Author Topic: The 'Twisted World' of Elliot Rodger - Jack Cashill  (Read 192 times)

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Offline DCPatriot

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The 'Twisted World' of Elliot Rodger - Jack Cashill
« on: May 26, 2014, 09:01:14 AM »
May 26, 2014
The 'Twisted World' of Elliot Rodger
By Jack Cashill

http://americanthinker.com/2014/05/the_twisted_world_of_elliot_rodger.html


Were I to update my 2007 book, What’s the Matter with California, I would dedicate a chapter to Elliot Rodger, the sexually jealous young man who stabbed, shot, and ran over a score of victims, seven of them fatally, in his hate-filled Santa Barbara rampage.

Unlike many recent mass killers -- Adam Lanza (Sandy Hook), Jared Lee Loughner (Tucson), and James Holmes (Aurora) -- Rodger was sane enough to tell the world what ailed him, and this he did in a lucid, well written, 140-page memoir/ manifesto titled “My Twisted World.” better title might have been “Our Twisted World.”

Although talk of “white privilege” runs wild through Twitterdom, Rodger’s mother was an ethnic Chinese from Malaysia. His father Peter Rodger was an aspiring British film director who uprooted Elliot from his native England when the boy was five and moved the family to Southern California.

This move was disruptive enough, but the real disruption occurred two years later. Like so many Californians, Rodger’s mother and father divorced. Not surprisingly, it was California that initiated the nation’s first and most progressive no-fault divorce law. The state did so in September 1969, just weeks after the Manson murders.

Those murders should have caused state officials to think twice. The common thread among the otherwise attractive, well-educated “Manson girls” was that they came from broken homes. Once their own families fell apart, they proceeded to look for love in all the wrong places.

So too would Elliot Rodger. “I was absolutely shocked, outraged, and above all, overwhelmed,” wrote Rodger of his parents’ divorce. “This was a huge life-changing event.” Rodgers does not blame his parents or their divorce for his subsequent failures, but he could have.

Before the divorce, Rodger “thought a man and a woman had to be married before living together in such a manner,” but when his father promptly found a new girlfriend, Elliot “was completely taken aback.” Through his father’s adventures, he began to see sex as a commodity, something one purchased through money, good looks, and “cool,” an intangible that eluded Rodger as much as it obsessed him.

One Twitter post in defense of the parents sheds unwitting light on the world Rodger inhabited. “Elliot Rodger's parents gave & gave & gave,” reads the tweet.“Money. Housing. Resources. Therapy. Life Coaches. They got the police involved. Nothing happened.”

Here is what their parents did not give their son: a home, a neighborhood, a community, a church, a faith, a God, their time, their attention. For the fifteen miserable years of his life post-divorce, Rodger shuttled between the constantly shifting homes of his two financially unstable parents and their significant others.

Often alone and friendless, Rodger retreated into the ersatz life of the video gamer. The one game in particular that attracted him was World of Warcraft, a world into which he would descend for as many as fourteen hours a day.

“I became very addicted to the game and my character in it. It was all I cared about,” wrote Rodger. There he would fight monsters and complete quests only to emerge at the end of day as the little, unloved loner he was at the day’s beginning.

As Rodger reached puberty, he found a new outlet, masturbation. He would masturbate regularly “looking at pictures of girls online while . . . fantasizing about doing sexual things with them.” Given the experience of his parents and so many of their friends, he had a hard time putting sex into any other kind of context.

Height obsessed Rodger. He saw it as an essential asset in his pursuit of sex. When I watched his video rant before Google pulled it, I wondered how a good-looking kid in a BMW could be so singularly unsuccessful in attracting women. I speculated that he must be small. That he was and had always been. “I felt very small, weak, and above all, worthless,” he wrote and wrote again in one variant or another. More than once, he described himself as an “unworthy little mouse.”

The kind of women that Rodger liked did not like mice. “All of the hot, beautiful girls walked around with obnoxious, tough jock-type men who partied all the time and acted crazy,” Rodger observed. “Women are sexually attracted to the wrong type of man. This is a major flaw in the very foundation of humanity.”

Whether or not this is a flaw in humanity, the phenomenon Rodger described is real. As Dr. Seth Meyers and Katie Gilbert argue in a recent Psychology Today article, “The literature has widely established that women prefer tall men to short men.”

Meyers and Gilbert cite a University of British Columbia study that goes a step further in its claim that women do, in fact, prefer the mythic “bad boy” type. “Women just don’t believe short men can be bad boys,” write the authors.“It’s as if the ability to win a physical fight -- to overpower another man -- is part and parcel of who the bad boy is.”

Several of the feminists who have written about this incident insist on seeing women only as the victims of what Jessica Valenti in the Guardian calls “our cultural sickness -- a sickness that refuses to see misogyny as anything other than inevitable.”

Valenti and others on the left fail to see, however, that this sickness set in when they and their ideological allies began to dismantle protective institutions of lasting value like family, community, nation, faith, and married love.

This was a sickness that infected men and women equally. A generation or so ago a woman might have looked for a man who was kind, loving, pious, generous, faithful, hard working. The women in Rodger’s circle, as he saw it, looked for men who were hot, hunky and/or rich, none of which he was.

Yes, there is a sickness afoot in the land, but feminists have no more hope of curing it with sexual harassment laws or enforced sensitivity training than Rodger did with his “day of retribution.”
"It aint what you don't know that kills you.  It's what you know that aint so!" ...Theodore Sturgeon

"If you want to change the world, go home and love your family".    ...Mother Teresa

Offline jmyrlefuller

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Re: The 'Twisted World' of Elliot Rodger - Jack Cashill
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2014, 09:28:53 AM »
Wow. I think Cashill has hit a lot of very salient and important points here.

Perhaps these things are exactly why he ended up doing what he did instead of, for instance, ending up like me.
STILL a proud supporter of the Free Conservative Resistance (no affiliation with the left-wing "Resistance")

"Just because people in positions of authority are stupid, it doesn’t mean you have to go along with it." —Arlo Guthrie

Offline DCPatriot

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Re: The 'Twisted World' of Elliot Rodger - Jack Cashill
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2014, 09:54:13 AM »
Wow. I think Cashill has hit a lot of very salient and important points here.

Perhaps these things are exactly why he ended up doing what he did instead of, for instance, ending up like me.

Hang in there, buddy!    :beer:
"It aint what you don't know that kills you.  It's what you know that aint so!" ...Theodore Sturgeon

"If you want to change the world, go home and love your family".    ...Mother Teresa

Offline Luis Gonzalez

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Re: The 'Twisted World' of Elliot Rodger - Jack Cashill
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2014, 10:55:58 AM »
Quote
A generation or so ago a woman might have looked for a man who was kind, loving, pious, generous, faithful, hard working. The women in Rodger’s circle, as he saw it, looked for men who were hot, hunky and/or rich, none of which he was.

What an absurd proposition. "Women" haven't changed in a generation. In fact, the author contradicts himself in the second sentence.

The first sentence is a unfounded generalization which would have us believe that women no longer look for a man to have a long-term relationship based positive personality traits and strong moral values. That's simply not true, and probably somewhat insulting to women. The second sentence points out that the first sentence only applies to the women that Rodger's was attracted to, and those did NOT include the sort of women that (to use the author's unfounded generalization) a generation ago, men would have wanted to have a relationship with women based on whether they were kind, hard-working, pious, blah, blah, blah.
     
Are there shallow, slutty, superficial women out there?

Yes there are, and there are the men who love shallow, slutty women, and men who are the perfect counterpoint to shallow, slutty women.

Rodgers was a sad, pathetic loser who conflated internet fantasy with reality, porn and hack 'en and slash 'en games, and lost sight of reality.

It helps no one when one side uses the tragedy to point fingers at their favorite boogeyman.

Liberals blame guns, conservatives blame feminism.

Blame Rodgers and Rodgers alone, whose excuse was nothing more than an excuse and his violent rage nothing more than the violent rage of a loser.

His parents got a divorce and "hot girls" didn't like him?

Boo fu@%#ng Hoo, cry me a damned river... welcome to that exclusive club called EVERYBODY.

The rest of the world is not out there killing people because of it. In fact, I bet that some of the people he killed had lived through a parental divorce and had been rejected by someone at one time or another in their life, yet they managed not to go on self-serving, "pity me" killing rampages.

Insofar as feminism having destroyed the fabric of society, here's what Alexis de Toqueville had to say about the subject 176 years ago:

Quote
“There are people in Europe who, confounding together the different characteristics of the sexes, would make man and woman into beings not only equal but alike. They would give to both the same functions, impose on both the same duties, and grant to both the same rights; they would mix them in all things–their occupations, their pleasures, their business. It may readily be conceived that by thus attempting to make one sex equal to the other, both are degraded, and from so preposterous a medley of the works of nature nothing could ever result but weak men and disorderly women.” - from Democracy in America

« Last Edit: May 26, 2014, 10:58:42 AM by Luis Gonzalez »
“[Euthanasia] is what any State medical service has sooner or later got to face. If you are going to be kept alive in institutions run by and paid for by the State, you must accept the State’s right to economize when necessary …” The Ministry of Fear by Graham Green (New York: Penguin Books [1943] 2005, p. 165).


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