Author Topic: WH: Keystone Pipeline exempt from "buy American rule" After Ex-Foreign Steel Exec Became Commerce Secretary (new swamp)  (Read 1103 times)

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geronl

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@AbaraXas

Huge conflict of interest going on here

Offline AbaraXas

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@AbaraXas

Huge conflict of interest going on here

What's a little quid pro quo between friends?

geronl

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The Philippine trade Envoy to DC is a huge business partner of Trumps. Duterte knows how to play Trump.

Online Oceander

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Putting the "crony" back into crony capitalism.

Offline LateForLunch

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« Last Edit: March 06, 2017, 03:54:14 PM by LateForLunch »
GOTWALMA Get out of the way and leave me alone! (Nods to General Teebone)

Offline Hondo69

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BTW, you folks may not have noticed, but the  U.S.steel industry production has declined horribly in the last few decades to the point where our own domestic suppliers may well not have been able to provide the needed materials at a competitive price at the same quality. So the decision to exempt the company may have absolutely nothing to do with anything nefarious or untoward.

I wonder what the folks living in Pittsburgh think of this arrangement?

If you will remember there was a time when U.S. steel producers were screaming bloody murder about Japan flooding the market with "cheap Jap steel".  Prices for U.S. made steel had become so high the Japanese could buy the raw materials from the U.S., ship them half way around the world, produce the steel and then ship them all the way back again all at lower overall prices. 

It's stunning to think that could possibly be true.  Which begs the question: why had U.S. steel prices become exorbitantly high in the first place?


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