Author Topic: Police say accused California serial killers wore GPS trackers while committing crimes  (Read 172 times)

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Offline flowers

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The two paroled sex offenders who authorities in Southern California believe raped and killed four women allegedly wore GPS trackers while committing their crimes, and investigators believe there may be more victims.

Anaheim police Chief Raul Quezada said Monday that Franc Cano, 27, and Steven Dean Gordon, 45, were wearing ankle tracking bracelets when the women were assaulted and killed last fall and earlier this year. The chief added that data from the devices "was one of the investigative tools we used to put the case together." Authorities at the news conference did not explain how Cano and Gordon allegedly managed to carry out the killings while under supervision.

Anaheim police Lt. Bob Dunn earlier said the two were complying with a requirement to check in monthly with authorities and police had no reason to watch them more closely and hadn't received any such request from other agencies.

The Orange County distract attorney's office said Cano and Gordon, who were arrested Friday, were each charged with four felony counts of special circumstances murder and four felony counts of rape. If convicted, the men could face a minimum sentence of life without parole or the death penalty. They were being held without bail and expected to be arraigned Tuesday.

Quezada said the key to the case was the discovery of 21-year-old Jarrae Nykkole Estepp's naked body on the conveyer belt at an Anaheim trash-sorting plant March 14. Estepp is the only one of the suspected victims whose body has been found. Quezada said authorities were confident that there was at least a fifth victim and perhaps more.

The department has contacted other places with missing-persons cases across the country, Dunn said earlier.

The string of disappearances began in October after Kianna Jackson, 20, of Las Vegas, arrived in Santa Ana for a court hearing on four misdemeanor charges of prostitution and loitering to commit prostitution. Her mother said she stopped responding to her text messages soon after she arrived in Santa Ana.

Josephine Monique Vargas, 34, was last seen Oct. 24 after leaving a family birthday party to go to a store. The Los Angeles Times quoted Vargas's mother as saying that her daughter had a rough past that at times involved drug use and prostitution, but had been trying to better her life.

Martha Anaya, 28, asked her boyfriend to pick up their 5-year-old daughter so she could work on Nov. 12, then stopped responding to his messages later that night. Police said she also had a history of prostitution.

The Associated Press reported that in the weeks prior to her death, Estepp had become a regular on a strip of Beach Boulevard in Anaheim long known for prostitution.

Police at first didn't link the disappearances of the four women to the suspects, considering them missing persons rather than murder victims.

Offline truth_seeker

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"We the People" pay and delegate to government employees, the design and operation of systems of law and punishments, such that individuals don't have to worry about their personal safety.

Legislators, judges (even ignorant juries), and lawyers set the terms of keeping these horrific organisms in prison, or not.

They fail us over and over. And we seem to have little or no recourse. Our legislators are overruled by judges, if they try to solve problems with laws. 

Offline massadvj

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Public employment is pretty much make-work, so this doesn't surprise me at all.  The fact that government is so inefficient is both a blessing and a curse.
"She only coughs when she lies."

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