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Offline flowers

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« on: June 23, 2014, 03:05:03 PM »


Offline Fishrrman

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« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2014, 08:55:08 PM »
[[ According to the Free Press, the average Detroit water bill is now $75 a month ]]

$75 a month?
For water?

No wonder folks ain't payin'.... !!

Offline musiclady

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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2014, 08:57:29 PM »
It's probably illegal to collect rainwater too.

EPA regs, or something like that....      :smokin:
Character still matters.  It always matters.

May 3, 2016 - the day the Republican party left ME.  I am now without a Party, and quite possibly without a country.  May God have mercy!

Offline speekinout

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« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2014, 09:04:32 PM »

Offline musiclady

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« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2014, 10:07:41 PM »
Character still matters.  It always matters.

May 3, 2016 - the day the Republican party left ME.  I am now without a Party, and quite possibly without a country.  May God have mercy!

Offline speekinout

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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2014, 10:26:16 PM »
Seriously??  Oy!    **nononono*

I thought I had read that it was illegal to collect rainwater in some places, but I didn't know about a tax on rain.

This country has gone stark raving mad!

It's called a rain tax, but it's really a tax on any part of your property that is impervious to rain - paved areas or buildings where the rain won't be absorbed into the earth are taxed. Sending runoff somewhere else is a no-no.

Maybe they can give a rebate for rain you collect in barrels? If you can prove it came from rain that fell on the driveway?  :shrug:

Offline 240B

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« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2014, 10:29:15 PM »
It's probably illegal to collect rainwater too.

EPA regs, or something like that....      :smokin:

Nobody worrys about what is "legal", in Detroit, especially the politicians.
You cannot "COEXIST" with people who want to kill you.

Online Oceander

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« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2014, 11:31:08 PM »
It's called a rain tax, but it's really a tax on any part of your property that is impervious to rain - paved areas or buildings where the rain won't be absorbed into the earth are taxed. Sending runoff somewhere else is a no-no.

Maybe they can give a rebate for rain you collect in barrels? If you can prove it came from rain that fell on the driveway?  :shrug:

What if the rain from one's driveway is drained into a dry well located on one's own property?  There is no net run-off and so the tax ought not apply.


As an aside, though, does the building code also require that there be a certain minimum amount of paved parking on every residential lot?  I ask because that seems a useful way to make it impossible for any property owner to avoid the tax by not building any impervious surfaces.

Offline speekinout

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« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2014, 12:13:54 AM »
What if the rain from one's driveway is drained into a dry well located on one's own property?  There is no net run-off and so the tax ought not apply.


As an aside, though, does the building code also require that there be a certain minimum amount of paved parking on every residential lot?  I ask because that seems a useful way to make it impossible for any property owner to avoid the tax by not building any impervious surfaces.

The tax applies to all impervious surfaces - roofs, driveways, parking areas, etc. Obviously, a residential lot will have a roof. And in many jurisdictions, you can't park on the street, nor can you park on grass, so you have to have some kind of driveway and garage or parking area.

It's a very liberal state (at least, the gov't is). The issue is about how to increase taxes and not about making sense.  :nono:

Online Oceander

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« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2014, 12:35:19 AM »
The tax applies to all impervious surfaces - roofs, driveways, parking areas, etc. Obviously, a residential lot will have a roof. And in many jurisdictions, you can't park on the street, nor can you park on grass, so you have to have some kind of driveway and garage or parking area.

It's a very liberal state (at least, the gov't is). The issue is about how to increase taxes and not about making sense.  :nono:

Does a gravel driveway count as impervious or not?

Offline Fishrrman

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« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2014, 10:01:57 AM »
Oceander wrote above:
[[ Does a gravel driveway count as impervious or not? ]]

A little off-topic, but a fearless prediction:
Before this administration is over, I expect the EPA to declare that WELL WATER also comes under its jurisdiction.

Rationale will be that since wells tap into "groundwater", drilling a well could impact the condition of underground aquifers, etc.

And with that, we will see requirements that before permission is granted to drill a new well, an EPA inspection or enviornmental impact report will be required -- and that numerous property owners building new homes will be denied such permits.

This is coming...

Online Oceander

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« Reply #11 on: June 24, 2014, 10:12:18 AM »
Oceander wrote above:
[[ Does a gravel driveway count as impervious or not? ]]

A little off-topic, but a fearless prediction:
Before this administration is over, I expect the EPA to declare that WELL WATER also comes under its jurisdiction.

Rationale will be that since wells tap into "groundwater", drilling a well could impact the condition of underground aquifers, etc.

And with that, we will see requirements that before permission is granted to drill a new well, an EPA inspection or enviornmental impact report will be required -- and that numerous property owners building new homes will be denied such permits.

This is coming...

possible, although I think the final nail in that argument would be that as the water in the aquifer is drawn down by wells, pollutants/contaminants are pulled into the aquifer, thus wells indirectly increase the pollution/contamination of the groundwater and can therefore be regulated.

It's not out of the realm of possibility.

Offline Chieftain

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« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2014, 10:40:37 AM »
Oceander wrote above:
[[ Does a gravel driveway count as impervious or not? ]]

A little off-topic, but a fearless prediction:
Before this administration is over, I expect the EPA to declare that WELL WATER also comes under its jurisdiction.

Rationale will be that since wells tap into "groundwater", drilling a well could impact the condition of underground aquifers, etc.

And with that, we will see requirements that before permission is granted to drill a new well, an EPA inspection or enviornmental impact report will be required -- and that numerous property owners building new homes will be denied such permits.

This is coming...

This is already here.  In some states you cannot collect rainwater without a state license because the state lays claim to every drop that falls on it.


Offline GourmetDan

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« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2014, 11:07:32 AM »

A little off-topic, but a fearless prediction:
Before this administration is over, I expect the EPA to declare that WELL WATER also comes under its jurisdiction.


A little further off-topic, the EPA is proposing to change the definition of 'navigable waters'  to include a new regulatory definition of 'tributaries'.

The government will soon own the puddles in your back yard.

Predictably, "Environmental groups, including Earthjustice and the National Wildlife Federation, were mostly effusive in their praise for the proposed rule."






"The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left." - Ecclesiastes 10:2

"The sole purpose of the Republican Party is to serve as an ineffective alternative to the Democrat Party." - GourmetDan

Offline musiclady

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« Reply #14 on: June 24, 2014, 11:26:45 AM »
This is already here.  In some states you cannot collect rainwater without a state license because the state lays claim to every drop that falls on it.

This is what I was referring to upthread.

Do you know what states they are (off the top of your kinda scary looking head), or should I actually do my own research and find out myself?    :dx1:
Character still matters.  It always matters.

May 3, 2016 - the day the Republican party left ME.  I am now without a Party, and quite possibly without a country.  May God have mercy!


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