Author Topic: Illinois Threatens To Fire Mom-Caregiver And Replace With SEIU-STATE Labor  (Read 348 times)

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Offline rangerrebew

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Illinois Threatens To Fire Mom-Caregiver And Replace With SEIU-STATE Labor

 
Thursday, June 26th, 2014 by Andrew Marcus
 


In Illinois, the state Department of Human Resources can “fire” family members as primary caregivers for disabled loved ones with SEIU approved replacement! From Washington Examiner:


Deborah Teixeira is in danger of literally being fired by the state of Illinois from her job as Juliet’s mother. The Peoria resident has been warned that if there are more infractions, the state will send a replacement into her home to take care of her daughter instead.

Teixeira is not alone. Across the state, mothers like her and other people taking care of their family members have been told via threatening official phone calls and letters that they could be replaced if they don’t shape up.

Illinois Review has more not the SEIU connection


Deborah said she was repeatedly harassed by state employees who accused her of gaming the system, and threatened to replace her with a state employee. And what of the union she is forced to pay dues to as a condition of receiving help from the state? When contacted, the Service Employees International Union, or SEIU, did nothing to stop the state.

Yup. You read that correctly. Deborah and other in home family caregivers in Illinois were forcibly unionized by the Democrat dominated government of Illinois on behalf of SEIU. Family members are forced to pay dues to SEIU, and where is SEIU when their “members” are being threatened by their “employer”? They’re silent.

http://www.progressivestoday.com/illinois-threatens-to-fire-mom-caregiver-and-replace-with-seiu-state-labor/
« Last Edit: June 26, 2014, 07:35:16 AM by rangerrebew »
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Offline Oceander

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Offline speekinout

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They have to clock in and out??? That's totally insane. Does that mean a mother can't help her child if she's "off the clock"?
Unbelievable!

Offline Oceander

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They have to clock in and out??? That's totally insane. Does that mean a mother can't help her child if she's "off the clock"?
Unbelievable!

I think the concept is to gauge how much financial support each person should get from the gov't by the number of hours that person spends actually providing support.  There is a certain naive sense to that:  someone who only has to spend 1 hour a day providing care to another really doesn't need as much financial support as someone else who has to spend 10 hours a day providing care.  My guess is that some gov't board sets a maximum limit based on the disabled child's condition, and the family member providing care gets compensated for actual hours of care provided, but not beyond that limit.  That being said, trying to keep track of that in practice is a mess, as this makes clear.  Illinois should find some better way to measure compensable need.

Viz. your question:  no, I don't think it means a mother cannot help her child when she's off the clock (n.b., that this only applies to a small group of people providing long-term care to a family-member with a disability; it doesn't apply to everyone who happens to have a kid).  What it really boils down to is that only some of that care is going to count toward the financial support the family gets from the state of Illinois.

Offline speekinout

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I think the concept is to gauge how much financial support each person should get from the gov't by the number of hours that person spends actually providing support.  There is a certain naive sense to that:  someone who only has to spend 1 hour a day providing care to another really doesn't need as much financial support as someone else who has to spend 10 hours a day providing care.  My guess is that some gov't board sets a maximum limit based on the disabled child's condition, and the family member providing care gets compensated for actual hours of care provided, but not beyond that limit.  That being said, trying to keep track of that in practice is a mess, as this makes clear.  Illinois should find some better way to measure compensable need.

I totally agree that IL needs to find a better way. I'm not sure I approve much of this whole benefit plan, but it would make a whole lot more sense to have the disabled person evaluated to see how much care time they should need, and then to just pay that. If the caregiver is hired, they probably won't work more than the paid hours. If the caregiver is a parent, they probably will, but who cares if the payment is fixed?

This is just another case where gov't has to control the private behavior of its minions. Is there no limit to how much we will tolerate of gov't control if it comes with a check???

Offline Fishrrman

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Such is life in one of the "new slavery" states, like Illinois...


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