Author Topic: Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles  (Read 1264 times)

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famousdayandyear

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Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles
« on: January 19, 2013, 12:00:49 PM »
AP  DAVID GINSBURG

BALTIMORE -- Earl Weaver, the fiery Hall of Fame manager who won 1,480 games with the Baltimore Orioles, has died, the team says. He was 82.



The Duke of Earl, as he was affectionately known in Baltimore, took the Orioles into the World Series four times over 17 seasons but won only one title, in 1970. His .583 winning percentage ranks fifth among managers who served 10 or more seasons in the 20th century.

"He was an intense competitor and smart as a whip when it comes to figuring out ways to beat you," said Davey Johnson, who played under Weaver in the minor leagues and with the Orioles from 1965 to 1972.

Weaver was a salty-tongued manager who preferred to wait for a three-run homer rather than manufacture a run with a stolen base or a bunt. While some baseball purists argued that strategy, no one could dispute the results.

Weaver had a reputation as a winner, but umpires knew him as a hothead. Weaver would often turn his hat backward and yell directly into an umpire's face to argue a call or a rule, and after the inevitable ejection he would more often than not kick dirt on home plate or on the umpire's shoes.

He was ejected 91 times, including once in both games of a doubleheader.

Asked once if his reputation might have harmed his chances to gain entry into the Hall of Fame, Weaver admitted, "It probably hurt me."

Those 91 ejections were overshadowed by his five 100-win seasons, six AL East titles and four pennants. Weaver was inducted into the Hall in 1996, 10 years after he managed his final game with Baltimore at the end of an ill-advised comeback.

In 1985, the Orioles' owner at the time, Edward B. Williams, coaxed Weaver away from golf to take over a struggling squad. Weaver donned his uniform No. 4, which had already been retired by the team, and tried to breathe some life into the listless Orioles.

Baltimore went 53-52 over the last half of the 1985 season, but finished seventh in 1986 with a 73-89 record. It was Weaver's only losing season as a major-league manager, and he retired for good after that.

"If I hadn't come back," Weaver said after his final game, "I would be home thinking what it would have been like to manage again. I found out it's work."

Weaver finished with a 1,480-1,060 record. He won Manager of the Year three times.

"I had a successful career, not necessarily a Hall of Fame career, but a successful one," he said.

Weaver came to the Orioles as a first base coach in 1968, took over as manager on July 11 and went on to become the winningest manager in the history of the franchise.

He knew almost everything about the game. He was also a great judge of human character, and that's one of the main reasons why he was loved by a vast majority of his players even though he often rode them mercilessly from spring training into October.

"His bark was worse than his bite, but you had to know him and kind of grow up with him, and then you loved him like a father," Johnson said. "He was a used-car salesman in the minor leagues during the offseason, so he learned a lot of ways to sell you on just about anything."

Pat Dobson, who pitched two seasons under Weaver, said, "Certainly, the years I played for him were the two most enjoyable years I've had."

During games Weaver smoked cigarettes in the tunnel leading to the dugout and he never kicked the habit. He suffered a mild heart attack in August 1998, and the Orioles' manager at the time, Ray Miller, wondered aloud how his mentor was holding up.

"I wouldn't want to talk to him if he hasn't had a cigarette in 10 days," Miller joked. "They've probably got him tied to a chair."

Weaver was a brilliant manager, but he never made it to the majors as a player. He finally quit after spending 13 years as a second baseman in the St. Louis organization.

"He talked about how he could drive in 100 runs a year, score 100 runs and never make an error," Johnson said. "He said he never got to the big leagues because the Cardinals had too many good players in front of him."
« Last Edit: January 19, 2013, 12:01:47 PM by famousdayandyear »

Offline Scottftlc

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Re: Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2013, 12:57:35 PM »
RIP Earl Weaver.  He managed some of the greatest teams ever assembled during that 1965-72 period.  And he was a character.  Not only did he have some of the greatest World Series winning teams...he had one of the most famous World Series losing teams during that great run when his juggernaut Orioles team of 1969 lost to Tom Seaver and the Amazin' Mets.
Well, George Lewis told the Englishman, the Italian and the Jew
You can't open your mind, boys, to every conceivable point of view

...Bob Dylan

Offline PzLdr

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Re: Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2013, 01:36:49 PM »
Although I've been a die-hard Yankees fan all my life, I always liked Weaver. He was a GREAT manager, and one of baseball's GREAT characters. I'll miss him. Rest in Peace, Mr. Weaver.  :patriot:
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Offline DCPatriot

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Re: Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2013, 03:29:37 PM »
Oh wow!   82 years old?   He looked 82 back in the 80's!

And he died on a ship during the Orioles' annual Fantasy Baseball Cruise.

Earl was the second greatest manager of all time.  (Casey Stengel) 

Read that during a late inning home game where "...everything was too quiet", according to Earl.....that seeing a guy get called OUT sliding into 2nd base, he stormed out of the dugout, starting wildly kicking 2nd base and appearing like he's screaming at the ump....hat turned around, he said to him, "We're all going to Little Italy after the game.  Hope you can join us!" 

He said he had to shake things up....everybody was going to sleep.


« Last Edit: January 19, 2013, 03:56:58 PM by DCPatriot »
"It aint what you don't know that kills you.  It's what you know that aint so!" ...Theodore Sturgeon

"Journalism is about covering the news.  With a pillow.  Until it stops moving."    - Iowahawk

famousdayandyear

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Re: Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2013, 04:20:14 PM »

A baseball game is simply a nervous breakdown divided into nine innings.~Earl Weaver

Offline DCPatriot

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Re: Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2013, 05:34:59 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWQbN0jFo_k" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWQbN0jFo_k</a>
"It aint what you don't know that kills you.  It's what you know that aint so!" ...Theodore Sturgeon

"Journalism is about covering the news.  With a pillow.  Until it stops moving."    - Iowahawk

famousdayandyear

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Re: Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2013, 07:43:08 PM »
Nice to see a your posting, DC, so appropriate to the occasion and the place.

"What is seen (heard), cannot be unseen (unheard)"

Offline DCPatriot

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Re: Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2013, 10:27:31 PM »
Like it or not, that 'interview' is part of Ken Burns' documentary and part of Weaver's legacy.

I apologize for providing the 'unbleeped' version.
"It aint what you don't know that kills you.  It's what you know that aint so!" ...Theodore Sturgeon

"Journalism is about covering the news.  With a pillow.  Until it stops moving."    - Iowahawk

famousdayandyear

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Re: Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2013, 10:58:28 PM »
Like it or not, that 'interview' is part of Ken Burns' documentary and part of Weaver's legacy.

I apologize for providing the 'unbleeped' version.

No apology necessary, DC.  Fielder's choice.

Offline DCPatriot

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Re: Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2013, 06:25:02 AM »
Quote

"Earl was a black and white manager,'' former O's ace and Hall of Fame member Jim Palmer said Saturday. "He kind of told you what your job description was going to be and kind of basically told you if you wanted to play on the Orioles, this was what you needed to do. And if you couldn't do it, I'll get someone else. I know that's kind of tough love, but I don't think anyone other than Marianna, his wife, would describe Earl as a warm and fuzzy guy.''


Quote

"No one managed a ballclub or pitching staff better than Earl,'' said Johnson, who manages the Washington Nationals, and ran the Orioles from 1996-97. "He was decades ahead of his time. Not a game goes by that I don't draw on something Earl did or said. I will miss him every day.''




http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/mlb/news/20130119/earl-weaver-orioles.ap/?sct=hp_t2_a4&eref=sihp

« Last Edit: January 20, 2013, 06:34:35 AM by DCPatriot »
"It aint what you don't know that kills you.  It's what you know that aint so!" ...Theodore Sturgeon

"Journalism is about covering the news.  With a pillow.  Until it stops moving."    - Iowahawk

Offline Saltbag

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Re: Earl Weaver Dead At 82: Hall of Fame Manager of Orioles
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2013, 09:26:14 AM »
I grew up in Baltimore with Earl Weaver leading the O's. RIP Earl.  You will be missed.
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