Author Topic: Recognizing danger, GOP engages with Democrats in battle for women voters  (Read 196 times)

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Offline happyg

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By David Drucker

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=dc_AAje-4l0


As the Democratic Party implements its "War on Women" campaign against the Republicans in the hopes of mobilizing female voters and heading off a midterm elections defeat, the GOP is fighting back.

In doing so, Republicans on Capitol Hill and GOP candidates running in key congressional races are acknowledging the potency of the Democrats' 2014 strategy. The Republicans are belatedly conceding that simply trotting out GOP women in front of the cameras, in a bid to prove that a party that eagerly elects women to high office couldn't possibly be anti-women, has been ineffective in rebutting the line of attack.
   
 
The television ad launched this week by the presumptive Republican Senate nominee in Michigan, Terri Lynn Land, is the most blatant example of the GOP's admission of its vulnerable position with female voters, a key voting bloc that pulls the lever in greater percentages than men, who still generally favor conservatives. Land's ad suggests that it's the height of ridiculousness for her male opponent, Rep. Gary Peters, D-Mich., to paint her as waging a “war on women.”

Strategically, it's a smart move by Land, a former Michigan secretary of state, in her bid to become the first Republican elected to the Senate from the Wolverine State since 1996. But that she had to run this television spot at all is indicative of the Republican Party's predicament.

“Congressman Gary Peters, and his buddies, want you to believe I’m waging a war on women. Really? Think about that for a moment,” Land says, speaking directly to the camera as the ad opens. She closes the spot saying: “I’m Terri Lynn Land, and I approved this message because as a woman, I might know a little bit more about women than Gary Peters.”

In 2012, 53 percent of voters were female, and they voted for President Obama over Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney by a margin of 55 percent to 44 percent, a significant victory that included a whopping 67 percent to 31 percent margin among single women. Romney won married women 53 percent to 46 percent, and white women 56 percent to 42 percent.

Voter turnout is typically more Republican-friendly in midterm elections, which is likely to lessen the effect of the Democrats' gender-gap advantage. Indeed, polling has shown the GOP positioned to maintain and possibly increase its House majority, and possibly flip control of the Senate. But it was apparent from the aggressive manner in how congressional Republicans responded to the Democrats' push for “equal pay” legislation earlier this month that they are concerned about their ability to appeal to women in November.

More at link: http://washingtonexaminer.com/recognizing-danger-gop-engages-with-democrats-in-battle-for-women-voters/article/2547624
« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 09:24:06 PM by happyg »

Offline evadR²

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In 2012, 53 percent of voters were female, and they voted for President Obama over Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney by a margin of 55 percent to 44 percent, a significant victory that included a whopping 67 percent to 31 percent margin among single women. Romney won married women 53 percent to 46 percent, and white women 56 percent to 42 percent.

Every election the black female and the single female vote sends us down the toilet. It doesn't give the % for blacks but I'll wager it's well over 95%. Since both groups are a "what's in it for me" mentality, I don't see that changing.

The GOP should concentrate on increasing its percentages in the married female category.
November 6, 2012, a day in infamy...the death of a republic as we know it.

Offline olde north church

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In 2012, 53 percent of voters were female, and they voted for President Obama over Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney by a margin of 55 percent to 44 percent, a significant victory that included a whopping 67 percent to 31 percent margin among single women. Romney won married women 53 percent to 46 percent, and white women 56 percent to 42 percent.

Every election the black female and the single female vote sends us down the toilet. It doesn't give the % for blacks but I'll wager it's well over 95%. Since both groups are a "what's in it for me" mentality, I don't see that changing.

The GOP should concentrate on increasing its percentages in the married female category.

Point 2 is why I have "evolved" on the abortion issue.  I understand it's the "Broken Clock Theory" but sometimes it works.
Why?  Well, because I'm a bastard, that's why.

Offline evadR²

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In 2012, 53 percent of voters were female, and they voted for President Obama over Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney by a margin of 55 percent to 44 percent, a significant victory that included a whopping 67 percent to 31 percent margin among single women. Romney won married women 53 percent to 46 percent, and white women 56 percent to 42 percent.

Every election the black female and the single female vote sends us down the toilet. It doesn't give the % for blacks but I'll wager it's well over 95%. Since both groups are a "what's in it for me" mentality, I don't see that changing.

The GOP should concentrate on increasing its percentages in the married female category.

Point 2 is why I have "evolved" on the abortion issue.  I understand it's the "Broken Clock Theory" but sometimes it works.

I understand.
While I personally abhor abortion in 99.9% of all cases, I'm not going to lose an election over it.
It is not possible for me to find a candidate who passes the litmus test of agreeing with me on all issues.
There are no more Reagans.
November 6, 2012, a day in infamy...the death of a republic as we know it.


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