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Online rangerrebew

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« on: June 03, 2014, 02:34:26 PM »
« Last Edit: June 03, 2014, 02:35:03 PM by rangerrebew »
"Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim tribute to patriotism who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness -- these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. . . . reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principles."
George Washington

"Only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become more corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters."
Benjamin Franklin

Online mountaineer

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« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2014, 03:36:30 PM »
Dr. Hal Scherz wrote in the WSJ:
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...  Scott Barbour, an orthopedic surgeon and a friend, trained at the Miami VA hospital. In an attempt to get more patients onto the operating-room schedule, he enlisted fellow residents to clean the operating rooms between cases and transport patients from their rooms into the surgical suites. Instead of offering praise for their industriousness, the chief of surgery reprimanded the doctors and put a stop to their actions. From his perspective, they were not solving a problem but were making federal workers look bad, and creating more work for others, like nurses, who had to take care of more post-op patients.

At the VA hospital in St. Louis, urologist Michael Packer, a former partner of mine, had difficulty getting charts from the medical records department. He and another resident hunted them down themselves. It was easier for department workers to say that they couldn't find a chart than to go through the trouble of looking. Without these records, patients could not receive care, which was an unacceptable situation to these doctors. Not long after they began doing this, they were warned to stand down.

There are thousands of other stories just like these. ...
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My late father had to visit the St. Louis VA hospital a few times back in the 1980s to have his war-related disability checked (he was seriously injured aboard ship in the South Pacific during WWII), and it always was an unpleasant experience. He was lucky to see a doctor who spoke English, for starters, but he was glad he only was being evaluated and not treated for his condition.
A day without sunshine is like, you know, night.


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