Author Topic: WTH? Missouri House Republicans Pass Bill to Allow Red-Light Cameras …Update: Dead in the Senate?  (Read 411 times)

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Offline happyg

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In 2012 Republicans won a super-majority in the Missouri House and Senate.

So what are they doing with their veto-proof majority to further the conservative cause in Missouri? Well, today they passed the legal framework for red light cameras.
 What gives, GOP?
Bellevile News Democrat reported:

The Missouri House narrowly voted to pass legislation Thursday that could let cities continue operating red-light and speed cameras, but only if they meet certain guidelines and get prior approval from state officials.

The Republican-led House sent the measure to the Senate with an 84-63 vote, a tally that is just three votes more than the minimum number required to pass a bill out of the chamber.

The measure would prevent drivers statewide from accruing penalty points for violations caught by a red-light or speed camera and would allow municipalities to fine drivers up to $135 for each ticket issued using a camera.

Sponsoring Rep. Dave Hinson, R-St. Clair, said he opposes traffic cameras, but sponsored the bill because legislation to prohibit them has not garnered enough support in previous years. Supporters argued that his measure would streamline photo traffic enforcement throughout the state.

“They are here at this point. We need to do something to regulate them so that there are not all these different regulations and ordinances and fines and penalties,” said Rep. Rochelle Walton Gray, D-Black Jack.

Opponents contend the bill would pave the way for more red-light cameras and that the Legislature should focus on prohibiting them altogether.


I spoke with conservative Senator Jim Lembke (District 1 – MO) and he promised – “This bill is dead in the Missouri Senate. I will make sure of it.” Let’s hope so.

By Jim Hoft
http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/

Offline Rapunzel

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They existed - for a while - in Phoenix, Mesa and Scottsdale.  People sued and won, the cameras were removed.
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline happyg

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They existed - for a while - in Phoenix, Mesa and Scottsdale.  People sued and won, the cameras were removed.

Same here. I don't think they lasted a month. LOL!

Offline Oceander

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I really don't see anything wrong with red light cameras, so what's the beef with them?  At least you don't get points on your license the way you would if a cop pulled you over for running a red light.

Offline happyg

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I really don't see anything wrong with red light cameras, so what's the beef with them?  At least you don't get points on your license the way you would if a cop pulled you over for running a red light.

What if someone else is driving your car? Another problem is the white line. Some cars were stopped at a red light, but the tires were past the white line, so it was assumed by the camera the car ran a red light.

Offline Oceander

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What if someone else is driving your car?

That's why you don't get any points on your license - the point system is to punish the actual driver; since they can't identify the driver, they don't assess points.  As far as the fine goes, however, the owner of a car generally bears liability for the acts of the person he lends that car to, so I really don't see the problem with fining the owner for having lent his car to someone who then runs a red light with it.  The owner is in the best position to prevent that from happening - don't lend your car to someone whose driving you do not trust completely - and therefore should bear the consequences if it does happen.

Quote
Another problem is the white line.  Some cars were stopped at a red light, but the tires were past the white line, so it was assumed by the camera the car ran a red light.

I can't speak for all of the various types of systems, but the ones that I know of don't use the white line as any sort of a reference point.  Instead, the system works as follows:

two cameras are set up for each intersecting street, with the cameras on opposite sides of the intersection.  When the light changes to red, a strobe flashes, and the cameras capture an image of whatever happens to be in the intersection at the time.  Because of the way the cameras are aimed, your license plates - front and back - will only show up in both pictures if you were in the middle of the intersection immediately after the light changed.  If you were to just go over the white line at one side of the intersection, but not actually continue on into the intersection, then only one of the cameras would have a photo of your license plate and you wouldn't get assessed a fine.  It's actually an ingenious setup if you think about it.



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