Author Topic: Obituaries for 2017  (Read 45823 times)

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Offline sneakypete

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1400 on: September 09, 2017, 09:45:06 AM »
Everyone close to my age is dieing. I need to start hanging with a younger crowd.

@Wingnut

Ain't it the truth? My mama used to tell me the kids I was hanging with were a bad influence on me,and sure enough,it's becoming true.

Of course their mamas were telling them that *I* was a bad influence on them,which was obviously a lie.
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Offline catfish1957

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1401 on: September 09, 2017, 09:50:26 AM »
@Applewood

EVERY month is a bad month for old-timers.

Don't ask me how I know this.

And somehow Keith Richards and David Crosby live on
I display the Confederate Battle Flag in honor of my great great great grandfathers who spilled blood at Wilson's Creek and Shiloh.  5 others served in the WBTS with honor too.

Online Applewood

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1402 on: September 09, 2017, 10:13:17 AM »
And somehow Keith Richards and David Crosby live on

It's the massive quantities of drugs they have ingested over the years.  Acrually, they are both dead, but the drugs have kept them so well preserved, some guy behind the stage can animate them to make it appear they are moving/singing/playing.

Offline goatprairie

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1403 on: September 09, 2017, 10:21:45 AM »
It's the massive quantities of drugs they have ingested over the years.  Acrually, they are both dead, but the drugs have kept them so well preserved, some guy behind the stage can animate them to make it appear they are moving/singing/playing.
I remember many years ago seeing a picture of Richards shortly after he had "recovered" from a heroin bout.  He literally looked like he had died and been dug up....zombie-like.
That was about forty years ago. How he's managed to keep on breathing after all these years is beyond me.

Online Applewood

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1404 on: September 09, 2017, 10:26:57 AM »
I remember many years ago seeing a picture of Richards shortly after he had "recovered" from a heroin bout.  He literally looked like he had died and been dug up....zombie-like.
That was about forty years ago. How he's managed to keep on breathing after all these years is beyond me.


One of my favorite Dave Barry columns:

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/950247/Stones-may-still-be-rolling-in-the-2060s.html

"Keith is not a health nut. His idea of taking care of his body is to occasionally play an entire song without smoking a cigarette. He has very deep facial creases: You expect at any moment to see a prairie dog poke its head out of his face, blink at the lights, then duck down again. Keith would not notice this. I'm pretty sure the Stones have a guy on a walkie-talkie somewhere, transmitting to Keith's earpiece, reminding him to blink.

The other Stones look healthier than Keith, but then so does the late Chairman Mao. This is not a pretty-boy band. If they've had any plastic surgery, it was apparently done at Home Depot."

 :silly:


Offline sneakypete

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1405 on: September 09, 2017, 10:38:30 AM »
I remember many years ago seeing a picture of Richards shortly after he had "recovered" from a heroin bout.  He literally looked like he had died and been dug up....zombie-like.
That was about forty years ago. How he's managed to keep on breathing after all these years is beyond me.

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The most recent report I have read on the adventures of Keef is that he had fallen out of a tree while drunk and trying to cut a coconut when they were prepping for a tour somewhere "in the islands".

On the day the world ends,it will only be populated by roaches and Keef.
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Offline Machiavelli

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1406 on: September 09, 2017, 10:49:14 AM »
Joe DeNucci, boxer and long-serving politician, dies at 78

Quote
Joe DeNucci, a former world class middleweight boxing contender who became a politician and the longest-serving state auditor in Massachusetts history, has died at age 78.

DeNucci, who had suffered from Alzheimer’s disease, died Friday at his home in Newton, where his death was confirmed by the Andrew J. Magni & Son Funeral Home.

In his boxing days he fought quality opponents including Emile Griffith, a world champion in multiple weight classes, before turning to the equally rough-and-tumble world of state politics. As a Democrat, he served as a state representative and later held the office of state auditor for 24 years.

More

Wikipedia

Boxing record

Wingnut

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1407 on: September 09, 2017, 02:57:08 PM »
@Wingnut

Ain't it the truth? My mama used to tell me the kids I was hanging with were a bad influence on me,and sure enough,it's becoming true.

Of course their mamas were telling them that *I* was a bad influence on them,which was obviously a lie.

I know.  How could they even think that!    :silly: :silly:
@sneakypete

Offline montanajoe

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1408 on: September 09, 2017, 11:21:26 PM »
Don Williams...RIP

I remember hearing an interview with him when asked why he never was on other singer's songs...he said "I'm not good enough for that"...


I think it was the choice of material, as a master storyteller seems to me he realized rightly that it would be impossible to do it any other way... 

http://www.rollingstone.com/country/lists/don-williams-10-essential-songs-w502068
« Last Edit: September 09, 2017, 11:31:16 PM by montanajoe »

Offline EasyAce

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1409 on: September 10, 2017, 04:36:33 PM »
By Yours Truly
http://throneberryfields.com/2017/09/10/gene-michael-rip-the-big-stick/


Paul O’Neill (far left) and Gene Michael (next to O’Neill) with, from left, head trainer Gene Monahan, Joe Torre, Tino
Martinez, David Cone, Mariano Rivera, and Jorge Posada, when O’Neill—for whom Michael dealt to begin building
the Yankees’ 1996-2000 dynasty —was presented his Monument Park plaque.


You could say the Yankees’ fabled Core Five dynasty wouldn’t have happened if Gene Michael—the
Yankee general manager who was inadvertently allowed to build it, and who died of a heart attack
7 September at 79—hadn’t had something in common with Phil Rizzuto, other than being Yankee
shortstops a couple of generations apart.

They also shared a phobia about creepy, crawly creatures. Michael’s got him into George Steinbrenner’s
sights early and often, when Steinbrenner was a newly-minted Yankee owner and Michael his slick
field/slack hit shortstop in 1973.

As the Yankees began pre-game practise in Texas, Steinbrenner was astonished to see Michael running
onto the field as if he had a tax auditor on his trail, flinging his glove up frantically, with a hot dog falling
from one of the fingers. Like Rizzuto in his playing days, Michael’s teammates took to making him pay
through the proverbial nose for his phobia. Except that Steinbrenner was now the Boss, and he wanted
Michael disciplined to within an inch of the skinny shortstop’s life.

Manager Ralph Houk, stifling his laughter, was forced to tell Michael he wasn’t just in Steinbrenner’s
dog house, he was in the Boss’s dog pound. But Steinbrenner keeping a close eye on the veteran
nicknamed the Stick turned into something else, when he realised Michael had a rare baseball intelligence
that belied his puny playing statistics.

In due course, that intelligence would lead Michael as general manager to make the trade and the four
draft signings that seeded the Yankees’ return to greatness from the mid-1990s through the early
Aughts.

When Michael called it a career as a player in 1976, Steinbrenner made him a scout, then coach, then
minor league manager, then major league manager. Oops. Succeeding Dick Howser after 1980, and a
season as GM in which he seemed to spend more than half his time buffering between Howser and the
Boss, Michael spent one full season and part of another season in what was then the baseball job most
likely to be considered a violation of its holder’s Eighth Amendment rights.

“When you become his manager,” Michael once cracked, “it’s like your IQ drops by fifty percent. All of
a sudden you don’t know anything.”

Steinbrenner invited Michael back to the front office after canning him as manager. Michael demurred,
saying he still thought he was a good manager. “Sure you are,” Steinbrenner agreed. “But why would
you want to stay as manager and be second-guessed by me, when you can come up into the front
office and be one of the second-guessers?”

Michael eventually got another crack at being the Yankees’ general manager, and the timing couldn’t
have been more bizarre. Steinbrenner went into drydock on the orders of then-commissioner Fay
Vincent, after he’d recklessly and foolishly been caught paying off small-time con Howard Spira to
dig up any kind of dirt diggable on outfielder and future Hall of Famer Dave Winfield.

Most tellingly, Michael—who thought nothing of standing up to Steinbrenner’s illogic and seat-of-his-
pants rantings, ravings, and reductionisms no matter which job he held in the Yankee circus—proved
both an astute trader and a master of knowing which trade not to make. Doing both helped return
the Yankees from the Twilight Zone to the next best thing to their 1950s dominance.

First, Michael went against the front office consensus about Roberto Kelly. The front office saw Kelly
as their center fielder of the future as the 1990s began. They loved his power/speed combination and
couldn’t figure out why he hadn’t become the superstar he was supposed to be in his first four Yankee
years.

Michael saw the flaw that answered that question and would keep Kelly from becoming that superstar:
he was an undisciplined hitter who was likely to remain that way. And he also had a taker in Cincinnati,
where then-manager Lou Piniella—formerly a Yankee teammate of Michael’s and twice a Yankee revolving-
door manager—was exhausted of fencing with his talented right fielder Paul O’Neill.

Piniella wanted to turn the disciplined but severely self-critical O’Neill into a pull-hitting 40-bomb a year
man, and his insistence upon it turned O’Neill into a wreck. After Piniella left the Reds to manage the
Mariners, Michael and Reds GM Jim Bowden made the deal. Yankee personnel who fumed over it (and
Steinbrenner, even suspended, wasn’t one of them) were reminded politely that the Yankees had a
better center fielder in waiting, Bernie Williams.

“When I got to New York, he told me they wanted me to play the way I played,” O’Neill remembered
in a New York Post commentary upon Michael’s death, “and even though Yankee Stadium was a pull-
hitter’s stadium I could hit the way I did. He gave me the biggest opportunity of my life.”

O’Neill became the Yankees’ right field fixture and one of the team’s spiritual leaders for the final nine
years of his career. Michael waved away periodic criticism of Williams, concurrently, including orders
from Steinbrenner to trade him. Somehow, Michael kept Steinbrenner at bay just long enough to
move veteran outfielder Mel Hall after he saw Hall bully the resilient and sensitive Williams mercilessly
and once too often.

Williams and O’Neill became outfield fixtures while Michael drafted Derek Jeter, Andy Pettitte, Jorge
Posada, and Mariano Rivera. Married to fellow Yankee farm product Williams, they became the Core
Five who—with a little help from such friends as O’Neill, Tino Martinez, Scott Brosius, David Cone,
and Roger Clemens—drove the Yankees back to greatness, to four World Series rings in five seasons,
and to a refreshed rivalry with the Red Sox in the American League East.

The bad news was that Michael wouldn’t be in the GM’s seat to see the beginning of that Yankee
resurrection. As had happened after the 1981 strike, Michael was fired as GM after the 1994 strike
was resolved in early 1995. Why? The Yankees slumped after both were resolved, and somebody
had to take the fall, especially with Michael haggling with the Boss over a new contract.

Bob Watson and then Brian Cashman succeeded Michael, but those 1996 and 1998-2000 World Series
winners were Michael’s teams. “I always had a great regard for his baseball knowledge, and secondly,
how he handled the stress working for George that many years,” said Joe Torre, who managed those
winners en route the Hall of Fame himself. “He kept the thing afloat when George was away; he did
more than that because he built a heck of an organization.”

“He was a mentor to many people in this office,” Cashman said upon Michael’s death. “He would take
the time and pass the baton. He did it with me and plenty others. If you were interested, he would
give his time and expertise to try and train you. He was a remarkable individual who was impactful.”

Divorced and remarried with four children, Michael knew a few things about balance, including between
statistics and sight. “Numbers are important,” he once said, “only to the degree you can blend them
with what a scout has seen with his own eyes.”

“He knew the game of baseball like few others did,” said Yankee owner Hal Steinbrenner, “and was
always willing and excited to talk about it with anyone in earshot.” Count me among those who’d
have loved to be within earshot whenever the Stick decided to swing about the game he loved.
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« Last Edit: September 10, 2017, 04:38:11 PM by EasyAce »

Online jmyrlefuller

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1410 on: September 11, 2017, 01:01:08 PM »
Don Ohlmeyer, television executive for NBC and ABC, dies at 72

Ohlmeyer began his career at ABC in the late 1960s, working under Roone Arledge. An innovator throughout his career, the success of his ideas varied widely. Monday Night Football and The Superstars went on to become major institutions. His attempt to air a football game without announcers was not.

By the 1990s, Ohlmeyer had lost much of his creative touch. After a feud with Norm MacDonald in 1998 (as the story goes, Ohlmeyer was close friends with O.J. Simpson and, after MacDonald asserted he was guilty, fired him from Saturday Night Live and refused to run ads for his upcoming movie Dirty Work on NBC), he was forced into retirement. He was lured back to ABC in 2000 to try to revive Monday Night Football, but many of his oddball suggestions (using nicknames like "Fins" and "Skins" to identify teams in on-screen graphics, and hiring Dennis Miller as a color analyst) backfired and, admitting he had made a grave mistake, he was gone after one year.

Ohlmeyer spent the last years of his career as a professor at Pepperdine University, and spent a year as ESPN's ombudsman. A chronic alcoholic and smoker for most of his life, he died of an unspecified form of cancer September 10.

Obituary from the New York Times

Wikipedia
"Just because people in positions of authority are stupid, it doesn’t mean you have to go along with it." —Arlo Guthrie

“No government program ever dies of its own accord.” ―unknown

Yes, folks, it's possible for a person to live by their own moral standards. Not every good Christian is a hypocrite.

Offline goatprairie

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1411 on: September 11, 2017, 02:39:20 PM »
Don Ohlmeyer, television executive for NBC and ABC, dies at 72

Ohlmeyer began his career at ABC in the late 1960s, working under Roone Arledge. An innovator throughout his career, the success of his ideas varied widely. Monday Night Football and The Superstars went on to become major institutions. His attempt to air a football game without announcers was not.

By the 1990s, Ohlmeyer had lost much of his creative touch. After a feud with Norm MacDonald in 1998 (as the story goes, Ohlmeyer was close friends with O.J. Simpson and, after MacDonald asserted he was guilty, fired him from Saturday Night Live and refused to run ads for his upcoming movie Dirty Work on NBC), he was forced into retirement. He was lured back to ABC in 2000 to try to revive Monday Night Football, but many of his oddball suggestions (using nicknames like "Fins" and "Skins" to identify teams in on-screen graphics, and hiring Dennis Miller as a color analyst) backfired and, admitting he had made a grave mistake, he was gone after one year.

Ohlmeyer spent the last years of his career as a professor at Pepperdine University, and spent a year as ESPN's ombudsman. A chronic alcoholic and smoker for most of his life, he died of an unspecified form of cancer September 10.

Obituary from the New York Times

Wikipedia
I remember the announcer-less football games with subtitles.  It was an experiment that failed.  I guess a number of people had wondered how the games would seem if they didn't have the gabbing announcers and color men.
Another thought is the idea that when you go to a game in person, there are no play by play announcers (unless you're also listening to a radio), and they were trying to recreate the feeling.
Nevertheless,  watching a game on tv is not quite the same as being there.  I guess people really do like  talkers during the game as they're watching it on tv. The sensation I had was that it was weird without the yakkers.

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1412 on: September 12, 2017, 12:02:36 AM »
RIP

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txjrVXONBVE" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txjrVXONBVE</a>
« Last Edit: September 12, 2017, 07:44:25 PM by Wingnut »

Wingnut

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1413 on: September 12, 2017, 12:10:40 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T37UqfkmuY8" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T37UqfkmuY8</a>
« Last Edit: September 12, 2017, 07:49:47 PM by Wingnut »

Wingnut

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1414 on: September 12, 2017, 12:17:24 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iSf8wxEttk" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iSf8wxEttk</a>
« Last Edit: September 12, 2017, 07:50:18 PM by Wingnut »

Wingnut

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1415 on: September 12, 2017, 12:25:46 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-S-PaMWhwI" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-S-PaMWhwI</a>
« Last Edit: September 12, 2017, 07:51:24 PM by Wingnut »

Wingnut

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1416 on: September 12, 2017, 12:34:26 AM »
This sucks.
One of my favorite bands...
I don't think there's any coming back from this one.  **nononono*

Fade to black.
RIP Indeed.

 :amen:
« Last Edit: September 12, 2017, 07:51:45 PM by Wingnut »

Wingnut

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1417 on: September 12, 2017, 12:36:58 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoPg1EG2AKk" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoPg1EG2AKk</a>
« Last Edit: September 12, 2017, 07:52:03 PM by Wingnut »

Online Smokin Joe

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1418 on: September 12, 2017, 04:31:57 PM »
This sucks.
One of my favorite bands...
I don't think there's any coming back from this one.  **nononono*

Fade to black.
RIP Indeed.
We survived that plane crash (as did Waylon), we'll get through this, too. Still, RIP.
How God must weep at humans' folly! Stand fast! God knows what he is doing!
Seventeen Techniques for Truth Suppression
And I looked, and rose up, and said unto the nobles, and to the rulers, and to the rest of the people, Be not ye afraid of them: remember the Lord, which is great and terrible, and fight for your brethren, your sons, and your daughters, your wives, and your houses. Nehemiah 4:14 (KJV)

About the only "Big" Liberals don't revile is "Big Government"

Online Smokin Joe

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1419 on: September 12, 2017, 05:57:52 PM »
Oh, you read me wrong @Smokin Joe ... I know we'll go on. Heck it don't even matter in the big scheme.

I meant Montgomery Gentry is done... I don't think that will go any further... And that's too bad.

But yeah... RIP.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tr-BYVeCv6U" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tr-BYVeCv6U</a>
How God must weep at humans' folly! Stand fast! God knows what he is doing!
Seventeen Techniques for Truth Suppression
And I looked, and rose up, and said unto the nobles, and to the rulers, and to the rest of the people, Be not ye afraid of them: remember the Lord, which is great and terrible, and fight for your brethren, your sons, and your daughters, your wives, and your houses. Nehemiah 4:14 (KJV)

About the only "Big" Liberals don't revile is "Big Government"

Online Freya

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1420 on: September 13, 2017, 04:58:29 AM »
G-d bless America. G-d bless us all

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Online Applewood

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1421 on: September 13, 2017, 10:13:44 AM »
Her wife?  Sorry, but I can't get used to this he's my wife, she's my husband thing.  Bed partner might be more appropriate. 

Since I have nothing good to say about Miss Windsor, I won't say anything else.  She's in God's hands now.

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Online MajorClay

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1423 on: September 13, 2017, 07:01:25 PM »
RIP Pete

Online Applewood

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Re: Obituaries for 2017
« Reply #1424 on: September 13, 2017, 07:28:33 PM »
Frank Vincent, ‘Sopranos’ and ‘Goodfellas’ Actor, Dies at 78

Frank Vincent, known for portraying Phil Leotard on “The Sopranos,” has died, his “Sopranos” co-star Vincent Pastore announced on Facebook. He was 78.

TMZ reports that he died due to complications of heart surgery after a heart attack. John Gallagher, who directed Vincent in “Street Hunter,” “The Deli,” and “Animal Room,” also posted the news on Facebook.

Vincent began acting in 1976 when he co-starred in the low-budget crime film “The Death Collector” alongside Joe Pesci. Vincent then acted in Martin Scorsese’s “Raging Bull,” which sparked the first of many collaborations between Vincent, Pesci, and Robert De Niro, including “Goodfellas” and “Casino.”‘

More at:

http://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/celebrity/frank-vincent-%E2%80%98sopranos%E2%80%99-and-%E2%80%98goodfellas%E2%80%99-actor-dies-at-78/ar-AArTarY?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartandhp

and

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Vincent





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