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Offline mystery-ak

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« on: August 26, 2014, 09:31:59 AM »

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Offline alicewonders

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« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2014, 10:02:50 AM »
I have known several people with Downs Syndrome.  I wish everyone in the world were more like them.  They are the happiest people and every one of them has a smile that would light up a power plant!  How can you not be around someone like that and not feel happiness? 

So now we have this group-think that everyone has to be perfect.  A lot of divorce stems from this thinking - as soon as things gets difficult - they're out of there!  How many people spend their lives in depression because deep inside - they know they're not perfect

I do wonder about these parents that abort their baby because it has Downs Syndrome - what happens someday when their spouse or a child that they decide to let live is afflicted or suffers such trauma that they are wheelchair bound or confined to a bed permanently?  How do they cope with that magnitude of "imperfection"? 

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Offline EC

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« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2014, 10:06:49 AM »
God. Some of those comments are direct out of the "the kid is a fashion accessory" handbook.

How old were the people interviewed? I know that many Down's babies are born from very late pregnancies - late 40's usually. Can you in all conscience risk not being there for your child who needs masses of love and help to cope and fit in?

On the other hand, I've never met a person with Down's syndrome who wasn't totally loving and trusting and who has such a joy in life it's infectious. They make "normal" people look like a bunch of Grinches. There is one I know well. He's about 25, but mentally he's somewhere around 10 and will probably stay there. His father brings him into the pub on a Saturday for a meal, and he has to go and hug everyone in there, even the dog. It can be a little disconcerting for new customers.  :laugh:

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Offline alicewonders

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« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2014, 10:25:03 AM »
My husband's cousin has Downs Syndrome, he is in his sixties now and has had to move to a "home" because his elderly mother had to go into a nursing home.  It was like all of her life she had a child that loved her unconditionally, never talked back or got into any trouble - and was the joy and light of her life.  If you would ask her, she would say that she never regretted that he was not "perfect" by our society's shallow standards and that he enriched her life much more than she enriched his. 
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Offline EC

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« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2014, 11:18:03 AM »
Homes are good. We have them here - not to hide the Downs people away, but because most of the parents are too old now to do the 24/7 thing. They live, get respect and dignity, work if they are able to. It's such a wide ranging problem - there are some who work in machine shops. Some who work in supermarkets - I always get torn in the local Tescos when both the man with Down's and the deaf woman are on the tills at the same time. He is so neat, it's amazing. I have a bit of sign language and she gets a bit starved for conversation.
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Offline alicewonders

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« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2014, 11:55:59 AM »
Homes are good. We have them here - not to hide the Downs people away, but because most of the parents are too old now to do the 24/7 thing. They live, get respect and dignity, work if they are able to. It's such a wide ranging problem - there are some who work in machine shops. Some who work in supermarkets - I always get torn in the local Tescos when both the man with Down's and the deaf woman are on the tills at the same time. He is so neat, it's amazing. I have a bit of sign language and she gets a bit starved for conversation.

That's the thing that is so heartbreaking.  These people add so much to our day - they're a bright spot - a sunflower growing in the middle of a dump! 

One of the people that I love most of anyone in the world was mentally retarded.  He's passed away now.  He had an IQ of 80, was about seventy years old when I met him and he worked at a place where he filled plastic jugs with drinking water.  He would come in our shop everyday to visit with us.  He was just a ray of sunshine and I miss him so much. 

 8888crybaby
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