Author Topic: Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right  (Read 377 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mystery-ak

  • Owner
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 252,057
Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right
« on: May 19, 2014, 09:15:53 AM »
http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/Election-Rightward-Pull/2014/05/19/id/572019/

 Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right

Monday, 19 May 2014 07:01 AM

 


Tuesday's primary elections will give establishment Republicans another chance to defeat tea party-backed candidates, but some political activists are asking if it makes much difference.

They see tea partyers losing individual races but winning the larger ideological war by tugging the Republican Party rightward.

Several tea party-endorsed candidates are struggling in Tuesday's Republican congressional primaries in Georgia, Kentucky and Idaho. In each state, however, the "establishment" Republican candidates have emphasized their conservative credentials, which narrows the party's philosophical differences.

Brent Bozell, a sharp critic of Republican moderation, said: "With virtually no exception, everyone is running as a conservative. No one is running as a moderate, no one is running as an anti-tea-partyer."

Many Democrats agree. Looking at recent primaries and those slated for Tuesday, they say the GOP candidates who are trying to give Republicans control of the Senate will prove too far right for centrist voters in November.

Republicans need to gain six Senate seats to control the chamber. Protecting Kentucky and Georgia seats against well-funded Democrats, both women, is crucial to their hopes.

Six states hold primaries Tuesday. Georgia, Kentucky and Oregon have closely watched Republican contests for Senate. Pennsylvania and Arkansas have feisty gubernatorial primaries.

In Idaho, tea party-backed lawyer Bryan Smith is trying to oust Republican Rep. Mike Simpson, who's seeking a ninth House term.

In Kentucky, tea partyers would love to knock off Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, a 30-year senator they see as too accommodating to Democrats. But challenger Matt Bevin has struggled under a barrage of attacks from McConnell and his allies.

McConnell, caught off guard by the tea party movement in 2010, has scrambled to win support from conservatives who dislike compromise. He quickly allied himself with Sen. Rand Paul, who defeated McConnell's hand-picked candidate in the 2010 primary.

And in February, McConnell voted against raising the debt ceiling, a never-pleasant vote that past party leaders often swallowed to avert a government default.

In Georgia, the Republican primary to succeed retiring Sen. Saxby Chambliss drew a crowded field, including three U.S. House members. All are battling for the top two spots, with a July 22 runoff virtually certain.

Polls suggest Reps. Paul Broun and Phil Gingrey, who espouse tea party principles, may have faded in recent weeks. Georgia's former Secretary of State Karen Handel won endorsements from Sarah Palin and the Tea Party Express.

Rep. Jack Kingston and businessman David Perdue have walked a careful line: showing more openness to establishment support while still catering to hard-core conservatives who dominate Republican primaries. When the U.S. Chamber of Commerce endorsed Kingston, Broun called him "the king of pork."

That tag might have fit a few years ago. Kingston, a longtime Appropriations Committee member, has proudly steered millions of federal dollars to his district.

But tea party-driven attacks on federal spending have sent Republicans scurrying to tighter-fisted ground. Kingston raised eyebrows in January when he voted against an appropriations bill after working hard to insert funding for Savannah's port.

In a sign of the narrowing differences between tea party activists and traditional Republican groups, Kingston was endorsed by Bozell as well as the Chamber of Commerce.

And the chamber backed Kingston even though he has opposed two of its priorities: raising the debt ceiling, and overhauling U.S. immigration policies to allow legal status for millions of people living here illegally.

"I don't agree with folks in my family on every single issue, but I love them," said Chamber of Commerce political director Rob Engstrom.

In Oregon, Republicans hope to knock off first-term Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley in November. Seeking the GOP nomination Tuesday are pediatric neurosurgeon Monica Wehby and state Rep. Jason Conger.

Arkansas' primary holds drama for several state offices, but the U.S. Senate showdown will come this fall. Two-term Democratic Sen. Mark Pryor and first-term GOP Rep. Tom Cotton will claim their parties' nominations Tuesday.

Cotton cleared the Republican field partly by steering solidly right on key issues. He differed with his fellow Arkansas Republicans, for instance, by voting against a major farm bill, which conservatives found too costly.

Some conservatives and liberals alike reject the notion that the Republican establishment is taming the tea party movement this spring. They point to Thom Tillis, who won the Senate nomination in North Carolina by defeating leaders of the tea party and the Christian Right.

Democrats say Tillis, speaker of the North Carolina House, is no moderate. He led the way for cuts in taxes, education spending and unemployment benefits. He boasts of rejecting federal funds to expand Medicaid.

"He is as in synch with the tea party as they can get," said state Democratic spokesman Ben Ray.

Conservative activists say much the same thing, albeit with pride.

Matt Kibbe, who has feuded with McConnell as political chief of FreedomWorks, said the self-described liberty movement is winning the larger battles within the GOP.

"We've already changed the narrative, and the Republican Party is running on the principle of limited government," Kibbe said. "Now we have to figure out what to do with a seat at the table."

Support the USO

Offline Bigun

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 21,346
  • The income tax: Root of all evil!
    • The FairTax Plan
Re: Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2014, 09:36:58 AM »
And tugging the GOP to the right is EXACTLY what they set out to do in the first place!

Offline MACVSOG68

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 9,807
Re: Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2014, 09:48:06 AM »
And tugging the GOP to the right is EXACTLY what they set out to do in the first place!

Their strength was and continues to be in the area of fiscal restraint.  If they want to continue influencing the Party, they have to take care with the candidates they support and the slogans they stand on.
It's the Supreme Court nominations!

Offline Luis Gonzalez

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 7,532
    • Boiling Frogs
Re: Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2014, 09:49:46 AM »
Their strength was and continues to be in the area of fiscal restraint.  If they want to continue influencing the Party, they have to take care with the candidates they support and the slogans they stand on.

Hear, hear!
“[Euthanasia] is what any State medical service has sooner or later got to face. If you are going to be kept alive in institutions run by and paid for by the State, you must accept the State’s right to economize when necessary …” The Ministry of Fear by Graham Green (New York: Penguin Books [1943] 2005, p. 165).

Offline jmyrlefuller

  • J. Myrle Fuller
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 12,615
  • There's no one out there quite like me.
    • Fullervision
Re: Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2014, 10:14:02 AM »
I don't think they're thoroughly losing. They're still doing very well in the House races. It's the Senate that is causing the problems.

Kentucky is a travesty. No question about it. It's in the same category as South Carolina and the Boehner primary: dishonest politics is winning the day over honest debates over policy. How Mitch McConnell, who openly pushed for the bailout, has any ground to criticize Matt Bevin for doing so-- and to use that as his primary line of attack-- it is simply hypocritical. At least Bevin had a rationale.

Georgia on the other hand I can live with. The Broun campaign in particular, and to a lesser extent Gingrey, had a very high risk of becoming something along the lines of Todd Akin-- a mouthy showboat who puts the entire party at risk.
"Just because people in positions of authority are stupid, it doesn’t mean you have to go along with it." —Arlo Guthrie

"In the excitement of great popular elections, deciding the policy of the country, and its vast patronage, frauds will be committed, if a chance is given for them." —Richard Henry Dana, Jr.

Avatar by FatCow. Used under free license

Offline Luis Gonzalez

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 7,532
    • Boiling Frogs
Re: Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2014, 10:17:37 AM »
I don't think they're thoroughly losing. They're still doing very well in the House races. It's the Senate that is causing the problems.

Kentucky is a travesty. No question about it. It's in the same category as South Carolina and the Boehner primary: dishonest politics is winning the day over honest debates over policy. How Mitch McConnell, who openly pushed for the bailout, has any ground to criticize Matt Bevin for doing so-- and to use that as his primary line of attack-- it is simply hypocritical. At least Bevin had a rationale.

Georgia on the other hand I can live with. The Broun campaign in particular, and to a lesser extent Gingrey, had a very high risk of becoming something along the lines of Todd Akin-- a mouthy showboat who puts the entire party at risk.

How did the Boehner primary constitute dishonest politics?
« Last Edit: May 19, 2014, 10:18:01 AM by Luis Gonzalez »
“[Euthanasia] is what any State medical service has sooner or later got to face. If you are going to be kept alive in institutions run by and paid for by the State, you must accept the State’s right to economize when necessary …” The Ministry of Fear by Graham Green (New York: Penguin Books [1943] 2005, p. 165).

Offline MACVSOG68

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 9,807
Re: Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2014, 10:31:52 AM »
How did the Boehner primary constitute dishonest politics?

Dishonest politics is what everyone you don't like engages in...
It's the Supreme Court nominations!

Offline Luis Gonzalez

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 7,532
    • Boiling Frogs
Re: Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2014, 10:39:31 AM »
Dishonest politics is what everyone you don't like engages in...

 :beer:
“[Euthanasia] is what any State medical service has sooner or later got to face. If you are going to be kept alive in institutions run by and paid for by the State, you must accept the State’s right to economize when necessary …” The Ministry of Fear by Graham Green (New York: Penguin Books [1943] 2005, p. 165).

Offline jmyrlefuller

  • J. Myrle Fuller
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 12,615
  • There's no one out there quite like me.
    • Fullervision
Re: Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right
« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2014, 11:15:44 AM »
How did the Boehner primary constitute dishonest politics?
Well, both of his last two significant challengers suddenly lost their jobs, in Winteregg's case immediately after he started to get name recognition. That, of course, is now in the past.
"Just because people in positions of authority are stupid, it doesn’t mean you have to go along with it." —Arlo Guthrie

"In the excitement of great popular elections, deciding the policy of the country, and its vast patronage, frauds will be committed, if a chance is given for them." —Richard Henry Dana, Jr.

Avatar by FatCow. Used under free license

Offline Luis Gonzalez

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 7,532
    • Boiling Frogs
Re: Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2014, 11:38:40 AM »
Well, both of his last two significant challengers suddenly lost their jobs, in Winteregg's case immediately after he started to get name recognition. That, of course, is now in the past.


In Winteregg's case, it was immediately after he aired an ad that his employer found unpalatable and not something that they wanted associated with their school. His recognition came from a somewhat vulgar ad.

Sometimes, things are exactly as they appear to be, and not everything is a conspiracy.

Correlation isn't causation.

“[Euthanasia] is what any State medical service has sooner or later got to face. If you are going to be kept alive in institutions run by and paid for by the State, you must accept the State’s right to economize when necessary …” The Ministry of Fear by Graham Green (New York: Penguin Books [1943] 2005, p. 165).

Offline MACVSOG68

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 9,807
Re: Tea Party Losing but Still Tugging GOP to Right
« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2014, 01:27:14 PM »
In Winteregg's case, it was immediately after he aired an ad that his employer found unpalatable and not something that they wanted associated with their school. His recognition came from a somewhat vulgar ad.

Sometimes, things are exactly as they appear to be, and not everything is a conspiracy.

Correlation isn't causation.



Bad Dog!!!   000hehehehe
It's the Supreme Court nominations!


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf