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Offline Rapunzel

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STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« on: March 15, 2014, 06:57:46 PM »
http://patriotsbillboard.org/stolen-f-35-secrets-show-up-in-chinas-stealth-fighter/


STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
Posted on March 13, 2014 by PatriotsBillboard   

There Have Been Many American Defense Secrets Sold To Chinese Officials That Have Been Seen In Several Of Their Newest Weapons That Match Ours Exactly. The F-35 Secrets Now Showing Up in China’s Stealth Fighter, Were Stolen in 2007. Obama Has Recently Even Encouraged Our Defense Tech Be Shared With China……….Photo-comparison-of-the-U.S.-F-35-left-and-Chinese-J-20.-China-obtained-F-35-design-data-in-2007-through-cyberespionage.-Chinese-Internet

Photo comparison of the U.S. F-35 left and Chinese J-20. / Chinese website

Bill Gertz 3-13-14  A cyber espionage operation by China seven years ago produced sensitive technology and aircraft secrets that were incorporated into the latest version of China’s new J-20 stealth fighter jet, according to U.S. officials and private defense analysts.

The Chinese cyber spying against the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II took place in 2007 under what U.S. intelligence agencies codenamed Operation Byzantine Hades, a large-scale, multi-year cyber program that targeted governments and industry.

Defense officials said the stolen data was obtained by a Chinese military unit called a Technical Reconnaissance Bureau in the Chengdu province. The data was then passed to the state-run Aviation Industry Corp. of China (AVIC).

An AVIC subsidiary, the Chengdu Aircraft Industry Group, used the stolen data in building the J-20, said defense and intelligence officials familiar with reports of the illicit tech transfer.

Screen shot 2014-03-13 at 10.52.02 AMThe newly unveiled J-20 jet fighter / Chinese website

Pentagon technology security officials in 2011 opposed a joint venture between General Electric and AVIC over concerns that U.S. fighter jet technology would be diverted to AVIC’s military aircraft programs.
The Obama administration ignored the concerns and instead has since promoted the systematic loosening of technology controls on transfers to China.

The Office of Director of National Intelligence is known to have details of AVIC’s past involvement in illicit arms transfers and its role in obtaining sensitive F-35 technology through cyber espionage, the officials said.

The F-35 data theft was confirmed after recent photographs were published on Chinese websites showing a newer version of the J-20. The new version of the radar-evading aircraft had incorporated several design upgrades since the first demonstrator aircraft was revealed in 2011.

According to the officials, the J-20 has progressed from prototype to demonstrator. One of its most significant weapons enhancements is a new electro-optical targeting system under its nose.

Additionally, protruding engine nozzles seen in the earlier version have been hidden, an attempt to further reduce the jet’s radar signature. The newest J-20 also appeared with a different radar-absorbing coating.

Photos of the newer J-20 were first posted online on Chinese military forums on Jan. 17.

The Pentagon’s Defense Science Board revealed earlier this year that system design information on the F-35 was obtained from cyber attacks.

The new Terminal High Altitude Area Defense missile systems and Patriot Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3) missile defenses, along with many other systems, were compromised through cyber espionage, the board said in a report.

Most details of the Chinese cyber espionage campaign to obtain F-35 technology remain secret.

However, the Chinese probably obtained the F-35 secrets from Lockheed Martin, its subcontractors, or U.S. allies involved in the development program. Allies that took part in the F-35 program include the United Kingdom, Israel, Italy, Australia, Canada, Norway, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Turkey.

A Chinese Academy of Military Sciences official, Du Wenlong, told Chinese state television on Feb. 20 that the new J-20’s shortened exhaust nozzles, along with tail and vertical fin modifications, are designed to reduce radar detection.

Du also said that a “revolutionary” breakthrough allowed the twin engines to increase both power and reliability.

China’s inability to manufacture quality jet engines has been a weakness of its aircraft manufacturing programs.

Du also said that the electro-optical targeting system provides better surveillance and strike capabilities against both land and sea targets.

The J-20 also has a larger weapons bay than the U.S. F-22, which allows it to carry more powerful missiles that can be used against “aircraft carrier and foreign AEGIS ships,” Du said.

U.S. officials said the new J-20 had undergone ground tests, but it had not been flight tested as of early March.

Richard Fisher, a specialist on Chinese weapon systems, said the new J-20 was flight tested on March 1 and demonstrated the enhanced fifth generation jet fighter features.

Fisher, with the International Assessment and Strategy Center, said it is “very curious” that the new J-20 featured its new electronic targeting system under its nose. That location increased its field of view and is similar to the targeting system on the F-35.

“This targeting system and a set of distributed high-power infrared sensors give the F-35 a previously unrivaled ‘situational awareness,’ but the now it is clear that the J-20 will have a similar targeting system and its own set of distributed sensors,” Fisher said.

“If as part of their espionage, China had also gained engineering insights into the F-35′s very advanced sensor systems, that could prove disastrous to its combat potential barring a rapid redesign and improvements before entering service,” Fisher added.

Advanced sensors on the F-35 were intended as insurance for the jet not having the best capabilities for maneuvering in flight, he said.

“But if the Chinese, via cyberespionage, have gained insights into its sensor system, then it is to be expected that China is also working on ways to jam or otherwise degrade its advantage,” Fisher said.

The J-20 targeting system indicates that the Chinese plan to use the jet for ground attack and air superiority missions like the F-35, he said, adding that it now appears the J-20 will be comparable to the more capable F-22.

“We can be assured that J-20 production will significantly exceed that of the 187 F-22 fighters cut off by the Obama Administration in 2010,” he said.

China’s Communist Party-affiliated Global Times reported Jan. 20 that China obtained key technologies from the F-35 and incorporated them into the J-20

The newspaper did not admit stealing the technology, but stated that China “completely obtained the six key technologies” from the F-35.

Those features include the electro-optical targeting system and a diverterless supersonic inlet, a thrust-vectoring jet nozzle, and a fire-control array radar system.

The Global Times disclosures about F-35 technology acquisition were first reported in the Washington Times.
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Offline Rapunzel

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2014, 06:58:37 PM »
Clinton handed over our secrets to the Chinese when he was President - why would we think Obama hasn't been doing the same thing?
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Offline Howie66

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2014, 08:01:39 PM »
Clinton handed over our secrets to the Chinese when he was President - why would we think Obama hasn't been doing the same thing?

Good thing that I continued reading. I would have posted the same thang.   :beer:
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Offline Rapunzel

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2014, 08:31:59 PM »
Good thing that I continued reading. I would have posted the same thang.   :beer:

After Clinton left office I read Bill Gertz book where he laid it all out for us..... fact is American manufacturers don't really care who they sell to as long as the CEO's can line their pockets.
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Offline Howie66

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2014, 08:37:43 PM »
After Clinton left office I read Bill Gertz book where he laid it all out for us..... fact is American manufacturers don't really care who they sell to as long as the CEO's can line their pockets.

It's also interesting to note just how many of these same CEOs love to contribute to people like Clinton, Obama and RATs/RINOs in general.
I come in peace, I didn't bring artillery.  But I am pleading with you with tears in my eyes:  If you bleep with me, I'll kill you all.

Marine General James Mattis, to Iraqi tribal leaders (Note: Mattis did NOT say "BLEEP". He threw the F Bomb)

I didn't enlist in the Corps just to watch my country become a Third World Communist Shit-hole. Don't know anyone who did.

Offline Rapunzel

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2014, 09:06:23 PM »
It's also interesting to note just how many of these same CEOs love to contribute to people like Clinton, Obama and RATs/RINOs in general.

That it is.
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline Oceander

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2014, 01:00:21 AM »
After Clinton left office I read Bill Gertz book where he laid it all out for us..... fact is American manufacturers don't really care who they sell to as long as the CEO's can line their pockets.

Uhmm, not to put to fine a point on it, but isn't that sort of the ne plus ultra of free markets and capitalism - selling to whomever will pay the highest price?  And if all that's involved is selling - healthy free market activity - then isn't what's earned just honest profit, not lining of pockets?

Offline Rapunzel

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2014, 01:09:14 AM »
Uhmm, not to put to fine a point on it, but isn't that sort of the ne plus ultra of free markets and capitalism - selling to whomever will pay the highest price?  And if all that's involved is selling - healthy free market activity - then isn't what's earned just honest profit, not lining of pockets?

Not sure giving our top secret plans to our top secret military equipment calls in that category... at least to me.. some things are propitiatory and should remain that way... he gave them actual plans to our top of the line subs and aircraft carriers, not to mention our planes.
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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2014, 01:21:54 AM »
Not sure giving our top secret plans to our top secret military equipment calls in that category... at least to me.. some things are propitiatory and should remain that way... he gave them actual plans to our top of the line subs and aircraft carriers, not to mention our planes.

Then it's the government's job to make sure top secret secrets stay that way and that when it deals with a business it writes into its contracts sufficient secrecy requirements as well as mechanisms to verify that secrecy is being maintained.  That is precisely how any garden-variety business with trade secrets protects its trade secrets when it deals with other businesses, so I fail to see why the government cannot do that as well.  The verification methods should be robust enough to catch all high potential problems before too much is lost, and the agreed upon penalties in the contract should be severe enough to ensure that the private businesses' interests are fully aligned with those of the government.  Otherwise, I find it hard to denigrate a business for doing precisely what it's supposed to be doing - making a profit selling its wares for the highest price offered.

Offline Rapunzel

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2014, 01:29:56 AM »
Then it's the government's job to make sure top secret secrets stay that way and that when it deals with a business it writes into its contracts sufficient secrecy requirements as well as mechanisms to verify that secrecy is being maintained.  That is precisely how any garden-variety business with trade secrets protects its trade secrets when it deals with other businesses, so I fail to see why the government cannot do that as well.  The verification methods should be robust enough to catch all high potential problems before too much is lost, and the agreed upon penalties in the contract should be severe enough to ensure that the private businesses' interests are fully aligned with those of the government.  Otherwise, I find it hard to denigrate a business for doing precisely what it's supposed to be doing - making a profit selling its wares for the highest price offered.

Yes, but in the case of the Clinton Administration they were fine with  these companies to sell our secret plans to the Chinese. 
« Last Edit: March 16, 2014, 01:30:53 AM by Rapunzel »
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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2014, 01:33:05 AM »
Take Loral for instance - a company I know a little bit about since a very good friend worked for them before moving to Washinton to work for Boeing

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/special/campfin/stories/loral052598.htm

Big Donor Calls Favorable Treatment a 'Coincidence'

By Ruth Marcus and John Mintz
Washington Post Staff Writers
Monday, May 25, 1998; Page A1

In June 1994, Bernard L. Schwartz, the chairman of Loral Corp., wrote his first six-figure check to the Democratic Party, donating $100,000 to the Democratic National Committee.

Around the same time, Schwartz asked to be included on a trade mission being organized by then-Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown to China, where his company hoped to win a piece of the growing telecommunications market. On the trip, Brown arranged a meeting for Schwartz and a rival industry executive with the Chinese communications minister – a session that, as Schwartz recalled it yesterday, "helped open doors that were not open before."

The Clinton administration has been good to Bernard Schwartz, and he to it. Schwartz, a lifelong Democrat and longtime political donor, dramatically ratcheted up his giving after President Clinton took office, contributing a total of more than $1 million to Democratic party committees since then.

And as it has adopted policies favorable to U.S. companies seeking and doing business in China, the administration has taken steps favorable to Loral.

Last February, Clinton approved the company's request to launch a commercial telecommunications satellite aboard a Chinese rocket, choosing to side with the State Department's assessment of the launch as "in the national interest" rather than with Justice Department concerns that approval would interfere with an ongoing criminal investigation. Justice was – and still is – looking into whether Loral and another company provided unauthorized assistance to China's ballistic missile program after an unsuccessful previous launch.

Schwartz, a self-described "Democratic populist" who has spent his career in an industry dominated by Republicans, says the "confluence" of his own increased contributions and the Clinton administration's favorable treatment of his company was "just coincidence." He stepped up his political contributions at the same time that his own wealth increased, big-ticket giving to political parties soared and a Democratic president was elected whom Schwartz describes as "the most friendly to business of any in a long time."

But Republicans have seized on Schwartz and Loral to accuse the administration of essentially selling out U.S. national security for big bucks to the Democratic party. "You have major concessions made by the president on technology transfers which adversely affect national security," Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.), said on Fox News Sunday yesterday. "These transfers are made at a time exactly when these enormous contributions were being made. ... It raises a very substantial question."

Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Calif.), who is to head a select House committee looking into the technology transfer, took a more detached view of the matter on NBC's "Meet the Press" yesterday, carefully separating the inquiry into a possible national security threat from questions about campaign finance. His committee's first step, Cox said, is to ask, "What really happened? Second, if it's as bad as it looks or possibly even worse, how did it happen? And once we figure that out, we can infer some possible solutions. But I think we're a long way away from trying to point the finger at any individual just now."

Saying he wants to ensure that the committee of five Republicans and three Democrats is "very collegial," Cox pledged, "It won't be political theater in the form of flashy congressional hearings."

Schwartz also took to the Sunday talk show circuit yesterday, making his case that he "never sought a favor nor got a favor" from the Clinton administration. He came from his maiden appearance on ABC's "This Week" to The Washington Post to explain his political generosity and argue that he got nothing for it besides good government.

"I don't see anything wrong with looking at the performance of the administration and saying this is worth supporting, but the implication that this is a quid pro quo is just outrageous," he said.

Loral, he said, "did not need, expect or receive any special treatment." Indeed, Schwartz noted, the company obtained one of its most lucrative governmental contracts, for weather satellites, from the Bush administration – and lost it at the Commerce Department under Brown's tenure.

And Schwartz pointed out that during the same period that he has made major political contributions he also has given more than $10 million to hospitals and schools and more than $18 million to Loral employees – half the $36 million bonus he received in the 1996 sale of Loral Corp. to Lockheed Martin. (Schwartz spun off Loral's commercial activities, and now oversees them as chairman of Loral Space and Communications.)

National Security Adviser Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger, speaking on CBS News's "Face the Nation," said, "The fact that Mr. Schwartz was a contributor to the Democratic party was not a factor that was known to me. That's not part of my job."

Asked whether Clinton was aware of Schwartz's giving, Berger changed the subject.

It seems unlikely that Clinton, always closely involved in his own campaign fund-raising, was not aware of Schwartz's loyalty. In a 1994 memorandum, then Deputy White House chief of staff Harold Ickes recommended that Clinton call Schwartz to solicit contributions for a $3 million party advertising blitz. "I have it on very good authority that Mr. Schwartz is prepared to do anything he can for the administration," Ickes wrote.

In an interview last week, Ickes recalled Schwartz as a man who has "never thrown his weight around. ... So many people who operate at this level, they're always basically acting in a tone of voice and a demeanor that they expect a meeting with the deputy chief of staff or they expect tickets to this or they expect special privilege on a receiving line, whatever the little dinky perks are. He never did that."

Recalled one former Democratic National Committee official, "He was really sort of your perfect donor – just wanted to attend events and never asked for anything."

Schwartz has always been a loner, shunned by his fellow CEOs in the defense and space industry – the only liberal Democrat, as well as the only non-engineer to lead a major aerospace company in recent years.

He traces his Democratic roots to his grandfather, a Tammany Hall functionary in New York who died after catching pneumonia while campaigning for the party around the turn of the century. For decades after, Schwartz's grandmother received a holiday turkey from the Democratic machine. "It left an impression that my family was connected to somebody who cares," Schwartz said in an interview last year.

In the late 1960s, he worked as an accountant for a Wall Street takeover artist. In 1971, at a rushed midtown Manhattan lunch, a friend persuaded him to buy Loral, then a floundering defense firm. He quickly turned it around, and over the next 25 years gobbled up 16 more defense companies, becoming the industry's paramount dealmaker and a pacesetter in the trend toward aerospace mergers.

Liberal politics were always a sideline to his empire-building, Schwartz said yesterday. During the Vietnam War, he would argue vociferously against U.S. intervention with generals and Pentagon officials, then sign more contracts to provide them with armaments.

Schwartz donated to Democrats along the way, along with a few key Republicans, but his political giving rose sharply after Clinton took office.

He first met Clinton at a Manhattan dinner party hosted by a friend in 1992, before the then-Arkansas governor had announced his presidential run. The defense executive was taken by Clinton's quick grasp of the industry issues the two men discussed. He became one of Clinton's earliest supporters in the business community.

"He's just smart and he's fun and he has a good sense of humor," Schwartz said. "He calls me his friend and I am proud that he does that. But we don't shoot golf together."

Still, as Schwartz has written check after check to Democratic party committees – from $25,000 in 1991-92 to $112,000 in 1993-94, $602,000 in 1995-96 and $421,000 so far this election cycle – the White House has been assiduous in courting him. Now the party's largest single individual donor, Schwartz was twice invited to stay in the Lincoln bedroom but couldn't make it. He attended state dinners for the emperor of Japan and British Prime Minister Tony Blair, and was toasted at a White House dinner two years ago on his 70th birthday.

He said he has never asked for a business favor. "It would have been imposing on a friendly relationship to advance my parochial interest with the president," he said. "It's awesome to go to the White House, an extraordinary privilege."

But the administration has helped out anyway – sometimes with steps specific to Loral, more often with policies designed to help U.S. businesses compete in a global market. In 1996, for example, the administration blessed Lockheed Martin Corp.'s acquisition of Loral's defense divisions.

That same year, after a bruising interagency battle, the Clinton administration tried to help ease the bureaucratic way for satellite makers – Loral and others – to gain government approval for their international ventures by transferring control of the process from the State Department to the Commerce Department.

Schwartz was enlisted by another industry executive to be one of the signers of a letter to Clinton asking the president to approve the transfer of satellite export licensing from the State Department to Commerce. "Your decision will greatly enhance the ability of U.S. manufacturers to retain our global competitiveness," the letter said.

Yesterday, Schwartz said the controversy over his donations would not cause him to close his checkbook. "I'm not going to be intimidated by this flap," he said. "The conspiracy thinkers who see a ghost behind every door can say what they want."

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline Rapunzel

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2014, 01:38:40 AM »
Side note:  Loral sold out to Lockheed in 1996.........


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/06/14/world/us-fines-lockheed-13-million-in-china-satellite-case.html


U.S. Fines Lockheed $13 Million in China Satellite Case
By DAVID E. SANGER
Published: June 14, 2000

The Lockheed Martin Corporation has agreed to pay $13 million to the government to settle a case involving the sale of satellite technology to China in 1994, company and Clinton administration officials said today.

The company was charged with violating arms export laws. The settlement, which officials said is likely to be announced on Wednesday by the State Department, is the largest civil penalty ever assessed under the Arms Export Control Act, the primary law regulating sales of American technology.

A criminal investigation is still under way over whether the Loral Space and Communication Corporation also violated export controls in a separate incident. The Lockheed Martin settlement may put pressure on Loral to settle that case.


Quote
But it also allows the Clinton administration -- which has been charged with laxness in keeping sensitive technology out of Chinese hands -- to argue in the midst of a presidential election year that it is enforcing export control laws.


In a statement tonight, Lockheed Martin's spokesman, James Fetig, confirmed that the company, the world's largest military manufacturer, had decided to settle the case, in which the State Department had charged the company with 30 violations of arms export laws. He said that under the agreement, Lockheed Martin neither admits nor denies the allegations.

The financial settlement came close to the maximum penalty of $15 million. But under the terms of the accord, officials said, the company is spared a far more costly fate: a suspension of its rights to export satellite technology.

In its statement, Lockheed Martin said, ''The corporation appreciates the opportunity to enter into a settlement agreement with the Department of State that resolves the charges.

''We are committed to full compliance with all export control measures and believe this agreement will allow us to assure the State Department that we will meet all of our export control obligations.''

At issue in the case was a series of interchanges between Lockheed Martin rocket experts and the Chinese about kick motors, which are small rocket motors that are used to lift a satellite into its final orbit. At the time of the exchanges, Chinese-made kick motors had suffered a number of failures. Martin Marietta Aerospace, which was later acquired by Lockheed, provided help to AsiaSat, a satellite company based in Hong Kong with heavy financial ties to the Chinese government. AsiaSat was a client of Martin Marietta.

The technical transfers caused considerable concern within the State and Defense Departments. The same kick-motor technology that helps China in launching commercial communications satellites, officials said, could help its military launch spy satellites. In April, the State Department spokesman at the time, James P. Rubin, said ''any assistance to Chinese technical capability in space launch has the potential to be applied to missile development.''

Moreover, the State Department charged that Martin Marietta had failed to clear its technical analysis of the rocket problems with Washington before passing it on to the Chinese, and had made no effort later to retrieve it. The company said at the time that it had violated no laws.

At the time, the Clinton administration was encouraging more commercial interchanges between American and Chinese satellite companies. But the rules on those transfers have since been tightened by Congress, in reaction to disclosures that in 1996, two years after the Martin Marietta incident, Loral had helped Chinese rocket makers solve a different set of technical problems.

Those transfers, officials say, raised more security concerns than Martin Marietta's help to AsiaSat.

Under the civil agreement, Lockheed Martin will be allowed to use $5 million of its fine to install computer systems that would give the American government access to all of its foreign space and missile deals. The access is to include data that might require licenses for export.
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2014, 04:00:45 AM »
The verification methods should be robust enough to catch all high potential problems before too much is lost, and the agreed upon penalties in the contract should be severe enough to ensure that the private businesses' interests are fully aligned with those of the government.  Otherwise, I find it hard to denigrate a business for doing precisely what it's supposed to be doing - making a profit selling its wares for the highest price offered.

While I agree, in the main, with your argument you are relying on the honesty of the purchaser. Once they have purchased a piece of kit (say an electro optical targeting system) what is to stop them cracking the case and reverse engineering it to produce their own? Or, like weapons and ammunition, falsifying the end user certificates needed for export.
It's not like these are sealed and mysterious black boxes that self destruct if you try to examine them - they do need to be repairable.
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Offline Gazoo

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2014, 04:43:50 AM »
The Clinton's toasted with red China in our White House. Obama bows to them.

And screw the corrupt media for not calling out the democrats on their, 'the GOP is stuck in the 1950's' garbage. I saw a CNN thing that says we are back to this era. The, we are the world hippie, war protesting radicals are boneheaded numbnuts running our country now.
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Offline Rapunzel

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #14 on: March 16, 2014, 07:34:56 PM »
While I agree, in the main, with your argument you are relying on the honesty of the purchaser. Once they have purchased a piece of kit (say an electro optical targeting system) what is to stop them cracking the case and reverse engineering it to produce their own? Or, like weapons and ammunition, falsifying the end user certificates needed for export.
It's not like these are sealed and mysterious black boxes that self destruct if you try to examine them - they do need to be repairable.

They didn't need to reverse engineer - Clinton and Loral and Northrup, etc. gave them the actual plans... read these books by Bill Gertz.....

Betrayal: Betrayal: How the Clinton Administration Undermined American Security

Enemies: How America's Foes Steal Our Vital Secrets--and How We Let It Happen

Treachery: How America's Friends and Foes Are Secretly Arming Our Enemies

and

The Failure Factory: How Unelected Bureaucrats, Liberal Democrats, and Big Government Republicans Are Undermining...

yes... I have read them all........
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

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Re: STOLEN F 35 SECRETS SHOW UP IN CHINA’S STEALTH FIGHTER
« Reply #15 on: March 16, 2014, 10:10:06 PM »
While I agree, in the main, with your argument you are relying on the honesty of the purchaser. Once they have purchased a piece of kit (say an electro optical targeting system) what is to stop them cracking the case and reverse engineering it to produce their own? Or, like weapons and ammunition, falsifying the end user certificates needed for export.
It's not like these are sealed and mysterious black boxes that self destruct if you try to examine them - they do need to be repairable.

Any purchaser of sophisticated hardware - like the US government - would/should be well enough aware of that issue to have it taken into account in the contracts they enter into with private manufacturers.


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