Author Topic: Are 97 of the nation's 100 poorest counties in red states?  (Read 3128 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online mystery-ak

  • Owner
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 260,230
Are 97 of the nation's 100 poorest counties in red states?
« on: July 29, 2014, 05:50:48 PM »

Support the USO

Offline aligncare

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 20,232
Re: Are 97 of the nation's 100 poorest counties in red states?
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2014, 06:31:36 PM »
Democrats have gall pushing this. Name one crumbling inner-city run by Republicans? Nuff said.

Online massadvj

  • Editorial Advisor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,228
    • Auktion Online
Re: Are 97 of the nation's 100 poorest counties in red states?
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2014, 07:32:25 PM »
I wonder how many people in rural Kentucky would like to trade places with those of inner Detroit?  Also, wouldn't it be interesting to see which party governs those areas where there is the greatest VARIANCE between rich and poor? 
"She only coughs when she lies."

Offline alicewonders

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 13,057
  • Live life-it's too short to butt heads w buttheads
Re: Are 97 of the nation's 100 poorest counties in red states?
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2014, 09:20:09 PM »
I wonder how many people in rural Kentucky would like to trade places with those of inner Detroit?  Also, wouldn't it be interesting to see which party governs those areas where there is the greatest VARIANCE between rich and poor? 

I can answer your question Victor, seeing that I live in one of those Appalachian counties on the map.  My county is white on the map, so we're not quite so "distressed" as the dark red ones, the county I was born in - and the county all of my kin are from, is orange on the map.  I am have been in most of those dark red counties, I've seen million dollar mansions sitting in the middle of some of the most splendidly beautiful acreage in God's country - and I've seen rusting trailers sitting on that same beautiful land as well.

As to your question, "I wonder how many people in rural Kentucky would like to trade places with those of inner Detroit?"  Hands down, I'd wager my life savings that only a very, very few would.  My mother's brother left the hills after he returned home from the Korean War to move his family to Detroit.  He got a job at General Motors and retired from there years ago.  He made good money, but through the years, he kept moving further and further from Detroit because it was getting worse and worse.  My cousins still live up there and they are having a rough time.

Conversely, the poor people in rural Kentucky live in places where it is safe for their children to play outside, where many of them grow their own vegetables, fruit, and raise their own animals for food.  They are good hunters and can feed their family from the game they kill.  Most all of them have guns and most teach their children how to use them properly.  For many of the adults, their parents live next door or close by - and the grandparents help with childcare if the parents are lucky enough to have a job (most of the good-paying coal jobs are being destroyed now).  When the parents age, they are lucky enough to have children and grandchildren close by to help take care of them.  Houses are cheaper there too. 

Many of them have "family cemeteries" up on the hill on their property and I imagine their children play among their ancestor's graves like my mother and father used to do when they were small children.  It gives you a sense of continuity and roots. 

Appalachia has always been poor, for several reasons - it's splendid isolation and richness in natural resources, which were exploited by the coal and timber barons. 

Also, my ancestors came to America in the 1600's.  They settled in Virginia, moving to North Carolina and then pushing the frontier with Daniel Boone being some of the earliest settlers in Eastern Kentucky.  They were true frontiersmen, and my grandfather used to tell me that they were seeking isolated land - they fought off Indians to keep that land too.

The reasons were varied, my Pappaw said his great great.....great grandfather came here from England because they wouldn't let him grow a beard!  My maternal grandmother's great great....great grandfather moved up in the mountains because he was running from the law - he didn't believe in paying property taxes. 

LBJ brought his War on Poverty to the area, and it just got even poorer. 

Even with all that, I wouldn't want to live anywhere else.           
« Last Edit: July 29, 2014, 09:23:54 PM by alicewonders »
Don't tread on me.   8888madkitty

We told you Trump would win - bigly!

Online Oceander

  • Technical
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 48,891
  • TBR Illuminati
Re: Are 97 of the nation's 100 poorest counties in red states?
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2014, 09:26:12 PM »
Democrats have gall pushing this. Name one crumbling inner-city run by Republicans? Nuff said.

Thank you.

Online massadvj

  • Editorial Advisor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,228
    • Auktion Online
Re: Are 97 of the nation's 100 poorest counties in red states?
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2014, 09:53:51 PM »
I can answer your question Victor, seeing that I live in one of those Appalachian counties on the map.  My county is white on the map, so we're not quite so "distressed" as the dark red ones, the county I was born in - and the county all of my kin are from, is orange on the map.  I am have been in most of those dark red counties, I've seen million dollar mansions sitting in the middle of some of the most splendidly beautiful acreage in God's country - and I've seen rusting trailers sitting on that same beautiful land as well.

As to your question, "I wonder how many people in rural Kentucky would like to trade places with those of inner Detroit?"  Hands down, I'd wager my life savings that only a very, very few would.  My mother's brother left the hills after he returned home from the Korean War to move his family to Detroit.  He got a job at General Motors and retired from there years ago.  He made good money, but through the years, he kept moving further and further from Detroit because it was getting worse and worse.  My cousins still live up there and they are having a rough time.

Conversely, the poor people in rural Kentucky live in places where it is safe for their children to play outside, where many of them grow their own vegetables, fruit, and raise their own animals for food.  They are good hunters and can feed their family from the game they kill.  Most all of them have guns and most teach their children how to use them properly.  For many of the adults, their parents live next door or close by - and the grandparents help with childcare if the parents are lucky enough to have a job (most of the good-paying coal jobs are being destroyed now).  When the parents age, they are lucky enough to have children and grandchildren close by to help take care of them.  Houses are cheaper there too. 

Many of them have "family cemeteries" up on the hill on their property and I imagine their children play among their ancestor's graves like my mother and father used to do when they were small children.  It gives you a sense of continuity and roots. 

Appalachia has always been poor, for several reasons - it's splendid isolation and richness in natural resources, which were exploited by the coal and timber barons. 

Also, my ancestors came to America in the 1600's.  They settled in Virginia, moving to North Carolina and then pushing the frontier with Daniel Boone being some of the earliest settlers in Eastern Kentucky.  They were true frontiersmen, and my grandfather used to tell me that they were seeking isolated land - they fought off Indians to keep that land too.

The reasons were varied, my Pappaw said his great great.....great grandfather came here from England because they wouldn't let him grow a beard!  My maternal grandmother's great great....great grandfather moved up in the mountains because he was running from the law - he didn't believe in paying property taxes. 

LBJ brought his War on Poverty to the area, and it just got even poorer. 

Even with all that, I wouldn't want to live anywhere else.         

Wow, that is quite a vivid picture you drew there.  I live in Lancaster County, PA.  It is a rural county, although not a poor one by any means.  But what you say about rural life very much applies here as well.
"She only coughs when she lies."

Offline alicewonders

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 13,057
  • Live life-it's too short to butt heads w buttheads
Re: Are 97 of the nation's 100 poorest counties in red states?
« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2014, 10:22:11 PM »
Wow, that is quite a vivid picture you drew there.  I live in Lancaster County, PA.  It is a rural county, although not a poor one by any means.  But what you say about rural life very much applies here as well.

Yes, the quality of life in a rural setting here is part of why people are willing to have a lower standard of living.  Yes - a LOT of the young people flee as soon as they can - and many of them come back after a time.  My sister left for Europe shortly after high school to see the world and "get the hell away from here".  She lived there for a time and came back to the US, but she never moved back here. 

But me, I LONG for a more rural lifestyle!  I would move to one of those dark red counties in a nanosecond - correction - I WILL move to one of those counties as soon as my husband & I are able to completely retire and both of my parents have passed away.  When I was younger, I never thought I would want to do that but......I guess it's in my blood. 

And I've been to Lancaster County - BEAUTIFUL area! 
Don't tread on me.   8888madkitty

We told you Trump would win - bigly!

Offline jmyrlefuller

  • J. Myrle Fuller
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 13,634
Re: Are 97 of the nation's 100 poorest counties in red states?
« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2014, 09:30:54 AM »
"A deficit is what you've got when you haven't got as much as if you just had nothing. If we tried any of this, we'd end up in jail, but the government gets rid of its debts by nationalizing them. That's like the alcoholic who solved his problem by pouring the booze in all of his bottles into one big container. Himself." (Charlie Farquharson, edited for spelling)


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf