Author Topic: Morphogenetic Fields, Telepathy and Science Set Free. [Murmuration birds/fishes]  (Read 2390 times)

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Offline DCPatriot

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"It aint what you don't know that kills you.  It's what you know that aint so!" ...Theodore Sturgeon

"Journalism is about covering the news.  With a pillow.  Until it stops moving."    - Iowahawk

Offline DCPatriot

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<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XH-groCeKbE" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XH-groCeKbE</a>



Starlings on Otmoor......


at 4:00.....a big WOW! 
« Last Edit: January 31, 2013, 05:00:07 PM by DCPatriot »
"It aint what you don't know that kills you.  It's what you know that aint so!" ...Theodore Sturgeon

"Journalism is about covering the news.  With a pillow.  Until it stops moving."    - Iowahawk

famousdayandyear

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Starlings on Otmoor

Hypnotic, amazing sight!

Offline DCPatriot

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Wonder how many birds fall to the ground with broken wings....from 'collisions'.

Does it provide a chance to cull the flock with 'survival of the fittest' maneuvers?

The reason...the narrator says earlier that when they eventually roost, the strongest males get the highest branches and the 'women' are shoved out to the edge of tiny branches.   

......as it should be!   {{{ducks}}}  LOL
« Last Edit: January 31, 2013, 05:27:46 PM by DCPatriot »
"It aint what you don't know that kills you.  It's what you know that aint so!" ...Theodore Sturgeon

"Journalism is about covering the news.  With a pillow.  Until it stops moving."    - Iowahawk

famousdayandyear

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Wonder how many birds fall to the ground with broken wings....from 'collisions'.

Does it provide a chance to cull the flock with 'survival of the fittest' maneuvers?

The reason...the narrator says earlier that when they eventually roost, the strongest males get the highest branches and the 'women' are shoved out to the edge of tiny branches.   

......as it should be!   {{{ducks}}}  LOL

Not ducks, SWALLOWS, silly :chairbang:

Offline Oceander

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Offline Oceander

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Wonder how many birds fall to the ground with broken wings....from 'collisions'.

Does it provide a chance to cull the flock with 'survival of the fittest' maneuvers?

The reason...the narrator says earlier that when they eventually roost, the strongest males get the highest branches and the 'women' are shoved out to the edge of tiny branches.   

......as it should be!   {{{ducks}}}  LOL

Possibly, but I'm not sure how fit a species is if the guys kill off the girls by pushing the girls off the edges - makes the "birds and the bees" thingy a little harder to accomplish.  On the other hand, the, uh ... "happy" ... boys are probably quite pleased with the situation.

Offline DCPatriot

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They don't 'push' the girls off the limbs.

It's just a way they deal with a 'pecking order' {pun intended}

Lions and wolves have a pecking order for eating.   The strongest eat first.  LOL!
"It aint what you don't know that kills you.  It's what you know that aint so!" ...Theodore Sturgeon

"Journalism is about covering the news.  With a pillow.  Until it stops moving."    - Iowahawk

Offline Oceander

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They don't 'push' the girls off the limbs.

It's just a way they deal with a 'pecking order' {pun intended}

Lions and wolves have a pecking order for eating.   The strongest eat first.  LOL!

True enough; but male lions are turned out of their maternal prides early, fend for themselves while bachelors, and get into some rather ugly fights with each other.  That would seem to even out the apparent disparity.  Also, lions need a large amount of territory to feed themselves, so the overall species is structured as a series of small social groups that rarely interact with each other - certainly not on a daily basis - so the degree to which the females as a group are pushed over the edge is much smaller than amongst the situation as described with the starlings.

On the other hand, the amount of resources, including the time and attention of a parent, needed to create an adult starling - one who can reproduce - is much less, on a per capita basis, than the resources needed to create an adult lion capable of reproducing, so the species as a whole suffers less from the loss of each individual member than the species of lions suffers from the loss of an individual member.


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