Author Topic: Gardening in a Drought  (Read 2015 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline EC

  • Shanghaied Editor
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 23,836
  • Cats rule. Dogs drool.
Gardening in a Drought
« on: November 12, 2012, 02:41:37 AM »
The universe doesn't hate you. Unless your name is Tsutomu Yamaguchi

Avatar courtesy of Oceander

I've got a website now: Smoke and Ink

Offline Ford289HiPo

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 987
  • Don't take life seriously; No one gets out alive
Re: Gardening in a Drought
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2012, 05:43:52 PM »
I use raised beds for my plants, and have a frame covering the entire garden covered with a shade cloth. Watering is accomplished by drip sprayers dropping down from and overhead PVC pipe. It gives the effect of a gentle rain.
I've tried drippers watering the plants directly, but encountered too many problems with tripping over the lines.
I wonder when the lies will stop and truth begin, even as grim as the truth may be. And then I remember that for 70 years, the reign of terror in Russia called itself "the people's government." We have so far to fall, yet we are falling fast and Hell yawns to receive us.

Offline volunbeer

  • Optimistically paranoid
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 26
Re: Gardening in a Drought
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2012, 07:40:54 PM »
Research hugelkultur and Sepp Holzer (sp?).  There is also a great video online called Back to Eden.  It is a bit preachy, but the guy has obviously been very successful with woodchip gardening although he does not tell you it takes many years to get there.  They get very little rainfall where he is at. 

We are trying to build a similar garden about 2/3rds of an acre big, but we are only one year into the project.  I think it will take us about 3-4 more years to get there.  The garden is doing well now, but it still takes too much water! 
Don't worry America... out kids will pay for it!

Offline AbaraXas

  • ?? ??????? ?????
  • Social Media Advisor
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 13,214
  • Words full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.
Re: Gardening in a Drought
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2012, 08:28:08 PM »
Check out the "Keyhole Garden". This is popular in Africa, especially Ethopia. It maximizes resources and nutrients. I am attaching a .pdf file with instructions. One of these gardens is supposed to be able to continuously feed a family using minimizing water use and space.





[attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: November 12, 2012, 08:28:26 PM by AbaraXas »

Offline volunbeer

  • Optimistically paranoid
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 26
Re: Gardening in a Drought
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2012, 08:42:32 PM »
The Keyhole garden is pretty neat!  I was debating trying something similar using straw bales for the walls combining my love of compost worms with gardening.   Our current garden consists of vermitrenches built like large worm bins (real large).  The worm population has done very well and everything cooked down nicely.  I am putting a heavy layer of fall leaves on all of the garden beds and also collect lots of used coffee grounds to pour on top. 

I went pretty deep digging the trenches out of the clay with the tractor.  Thankfully, I had large piles of compostable materials to line the trenches with before adding pure manure (horse/cow) on top.  They are roughly 40ftx6ft wide and the trenches are close to 3 feet deep.  We liberally applied woodchips, cardboard, grass clippings, and pine needles on the pathways and the clay is just eating that stuff.  Hopefully after a few years we will be able to plant anywhere in the garden with success. 

:beer:
Don't worry America... out kids will pay for it!

Offline Ford289HiPo

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 987
  • Don't take life seriously; No one gets out alive
Re: Gardening in a Drought
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2012, 09:07:46 PM »
The Keyhole garden is pretty neat!  I was debating trying something similar using straw bales for the walls combining my love of compost worms with gardening.   Our current garden consists of vermitrenches built like large worm bins (real large).  The worm population has done very well and everything cooked down nicely.  I am putting a heavy layer of fall leaves on all of the garden beds and also collect lots of used coffee grounds to pour on top. 

I went pretty deep digging the trenches out of the clay with the tractor.  Thankfully, I had large piles of compostable materials to line the trenches with before adding pure manure (horse/cow) on top.  They are roughly 40ftx6ft wide and the trenches are close to 3 feet deep.  We liberally applied woodchips, cardboard, grass clippings, and pine needles on the pathways and the clay is just eating that stuff.  Hopefully after a few years we will be able to plant anywhere in the garden with success. 

:beer:

You may find that your amendments will be effective in a lot shorter period. I garden in pure horse manure. Last years pile has already broken down into a nice loam. The plants love it.
I wonder when the lies will stop and truth begin, even as grim as the truth may be. And then I remember that for 70 years, the reign of terror in Russia called itself "the people's government." We have so far to fall, yet we are falling fast and Hell yawns to receive us.

Offline volunbeer

  • Optimistically paranoid
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 26
Re: Gardening in a Drought
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2012, 09:30:22 PM »
Manure is my favorite soil amendment.  I can never get enough of it!  If I can find a decent used trailer that can haul about 5000 pounds at a time I would have even more of it.   I lucked out and found a guy with a 20 yard manure spreader truck a few miles away.  They have a dairy farm and he has to get rid of the manure so the county does not fine him for the watershed.  100 bucks a truckload and it usually burns down to about 8 yards of rich black soil.  I can increase the mileage by adding cardboard, leaves, and old straw or hay.  I even made a batch this year with a bunch of composted pine needles and woodchips.  I only get a yard at a time using my utility trailer answering craigslist ads and found a few folks that will deliver it just to get rid of it.   

Don't worry America... out kids will pay for it!

Offline Ford289HiPo

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 987
  • Don't take life seriously; No one gets out alive
Re: Gardening in a Drought
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2012, 09:02:06 PM »
Manure is my favorite soil amendment.  I can never get enough of it!  If I can find a decent used trailer that can haul about 5000 pounds at a time I would have even more of it.   I lucked out and found a guy with a 20 yard manure spreader truck a few miles away.  They have a dairy farm and he has to get rid of the manure so the county does not fine him for the watershed.  100 bucks a truckload and it usually burns down to about 8 yards of rich black soil.  I can increase the mileage by adding cardboard, leaves, and old straw or hay.  I even made a batch this year with a bunch of composted pine needles and woodchips.  I only get a yard at a time using my utility trailer answering craigslist ads and found a few folks that will deliver it just to get rid of it.   



I've been picking it up from a local rancher with my little 5 x 6ft trailer. I get about 1500lbs per load. I once lucked out and paid a neighbor to pick up 3 tons for me. That filled a 10ft x 10ft x 12" high bed.
One problem that I have noticed is that my tomato plants don't grow well. They act like there is an herbicide in the manure, but everything else grows fine, even weeds.
I'd love to get 20 yards of manure in one load! That's a lot of sh*t!  :laugh:
I wonder when the lies will stop and truth begin, even as grim as the truth may be. And then I remember that for 70 years, the reign of terror in Russia called itself "the people's government." We have so far to fall, yet we are falling fast and Hell yawns to receive us.


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf