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George Washington anticipating 2021 in 1796

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rangerrebew:
I thought it may be time to go back to George Washington to get some thoughts which we should never have forgotten.  I enclose 2 paragraphs from his "Farewell Address' which I will assure you no leftist or politicians in general would wants you to read.  Had this country followed his advice and warnings, we would not be looking down the barrels of a Chinese double shotgun.  I will highlight a few things and leave to rest for the reader.  I encourage you to read the whole address which can readily be found on line.
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It is important, likewise, that the habits of thinking in a free country should inspire caution in those entrusted with its administration, to confine themselves within their respective constitutional spheres, avoiding in the exercise of the powers of one department to encroach upon another. The spirit of encroachment tends to consolidate the powers of all the departments in one, and thus to create, whatever the form of government, a real despotism. A just estimate of that love of power, and proneness to abuse it, which predominates in the human heart, is sufficient to satisfy us of the truth of this position. The necessity of reciprocal checks in the exercise of political power, by dividing and distributing it into different depositaries, and constituting each the guardian of the public weal against invasions by the others, has been evinced by experiments ancient and modern; some of them in our country and under our own eyes. To preserve them must be as necessary as to institute them. If, in the opinion of the people, the distribution or modification of the constitutional powers be in any particular wrong, let it be corrected by an amendment in the way which the Constitution designates. But let there be no change by usurpation; for though this, in one instance, may be the instrument of good, it is the customary weapon by which free governments are destroyed. The precedent must always greatly overbalance in permanent evil any partial or transient benefit, which the use can at any time yield.

Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice ? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.

jafo2010:
Washington sounds like a windbag.  Two long paragraphs that could have been expressed in two sentences.

Texas Yellow Rose:

--- Quote from: jafo2010 on February 08, 2021, 01:02:45 AM ---Washington sounds like a windbag.  Two long paragraphs that could have been expressed in two sentences.

--- End quote ---

I don't think so!

DefiantMassRINO:
They don't call it the Age of Reason for nothing.

unite for individuality:

--- Quote from: jafo2010 on February 08, 2021, 01:02:45 AM ---Washington sounds like a windbag.  Two long paragraphs that could have been expressed in two sentences.

--- End quote ---

That elegant style of writing was very common in Washington's day.
Almost everything written by America's founders reads that way.
People used to be much more patient.
People today have been conditioned by TV ads, etc.
to expect all messaging to be fast, simple, and easy,
often at the expense of being accurate.

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