Author Topic: 2014: The Year Without Summer  (Read 388 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online mystery-ak

  • Owner
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 257,530
2014: The Year Without Summer
« on: April 22, 2014, 09:51:27 AM »

Support the USO

Online Oceander

  • Technical
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 47,442
  • Chief Dork
Re: 2014: The Year Without Summer
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2014, 02:25:07 PM »
Apparently the Farmer's Almanac disagrees, saying that NYC, at least, will have a hot muggy summer:  http://nypost.com/2014/04/14/stifling-heat-heavy-rains-to-hit-nyc-this-summer/

Online aligncare

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 19,720
Re: 2014: The Year Without Summer
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2014, 03:48:59 PM »
I despise greenies. By viewing humans as something apart from nature those self-righteous alarmists are completely out of touch with the natural world.
NeverTrump wants to deny you YOUR voice, YOUR presidential choice.

Online jmyrlefuller

  • Krampus
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 13,308
  • Angry goat-like creature
Re: 2014: The Year Without Summer
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2014, 06:35:31 PM »
This is not going to be another 1816, not by a long shot. For one, temperatures were already fairly cold prior to the summer of 1815; 2012 and 2013, on the other hand, were significantly warmer than average. Two, the volcano that triggered the short-term cooling, Tambora, was one of the most massive and extensive in recorded history, and none of the volcanoes in the past 20 years have even come close to it. (Pinatubo, which caused a noticeably cooler 1992, did come somewhat close.)

Offline Chieftain

  • AMF, YOYO
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 9,633
  • Your what hurts??
Re: 2014: The Year Without Summer
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2014, 06:56:17 PM »
Tambora was one of the most powerful volcanic eruptions in recorded history.  It exploded with a force of about 800 Megatons, and put about 38 cubic miles of dust, ash and tephra into the atmosphere, which is what caused the colder temperatures in the summer of 1815. 

While there can always be another large eruption like Tambora, it is not likely to happen any time soon, and nobody has ever been able to accurately predict a volcanic eruption.


Offline EC

  • Shanghaied Editor
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 23,836
  • Cats rule. Dogs drool.
Re: 2014: The Year Without Summer
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2014, 11:55:25 PM »
Tambora was one of the most powerful volcanic eruptions in recorded history.  It exploded with a force of about 800 Megatons, and put about 38 cubic miles of dust, ash and tephra into the atmosphere, which is what caused the colder temperatures in the summer of 1815. 

While there can always be another large eruption like Tambora, it is not likely to happen any time soon, and nobody has ever been able to accurately predict a volcanic eruption.

Not to disagree - but isn't Yellowstone getting ready to blow? That would make Tambora look like a firecracker.
The universe doesn't hate you. Unless your name is Tsutomu Yamaguchi

Avatar courtesy of Oceander

I've got a website now: Smoke and Ink

Offline Chieftain

  • AMF, YOYO
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 9,633
  • Your what hurts??
Re: 2014: The Year Without Summer
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2014, 08:10:57 AM »
Not to disagree - but isn't Yellowstone getting ready to blow? That would make Tambora look like a firecracker.

Yellowstone is indeed an active volcanic area that has seen at least three major eruptions over the millennia but nothing very recently.  USGS monitors Yellowstone very carefully, but there is no sign of an imminent eruption there at this time.  But yes, if it did blow it would probably rival any other eruption....


Offline EC

  • Shanghaied Editor
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 23,836
  • Cats rule. Dogs drool.
Re: 2014: The Year Without Summer
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2014, 09:17:56 AM »
Tambora was, what, 4 miles across? I know it was bigger than Krakatoa and much bigger than Santorini/Thera.

Yellowstone is 60 miles across. It is going to make one hell of a boom when it blows - probably big enough to shift the entire planets axis slightly.
The universe doesn't hate you. Unless your name is Tsutomu Yamaguchi

Avatar courtesy of Oceander

I've got a website now: Smoke and Ink

Offline WAYNE

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 533
Re: 2014: The Year Without Summer
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2014, 09:22:53 AM »
  The bison are leaving Yellowstone . That is enough of a warning for me not to visit there again..

Offline Fishrrman

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 12,390
Re: 2014: The Year Without Summer
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2014, 11:02:03 PM »
Just one week away from May here in southwest Connecticut, and the next couple of nights look to be in the mid-low 30's.

Only the slightest evidence of leaves on the trees yet...

Offline Chieftain

  • AMF, YOYO
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 9,633
  • Your what hurts??
Re: 2014: The Year Without Summer
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2014, 11:29:23 PM »
Tambora was, what, 4 miles across? I know it was bigger than Krakatoa and much bigger than Santorini/Thera.

Yellowstone is 60 miles across. It is going to make one hell of a boom when it blows - probably big enough to shift the entire planets axis slightly.

Yellowstone has done so before, at least twice, perhaps three times in the last few million years.  There are at least three calderas at Yellowstone.  Tambora was about three times the size of Krakatoa, so 4 miles across is a good estimate for Tambora.

But there is plenty of evidence that at one time Java and Sumatra were one big island, and an enormous subduction quake/eruption, about where the 1883 Krakatoa was, sundered it into two separate land masses.  There is a nasty subduction zone and permanent hot spot there that will always be prone to extreme events, mainly from the rapid incursion of seawater into contact with magma....massive steam explosions.

Just for conversational purposes, if you want a catastrophic event that would outdo anything a mere volcano could offer, think about an ocean strike asteroid.  The earth's crust is thinnest at the bottom of the sea and a large enough mass traveling at sufficient speed could plow the water aside down to the bottom and open a hole right into the mantle.  We're talking kinetic energy 101, where mass increases with the speed of the object.  Get a 100 pound mass of metal up to a significant percentage of the speed of light and you quickly begin to get relativistic effects, where that mass hits with thousands of times more force.

The resulting tsunamis would be the least of our worries....until the hole in the crust cooled enough to heal, then cooled even more to stop boiling the ocean above it, it would pump live steam directly into the stratosphere where it would quickly condense and cover the entire planet with clouds.  The hot spot would heat the water above it sufficiently to form a permanent hurricane over it that would spin off massive storms across the planet.  It would take decades for the water to snow out of the atmosphere and decades more for even the equator to become habitable...

The volcanoes we know about....the asteroids....not so much......



Offline EC

  • Shanghaied Editor
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 23,836
  • Cats rule. Dogs drool.
Re: 2014: The Year Without Summer
« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2014, 12:01:10 AM »
Do you know what happened to the Skywatch program? I've not seen a mention of it in years now, but remember when it was rolled out with quite a bit of fanfare back in the late 60s. It was a network of telescopes, both government and hobbyist that were dedicated to spotting and tracking asteroids that might be incoming. 
The universe doesn't hate you. Unless your name is Tsutomu Yamaguchi

Avatar courtesy of Oceander

I've got a website now: Smoke and Ink


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf