Author Topic: Popes John XXIII and John Paul II Become Saints in Historic Dual Canonization  (Read 754 times)

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http://www.newsmax.com/Headline/popes-dual-canonization-francis/2014/04/27/id/567923/



 Popes John XXIII and John Paul II Become Saints in Historic Dual Canonization

Sunday, 27 Apr 2014 06:42 AM

 
Pope Francis proclaimed his predecessors John XXIII and John Paul II saints in front of more than half a million pilgrims in the Vatican on Sunday, hailing both as courageous men who withstood the tragedies of the 20th century.

Cheers and applause rang out across St Peter's Square after the historic double papal canonization as many in the crowd fixed their gaze on huge tapestries of the two popes on the facade of the basilica behind Francis.

"We declare and define Blessed John XXIII and John Paul II to be saints and we enroll them among the saints, decreeing that they are to be venerated as such by the whole Church," Francis said in his formal proclamation in Latin.

Relics of each man - a container of blood from John Paul II and skin from John XXIII - were placed near the altar.

The crowd was so large it stretched back along Via della Conciliazione, the broad, half-kilometer boulevard that starts at the Tiber River.

The Mass was also attended by former Pope Benedict, who last year became the first pontiff in six centuries to step down. Benedict walked with a cane and was dressed in white.

His attendance gave the ceremony a somewhat surreal atmosphere created by the presence of reigning pope, a retired pope and two dead popes buried in the basilica. Francis went over to greet Benedict twice during the service.

"These were two men of courage ... and they bore witness before the Church and the world to God's goodness and mercy," Francis said in his address.

"They lived through the tragic events of that (the 20th) century, but they were not overwhelmed by them. For them, God was more powerful; faith was more powerful," he added.

John XXIII, who reigned from 1958 to 1963 and called the modernizing Second Vatican Council, lived through both world wars.

John Paul II, the Pole who reigned for nearly 27 years witnessed the devastation of his homeland in World War Two and is credited by many with helping end the Cold War and bring down communism.

The fact that the two being canonized are widely seen as representing contrasting faces of the Church has added to the significance of an event that Francis hopes will draw the world's 1.2 billion Catholics closer together.

The Vatican said more than 500,000 people filled the basilica area while another 300,000 watched the event on large television screens throughout Rome.

The overwhelming majority in the crowd were Poles who had traveled from their home country and immigrant communities as far afield as Chicago and Sydney to watch their most famous native son become a saint.

Hundreds of red and white Polish flags filled the square and the streets surrounding the Vatican, which were strewn with sleeping bags, backpacks and folding chairs.

"For years Pope John Paul II took the Church to the ends of the earth and today the ends of the earth have come back here," said Father Tom Rosica, head of Canada's Salt and Light Catholic television network.

Families and other pilgrims had waited for more than 12 hours along the main street leading to the Vatican before police opened up the square at 5:30 a.m.

Some people said they had managed to sleep on their feet because the crowd was so thick.

About 850 cardinals and bishops celebrated the Mass with the pope and 700 priests were on hand to distribute communion to the huge crowd.

Francis' own huge popularity has added extra appeal to the unprecedented ceremony to raise two former leaders of the church to sainthood on the same day. But while both were widely revered, there has also been criticism that John Paul II, who only died nine years ago, has been canonized too quickly.

Groups representing victims of sexual abuse by Catholic priests also say he did not do enough to root out a scandal that emerged towards the end of his pontificate and which has hung over the church ever since.

The controversy did nothing to put off the rivers of Catholic faithful.

"I think that they were two great people, each of them had their own particular character, so they deserve what is happening," said Leonardo Ruino, who came from Argentina.

About 10,000 police and security personnel and special paramedic teams were deployed and large areas of Rome were closed to traffic.

John, an Italian often known as the "Good Pope" because of his friendly, open personality, died before the Second Vatican Council ended its work in 1965 but his initiative set off one of the greatest upheavals in Church teaching in modern times.

The Council ended the use of Latin at Mass, brought in the use of modern music and opened the way for challenges to Vatican authority, which alienated some traditionalists.

John Paul continued many of the reforms but tightened central control, condemned theological renegades and preached a stricter line on social issues such as sexual freedom.

A charismatic, dominant pope, he was criticized by some as a rigid conservative but the adoration he inspired was shown by the huge crowds whose chants of "santo subito!" (make him a saint at once!) at his funeral 2005 were answered with the fastest declaration of sainthood in modern history.

The election of the Argentinian-born Pope Francis has injected fresh enthusiasm into a Church beset by sexual and financial scandals during the papacy of his predecessor Benedict XVI.

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Online DCPatriot

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I remember camping overnight on the Washington Mall grounds on a blanket with my then fiance and her sister back in the late 70's to see Pope John II.

We had to roll up the blanket because eventually we were packed like sardines. 

Never imagined I was waiting for a Saint.

edit to add:  And they were Church of Christ members....not very fond of Catholics.  LOL!
« Last Edit: April 27, 2014, 10:16:21 AM by DCPatriot »
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Offline EC

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Wife is pleased even though she is no longer Catholic!  :laugh:

As a child in Italy, she said John XXIII was already referred to as a living Saint by most people. She does have one strop with him - she wanted to wear a pretty dress for her first communion. He'd made a call for simplicity, so she had to wear a very plain one!  :laugh:
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Wife is pleased even though she is no longer Catholic!  :laugh:

As a child in Italy, she said John XXIII was already referred to as a living Saint by most people. She does have one strop with him - she wanted to wear a pretty dress for her first communion. He'd made a call for simplicity, so she had to wear a very plain one!  :laugh:

Ah....Cardinal Roncolli, iirc.

I was an altar boy while Pope Pius XII was alive.  Always thought he was overlooked, but perhaps the WW had an effect on his biography.

Tribute my maternal grandmother, a Sicilian who wore a rosary around her neck for following Pope John XXIII.  We could tell he was 'special'.

Hoping that these canonizations aren't another example of Barack Obama receiving the Nobel Peace Prize a week after he was inaugurated.  Lowering the bar.....etc.
"It aint what you don't know that kills you.  It's what you know that aint so!" ...Theodore Sturgeon

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Offline Luis Gonzalez

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When everything became right in the world.


Online mystery-ak

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Ah....Cardinal Roncolli, iirc.

I was an altar boy while Pope Pius XII was alive.  Always thought he was overlooked, but perhaps the WW had an effect on his biography.

Tribute my maternal grandmother, a Sicilian who wore a rosary around her neck for following Pope John XXIII.  We could tell he was 'special'.

Hoping that these canonizations aren't another example of Barack Obama receiving the Nobel Peace Prize a week after he was inaugurated.  Lowering the bar.....etc.

From what I have read I don't know what they have done to deserve sainthood...at least from what I was taught about the Saints.

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Offline EC

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I was an altar boy while Pope Pius XII was alive.  Always thought he was overlooked, but perhaps the WW had an effect on his biography.

Tribute my maternal grandmother, a Sicilian who wore a rosary around her neck for following Pope John XXIII.  We could tell he was 'special'.

Hoping that these canonizations aren't another example of Barack Obama receiving the Nobel Peace Prize a week after he was inaugurated.  Lowering the bar.....etc.

I do think Pope Pius XII got a bit of the short end of the stick. What was he going to do, really? I know the Church in Italy actively, though covertly, encouraged Catholics to hide Jews and protect them. To give aid and comfort to the Partisans and the remnants of the Italian Army.

To answer the famous quote: "How many battalions does the Pope have?" - a lot. They just work in mysterious ways!  :whistle: Your maternal Grandmother would agree! My wife's definitely would!

John XXIII - definitely deserves it, if only for one thing. After the War, there were a lot of bastards about. A lot of women who were persecuted and killed for associating with the Germans. He decided to protect them, not just by issuing an order, but to the tune of millions of dollars to relocate them, make sure the kids got an education and a trip to the sea side every year for a week or so.

John Paul II - not as sure about the deservingness of this honor.
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Offline sinkspur

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From what I have read I don't know what they have done to deserve sainthood...at least from what I was taught about the Saints.

A saint is a person who does the One Thing for God.

John XXIII invented the concept "pastoral,"  that is, adapting Church teachings to modern practice.  His Council has changed the Church for the better and enabled it to be more effective.

John Paul II made it his mission to spread the Gospel to every part of the globe.  He did that well, and his personal style touched more people than any other human being who lived in the latter half of the 20th century-----maybe ever.

Both good men, even great men. 
Roy Moore's "spiritual warfare" is driving past a junior high without stopping.

Offline Luis Gonzalez

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From what I have read I don't know what they have done to deserve sainthood...at least from what I was taught about the Saints.

John Paul II was instrumental in defeating Soviet Communism.

"Without the Pope, no Solidarity. Without Solidarity, no Gorbachev. Without Gorbachev, no fall of Communism." - British scholar Timothy Garton Ash

I'd canonize him for just that.

« Last Edit: April 27, 2014, 02:06:07 PM by Luis Gonzalez »

Online mystery-ak

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A saint is a person who does the One Thing for God.

John XXIII invented the concept "pastoral,"  that is, adapting Church teachings to modern practice.  His Council has changed the Church for the better and enabled it to be more effective.

John Paul II made it his mission to spread the Gospel to every part of the globe.  He did that well, and his personal style touched more people than any other human being who lived in the latter half of the 20th century-----maybe ever.

Both good men, even great men.

I thought to become a Saint a miracle had to been accredited to you....or martyrdom, or serving your faith at some personal risk or visions of Mary etc the only thing worthy of Sainthood

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I thought to become a Saint a miracle had to been accredited to you....or martyrdom, or serving your faith at some personal risk or visions of Mary etc the only thing worthy of Sainthood

Far as I remember - 3 witnessed miracles at the minimum is the requirement to move into the canonization process.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2014, 02:23:53 PM by EC »
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While I think it's wonderful...for those of us alive while they walked...it still seems more like a Roman Catholic Hall of Fame, than a member of Sainthood.

Like Myst said...it's weird for those of us who grew up being taught miracles must happen and be witnessed, etc.,

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Offline sinkspur

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I thought to become a Saint a miracle had to been accredited to you....or martyrdom, or serving your faith at some personal risk or visions of Mary etc the only thing worthy of Sainthood

John Paul had two (he changed the requirement from three to two) and John XXIII had one, but Francis decided to elevated John XXIII to saint hood with just one miracle.

There is little doubt among the Catholic faithful that these two men are saints, except among some constantly-angry back-to-the-past retrograders.
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Offline Luis Gonzalez

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While I think it's wonderful...for those of us alive while they walked...it still seems more like a Roman Catholic Hall of Fame, than a member of Sainthood.

Like Myst said...it's weird for those of us who grew up being taught miracles must happen and be witnessed, etc.,

So, we canonize the '69 Mets?

Offline jmyrlefuller

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John XXIII was before my time. John Paul II was a big part of my childhood.

Although both my parents had left the Roman Catholic church long before I was born (I was raised a Methodist), we had Polish blood in the family, so John Paul II drew a lot of attention and respect. It's clear that he had at least some influence on Francis in regard to the evangelical side of his ministry, the reaching out to the masses... and on Benedict XVI, who saw in JPII a man who perhaps stayed too long.

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Do Catholics have "pre-emptive" canonizations?  I'm thinking Obama deserves it. :whistle:
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