Author Topic: The Election of 1860  (Read 511 times)

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Offline rangerrebew

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The Election of 1860
« on: February 13, 2017, 02:08:29 PM »
  The Election of 1860

Douglas Campaign Ticket
Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War, Virginia Center for Digital History, University of Virginia
This Democratic ticket from Staunton, VA, showing Douglas as the party nominee is unusual because Douglas wasn't shown as the nominee for the Democratic Party in most of the South.

The Democrats met in Charleston, South Carolina, in April 1860 to select their candidate for President in the upcoming election. It was turmoil. Northern democrats felt that Stephen Douglas had the best chance to defeat the "Black Republicans." Although an ardent supporter of slavery, southern Democrats considered Douglas a traitor because of his support of popular sovereignty, permitting territories to choose not to have slavery. Southern democrats stormed out of the convention, without choosing a candidate. Six weeks later, the northern Democrats chose Douglas, while at a separate convention the Southern Democrats nominated then Vice-President John C. Breckenridge.

http://www.ushistory.org/us/32d.asp
« Last Edit: February 13, 2017, 02:09:13 PM by rangerrebew »
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Public virtue cannot exist in a nation without private, and public virtue is the only foundation of republics. There must be a positive passion for the public good, the public interest, honour, power and glory, established in the minds of the people, or there can be no republican government, nor any real liberty: and this public passion must be superior to all private passions. John Adams

Online Smokin Joe

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Re: The Election of 1860
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2017, 10:50:57 PM »

Nominees    Electoral Vote    Popular Vote
     Presidential    Vice Presidential
    Republican    winner    Abraham Lincoln    Hannibal Hamlin    180    59.4%    1,865,908    39.9%
    Southern Democratic         John Breckenridge    Joseph Lane    72    23.8%    848,019    18.1%
    Constitutional Union         John Bell    Edward Everett    39    12.9%    590,901     12.6%
    Democratic         Stephen Douglas    Herschel Johnson    12    4.0%    1,380,202    29.5%
Four people voted for Lincoln in the County I came from (white, male, 21, and a property owner). They were asked to leave.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2017, 10:53:16 PM by Smokin Joe »
How God must weep at humans' folly! Stand fast! God knows what he is doing!

And I looked, and rose up, and said unto the nobles, and to the rulers, and to the rest of the people, Be not ye afraid of them: remember the Lord, which is great and terrible, and fight for your brethren, your sons, and your daughters, your wives, and your houses. Nehemiah 4:14 (KJV)

Well, here we go! Hang on kiddies, it could be one heckuva ride!

Offline Hondo69

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Re: The Election of 1860
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2017, 09:32:06 AM »
Very interesting - damn shame we don't study history much in this country.  Lots of valuable lessons to be learned.

http://www.ushistory.org/us/32d.asp

Quote
With four candidates in the field, Lincoln received only 40% of the popular vote and 180 electoral votes — enough to narrowly win the crowded election. This meant that 60% of the voters selected someone other than Lincoln. With the results tallied, the question was, would the South accept the outcome? A few weeks after the election, South Carolina seceded from the Union.


According to the record books the Civil War officially began in 1861.  But if you lived in Missouri or the Kansas Territory you'd been experiencing all out war for for seven full years by 1861. 

Quantrill's Raiders
James J. (Jim Crow) Chiles
Kansas Red Legs
Jayhawkers

The 1850's are referred to as "bleeding Kansas" in this area but there was a lot of bleeding in Missouri as well.  Both the state and federal governments experimented with a number of solutions that only made matters worse.  Union soldiers would sweep through sections of Missouri taking what they wanted, burning down the houses and barns, and shooting any remaining livestock.  Thousands of people were displaced. 

By the time 1861 rolled around and the Civil War was official nationwide bloodshed was nothing new to those in the western territories.

Online Smokin Joe

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Re: The Election of 1860
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2017, 02:32:39 PM »
Very interesting - damn shame we don't study history much in this country.  Lots of valuable lessons to be learned.

http://www.ushistory.org/us/32d.asp

According to the record books the Civil War officially began in 1861.  But if you lived in Missouri or the Kansas Territory you'd been experiencing all out war for for seven full years by 1861. 

Quantrill's Raiders
James J. (Jim Crow) Chiles
Kansas Red Legs
Jayhawkers

The 1850's are referred to as "bleeding Kansas" in this area but there was a lot of bleeding in Missouri as well.  Both the state and federal governments experimented with a number of solutions that only made matters worse.  Union soldiers would sweep through sections of Missouri taking what they wanted, burning down the houses and barns, and shooting any remaining livestock.  Thousands of people were displaced. 

By the time 1861 rolled around and the Civil War was official nationwide bloodshed was nothing new to those in the western territories.
On the other 'front'...had Virginia acted faster, the war would have been different indeed. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltimore_riot_of_1861
How God must weep at humans' folly! Stand fast! God knows what he is doing!

And I looked, and rose up, and said unto the nobles, and to the rulers, and to the rest of the people, Be not ye afraid of them: remember the Lord, which is great and terrible, and fight for your brethren, your sons, and your daughters, your wives, and your houses. Nehemiah 4:14 (KJV)

Well, here we go! Hang on kiddies, it could be one heckuva ride!

Online Bigun

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Re: The Election of 1860
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2017, 02:41:21 PM »
On the other 'front'...had Virginia acted faster, the war would have been different indeed. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltimore_riot_of_1861

 :amen: And there were other lost opportunities as well.
“It is difficult to free fools from the chains they revere.” —Voltaire

Offline Hondo69

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Re: The Election of 1860
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2017, 03:46:11 PM »
On the other 'front'...had Virginia acted faster, the war would have been different indeed. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltimore_riot_of_1861

Thank for posting that link.  I had never heard of that incident before.

Little by little I'm learning a lot.

Online Smokin Joe

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Re: The Election of 1860
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2017, 05:25:36 PM »
Thank for posting that link.  I had never heard of that incident before.

Little by little I'm learning a lot.
The so called 'border' states, while on the border, had definite sentiments either statewide, or by region. Virginia was divided during the war and West Virginia carved out of the state, for instance. The mountains formed a very real barrier to transportation, not to mention troop movements.

The union blockade of Southern ports was designed to keep the South from engaging in what could have been serious commerce with Europe, not only to finance the war effort, but that would have established diplomatic ties as well with European nations which could have ended up as military alliances as well. Dealing with the South would have simplified matters for the British, especially. (see Egyptian Indebtedness at this link:http://courses.wcupa.edu/jones/his312/lectures/egypt.htm). Preventing that trade was paramount to Union strategy (and reserving it primarily for northern cotton mills).

Trade between the North and South did not end with the war, either: https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/10/28/trading-with-the-enemy/?_r=0
How God must weep at humans' folly! Stand fast! God knows what he is doing!

And I looked, and rose up, and said unto the nobles, and to the rulers, and to the rest of the people, Be not ye afraid of them: remember the Lord, which is great and terrible, and fight for your brethren, your sons, and your daughters, your wives, and your houses. Nehemiah 4:14 (KJV)

Well, here we go! Hang on kiddies, it could be one heckuva ride!


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