constitution made to those immigrant Texians the Mexican Government solicited in order to tame a wilderness it could not control or make productive itself.

After that we can add the story of siege at Goliad, General Fanning and his entire command of 425+ souls executed by Santa Ana after surrendering to our grade school history books.

--- End quote ---

True, they couldn't get enough people from Mexico to immigrate to Texas in the numbers they wanted, so they asked Americans to.

Also, Fannin and his men were executed on Palm Sunday.

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