Author Topic: The One-Year Pantry, Layer by Layer  (Read 723 times)

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Offline DCPatriot

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The One-Year Pantry, Layer by Layer
« on: March 13, 2013, 08:56:26 PM »
The One-Year Pantry, Layer by Layer

When planning for emergencies, layering is an ever-constant theme. I often emphasize when one begins to prepare that you start simply by preparing for small-scale emergencies, and then slowly begin adding onto those existing preps to create a longer term preparedness supply. These emergency layers help you create a reliable foundation, and the same layering approach can be used when creating a food storage pantry.

There are some emergency food considerations to keep in mind:

    The amount of people in the household.
    Have a good amount of food varieties to reduce food fatigue.
    The serving size of the food.
    Vitamin content in the food.
    The expiration date or “best if used by” labels on the food.
    Special health conditions for family members.

Additionally, these essential food pantry rules can come in handy when you decide on which food to purchase.
Your Food Storage Layers

Layer 1 (0- 72-hours) – In the onset of an emergency and the days following a disaster, the first food to go should be from the refrigerator. Keep in mind that refrigerated food will stay cold for four to six hours, assuming the door is left closed as much as possible. In a fully stocked freezer, foods remain safely frozen for approximately two days if the door stays closed. You want to use up your perishable foods first and then begin preparing your foods that are frozen. Plan meals to meet a 1500-2000 calorie diet that are high in nutrients. Once the perishable food has been consumed, it’s time to move onto your secondary layer of your emergency preps. A word of advice – have an ample supply of water on hand!

Layer 2 (4-30 days) - These emergency foods should consist of “just add water” meals or meals that do not require substantial amounts of water, fuel or preparation time. Having some canned, pre-packaged dinners, or  meals that are “ready to eat” during emergency scenarios will help you begin acclimating yourself to cooking in a

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« Last Edit: March 13, 2013, 08:57:03 PM by DCPatriot »
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