Author Topic: Phase-changing material could allow low-cost robots to switch between hard and soft states  (Read 268 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline EC

  • Shanghaied Editor
  • Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,524
  • Silence is Golden. Boredom is even better.
 In the movie "Terminator 2," the shape-shifting T-1000 robot morphs into a liquid state to squeeze through tight spaces or to repair itself when harmed. Now a phase-changing material built from wax and foam, and capable of switching between hard and soft states, could allow even low-cost robots to perform the same feat.

The material—developed by Anette Hosoi, a professor of mechanical engineering and applied mathematics at MIT, and her former graduate student Nadia Cheng, alongside researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization and Stony Brook University—could be used to build deformable surgical robots. The robots could move through the body to reach a particular point without damaging any of the organs or vessels along the way.

Robots built from the material, which is described in a new paper in the journal Macromolecular Materials and Engineering, could also be used in search-and-rescue operations to squeeze through rubble looking for survivors, Hosoi says.

Follow that octopus

Working with robotics company Boston Dynamics, based in Waltham, Mass., the researchers began developing the material as part of the Chemical Robots program of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The agency was interested in "squishy" robots capable of squeezing through tight spaces and then expanding again to move around a given area, Hosoi says—much as octopuses do.

But if a robot is going to perform meaningful tasks, it needs to be able to exert a reasonable amount of force on its surroundings, she says. "You can't just create a bowl of Jell-O, because if the Jell-O has to manipulate an object, it would simply deform without applying significant pressure to the thing it was trying to move."

What's more, controlling a very soft structure is extremely difficult: It is much harder to predict how the material will move, and what shapes it will form, than it is with a rigid robot.

Read more:

Totally fascinating. I know it's theoretical right now, but the implications are huge.
Before you bitch about the youth of today ... think about who raised them.

Avatar thanks to Oceander.

I've got a website now: Smoke and Ink

Online Oceander

  • Technical
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 40,992
  • SMOD 2016

That's all I can say:  wow!
I won't vote for Clinton, but I cannot vote for Trump.  How could I explain to my daughter why I supported a man who sees her as nothing more than a piece of meat, a piece of a$$ for him to grope for his own private pleasure.

"Trump supporter" - the very definition of an SFI

Offline Dexter

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3,211
Robots will eventually replace us all. Yeah, there will be some tech jobs for a while, but how long until the robots start building and maintaining themselves? How long until doctors and nurses are replaced by super intelligent robots that no human could ever compete with? We're all going to be jobless.
"I know one thing, that I know nothing."

Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo