Author Topic: COLLEGE PROFESSOR: COMMON CORE DESTROYING A GENERATION OF ILLITERATE AMERICANS  (Read 1626 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Rapunzel

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 71,719
http://patriotsbillboard.org/college-professor-common-core-destroying-a-generation-of-illiterate-americans/


COLLEGE PROFESSOR: COMMON CORE DESTROYING A GENERATION OF ILLITERATE AMERICANS
Posted on February 20, 2014 by PatriotsBillboard   

College professor says Common Core will create a generation of culturally illiterate Americans

Ben Velderman 2-20-14 America’s ongoing and growing debate about Common Core has largely revolved around the immediate effects of the new learning standards – namely how they will impact students’ data privacy, teachers’ job evaluations and states’ constitutional rights to control public education.


And when the discussion turns the learning standards themselves, it’s the math standards that get the lion’s share of attention. That’s because Common Core’s nonsensical approach to math instruction has parents and students – and even some teachers – throwing up their hands in frustration.

Precious little time has been spent examining how Common Core’s English standards are changing what American students are learning about their nation’s history, identity and culture. Even less has been said about the long-term effects these changes will have on “the land of the free and the home of the brave.”
Hillsdale history professor Terrence Moore is trying to kick-start that discussion with the recent release of his book, “The Story-Killers: A Common-Sense Case Against the Common Core.”

In his book, Moore argues that the stories Americans are taught in school are of the upmost importance because they help shape the values and ideals which influence the way future generations view the world. That worldview, in turn, will impact the way our future leaders, parents and voters approach politics and economics, as well as family and moral issues.

Moore bases his theory on an observation from the ancient philosopher Plato: Whoever controls a nation’s poets and storytellers ultimately controls the government.

That’s why Moore is so alarmed that Common Core de-emphasizes the role of classic literature and classic authors – and the traditional American and western values they represent – and replaces them with “informational texts” and post-modern, multi-cultural literature that is steeped in a left-wing worldview.
“The Common Core, at least as far as the English standards are concerned … is the attempt to take away the great stories of the American people and replace them with the stories that fit the progressive, liberal narrative of the world,” Moore said in a recent speech. “As such, the architects of the Common Core are nothing less than story-killers. … They’re deliberately killing the greatest stories of the greatest nation in history.”


Less literature, more diversity

Such talk will make Common Core defenders howl in protest, but they’ll have to concede many of the points on which Moore makes his claim.

The first is that Common Core slowly but surely removes serious literature from the classroom. That’s self-evident from the standards’ requirement that “informational texts” comprise a greater and greater percentage of students’ reading as they go through school.

In fact, by the time students reach their final two years of high school, 70 percent of their reading assignments will come from non-fiction, information-based texts.

Moore describes this shift as putting contemporary journalism on par with Shakespeare.
While the world of “informational texts” is pretty wide-open and not necessarily a left-wing stronghold, Moore believes most school district leaders will not select the readings themselves to ensure a proper balance, but will simply purchase a “class in a box” curriculum from a major textbook publisher.

Moore contends that most textbook editors are so ideological that “progressivism seems natural to them.” That means students will likely encounter “informational” readings that are critical of capitalism, sympathetic toward socialism, and misleading or incomplete in their presentation of U.S. history and constitutional principles.

Even with this shift toward non-fiction, Moore acknowledges that some literature will still be taught in classrooms, but warns the type of stories presented to students will be changing. He bases that on language found in Appendix B to Common Core’s English standards that exhorts teachers to present students with “a range” of authors.

“What do they mean by a range of authors?” Moore asked during his recent speech. “Well, for the most part, they mean post-modern authors, multi-cultural authors – in other words, other than traditional authors. Because they want a lot of these put in the curriculum every year of the class.

“So if you were trying to spend an entire year on the classics in the freshman year and then another year on British literature in the sophomore year, or something like that, you’d be violating one of the fundamental principles of Common Core, which says you always have to have a range of authors.”
‘Cultural orphans’

Moore says Common Core’s effort to nudge America’s great literature out of classrooms is also evident in the English standards’ Appendix B, which offers a list of “exemplar texts” to provide educators with “guideposts” of the kinds of texts that fit best with Common Core.

According to the history professor, the model reading assignments contain “an overwhelming number of post-modern authors” and completely lack works that are either directly or indirectly inspired by religion.
The list also ignores classroom reading staples such as Aesop’s fables, classic fairy tales, the “tall tales” of Paul Bunyan and Pecos Bill, Hans Christian Anderson, Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” and Charles Dickens.

Those omissions represent a significant change from the reading assignments of yesteryear.
“We used to speak of our culture in terms of being descended from two parents: Athens on the one hand, Jerusalem on the other,” Moore said, referring to classic Western literature and Bible-inspired readings such as “Paradise Lost” by John Milton.

“What’s going on in the Common Core standards is they’ve killed off one of the parents – that’s Jerusalem – and the other is ailing. So pretty soon we’ll be cultural orphans.”

Moore warns that even if some great American literature makes it into classrooms, the selections will presented in a “drive-by” fashion to prepare students for the way the texts will appear on a Common Core-aligned standardized test. He calls this the “practice of practicing for standardized exams.”
Since students won’t be asked to read an entire novel during such a test, most teachers won’t ask kids to read one for class. Instead, students will be given anthologies that contain brief excerpts of great books – such as Moby Dick – that will leave them with only a superficial understanding of the works.

A pre-emptive response to critics

Common Core supporters have responded to similar criticisms by noting that the standards are merely the overall concepts schools must teach students, and that schools are free to use whichever lessons, books and instructional materials they want to meet those standards.

Balderdash, says Moore.

Because teachers’ job evaluations will be linked to their students’ standardized test scores, Moore believes educators will only teach to the Common Core-aligned assessments. That means the tests will become “the hammer” that ensures schools teach multi-cultural, post-modern stories and authors instead of the time-honored American classics.

As Moore put it in his recent speech, “Whoever controls the testing controls the curriculum – period.”
Despite the progressives’ crafty plans to “control the storytelling” in our nation’s classrooms, Moore doesn’t believe all hope is lost. He says the Common Core architects didn’t expect Americans to fight for their stories, which help develop the minds and souls of the nation’s youth.

Nor did they expect moms would push back against the education overhaul because of the negative effect it’s having on their children’s “heart and happiness.”

Moore summed it up this way in his January speech:

“There’s nothing a suburban mom – or any mom, for that matter – cares more about than the heart and the happiness of her children. And when that comes into danger, suburban moms who vote and who know how to organize themselves … they will mobilize people and they will take action. And state legislators will have to listen. …

“This is a fight over our schools, and ultimately the souls and minds of our nation’s young people. This is the time to take our stories back. Then after we do that, we can take our schools back. And once we have our schools back, we’re on the road to taking our nation back.”
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline Rapunzel

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 71,719
http://wyomingagainstcommoncore.wordpress.com/2014/03/02/common-core-issues-true-story/


March 2, 2014   
Common Core Issues…True Story!

This is PERFECT!  Most of the time I get these types of questions…

“Which standard exactly are you talking about?”

“I don’t see anything wrong and I’ve read the standards!”

“Kids need to be prepared for the future we can’t even imagine”…(I’m pretty sure my HS teachers didn’t ever imagine using Twitter or Ipads in class,  yet we are doing JUST fine!).

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline EC

  • Shanghaied Editor
  • Member
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 23,518
  • Cats rule. Dogs drool.
Quote
COLLEGE PROFESSOR: COMMON CORE DESTROYING A GENERATION OF ILLITERATE AMERICANS

The idea understandably incenses headline writers. They like being functionally illiterate.  :whistle:
The universe doesn't hate you. Unless your name is Tsutomu Yamaguchi

Avatar courtesy of Oceander

I've got a website now: Smoke and Ink

Offline mountaineer

  • Member
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 35,116
Culturally illiterate -  not to mention language, science, history and mathematics illiterate.
The only difference between the Democrats and the Republicans is that the Democrats allow the poor to be corrupt, too.
--- Oscar Levant

Online Oceander

  • Technical
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 45,473
  • #ToldYouSo
Culturally illiterate -  not to mention language, science, history and mathematics illiterate.

considering the widespread illiteracy we've achieved under the current mish-mash of weak so-called "standards" we can't do any worse under new standards that are (a) more rigorous and (b) more uniform across school districts.

Furthermore, that current illiteracy demonstrates that on this point the anti-common-core people have it wrong:  illiteracy results primarily from how students are taught or, to be more precise, not taught, and little if at all from the standards used to measure the achievement of those students.

Offline mountaineer

  • Member
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 35,116
Quote
illiteracy results primarily from how students are taught or, to be more precise, not taught
That's why I mentioned math illiteracy. Common core has the kiddies going through umpteen unnecessary steps to solve simple math problems. It's the how that is the problem.

More
The only difference between the Democrats and the Republicans is that the Democrats allow the poor to be corrupt, too.
--- Oscar Levant

Offline Rapunzel

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 71,719
http://twitchy.com/2014/03/05/another-common-core-math-problem-that-makes-no-sense-whatsoever/?utm_source=autotweet&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=twitter

Another Common Core ‘math’ problem that ‘makes no sense whatsoever’

Posted at 2:15 pm on March 5, 2014 by Twitchy Staff



ChrisZFitness

Kindergarten math homework. Makes no sense whatsoever. #CommonCore should be ashamed

Oh, no. Not the “number bonds” again. What ever happened to straightforward addition and subtraction facts?

Poor Jaiden
« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 07:59:49 PM by Rapunzel »
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline rustynail

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 413
I know which finger they should color.

Online Oceander

  • Technical
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 45,473
  • #ToldYouSo
That's why I mentioned math illiteracy. Common core has the kiddies going through umpteen unnecessary steps to solve simple math problems. It's the how that is the problem.

More


With all due respect, I use all sorts of similar "tricks" when I'm trying to explain a new math concept to my daughter and I can see she's struggling with the "normal" or "usual" way of doing things.

The fact of the matter is, adding 10 to a number is very easy - it's in the nature of a base-10 number system, and it's a lot easier for a kid to pick up that part.  It's also pretty easy to get 7 from 10 - you just subtract 3 - so, one way to count by 7s is to add 10, and then subtract 3.  Those two operations are each a lot easier to do than say, adding 7 to 46, when you're new to math.

In point of fact, I do something similar for multiplication - always have and always will.  For example, when I go to the grocery store I frequently see a price of $1.99 for a certain item.  If I'm trying to juggle a budget for some reason and I need to know how much 17 of these items is going to cost, I can either multiply 1.99 by 17, or I can multiply $2 by 17 and then subtract 17 cents.  Which do you suppose is easier?

There's another alternative they've introduced in the schools since I was in elementary school to help kids figure out how to do two-digit multiplication:  it's called chunking, or grouping (I've heard both).  Basically, you break each number down into its 10s component and its 1s component, put them on the sides of a 2x2 grid, do the multiplication for each grid box, then add the rows up first, and finally add the sums of each row together to get your final answer.

So, if one has to multiply 21 by 45, you would decompose (yes, that word applies to this situation - for example when it comes up in modern algebra, a college level math course) those numbers into the sums 20 + 1 and 40 + 5.  You would then arrange them around a 2x2 grid like so:

       20        1
      ---------------
40 |        |        |
      ---------------
  5 |        |        |
     ----------------

You would then multiply each grid, add up the rows, and finally add the sums of each row, like so:


       20        1
      ---------------
40 | 800 |   40 |    = 840
      ---------------
  5 | 100 |    5  |    = 105
     ----------------      ------
                                945

(btw, that is, in fact, the correct answer).

What makes this a lot easier to do is that in each case you are basically just multiplying two single digit numbers together and then adding the correct number of zeroes to the right-hand side of the product.  For example, 40 x 20 is basically just 4 x 2, with two 0s tacked onto the back.  Kids can get this much more readily than, say, traditional long multiplication in columns.  Using this method in conjunction with demonstrating long multiplication to the kids helps them to "get it" much more readily than if they were just being drilled on multiplication by columns alone.

Another, more subtle, thing to point out is that this is, in fact, helping to get them more comfortable with concepts they will soon enough see when they get to algebra.  Why?  Because that grid method is analytically equal to finding the product of (20 + 1) x (40 + 5), which is a specific instance of the more general algabraic equation (a + b) x (c + d).  It's even a good way to visualize the narrower algebraic equation of (a + b)^2 = c, which is equal to (a + b) x (a + b) = c, which in turn is equal to the quadratic equation a^2 + 2ab + b^2 = c.

Another technique my daughter's teacher showed her, which actually irked me until I finally realized what was going on, was approaching long division - with answers expressed in terms of a quotient and a remainder - by having the kids subtract out "chunks" of numbers - determined by picking some simple number, such as 20, 30, or 50, and multiplying it by the divisor, to have them get as close as possible to the dividend to the point where they cannot subtract any more multiples of the divisor.  Does my description make a lot of sense?  Probably not, which is why I was puzzled at first, too.  Here's an illustration that should make it clearer:

Suppose you want to divide 195 by 7.  To do it by chunks, you could do the following:  first, try multiplying 7 by 20; that is 140, which is less than 195, so we know our eventual answer will be bigger than 20.  To get closer to that answer we then subtract 140 from 195 and keep track of that 20.  We now have 55 left, which is bigger than 7 so we know we can subtract more multiples of 7.  This time we try 10; but 7 times 10 is 70, which is bigger than 55, so we know that 10 is too big; however, we also know that we're getting close and that the next number we have to pick will be a single-digit number.  And that's good because kids find single-digit multiplication a lot easier to deal with.  So, since 10 doesn't work, we try 9 - too big - 8 - too big - and 7, not too big, so we go with 7.  7 times 7 is 49.  55 minus 49 is 6.  And now we know that we've gone as far as we can because 6 is less than 7.  So, we add up the multiples we subtracted out - 20 plus 7 - and we get the result of 27.  So now we know that the answer to 195 divided by 7 is 27, remainder 6.  And that is the correct answer.

Here's something else that doing long division that way helps to reinforce - the relationship between multiplication and division, and the fact that they are inverse operations; that is, what multiplication does, division undoes.  That's a pretty big concept for elementary school kids to start chewing on.

And the best thing?  By showing kids a number of different ways to analyse - and thus solve - a given problem, one makes it more likely that more of the kdis will actually "get it" because kids learn in different ways and each has his or her own set of strengths and weaknesses, so each kid will find one way easier to grasp than another.

Are there some really dumb things in the new curricula that are being invented to meet the new standards?  Yup, and when I find 'em I write a note to the teacher on the homework pointing that out (typically it'll be an ambiguity in the way the question is asked that leads to two different answers).

So, whether or no there are serious flaws with common core, this is not one of them.


Online Oceander

  • Technical
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 45,473
  • #ToldYouSo
http://twitchy.com/2014/03/05/another-common-core-math-problem-that-makes-no-sense-whatsoever/?utm_source=autotweet&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=twitter

Another Common Core ‘math’ problem that ‘makes no sense whatsoever’

Posted at 2:15 pm on March 5, 2014 by Twitchy Staff



ChrisZFitness

Kindergarten math homework. Makes no sense whatsoever. #CommonCore should be ashamed

Oh, no. Not the “number bonds” again. What ever happened to straightforward addition and subtraction facts?

Poor Jaiden


The only ambiguity in that question is what it means to "draw the cubes you colored in the number bond;" that ambiguity was most likely resolved in class discussion and probably makes sense in the broader context of the class as it's being taught from one day to the next.

Here's what that means, translated for the more traditionally-minded.  It's intended to help kids - this is a kindergarten class after all - start grasping - pun intended - the concept of what it means to add two numbers together to get a third.  This particular problem is looking at it in reverse by giving the kids a number that represents the sum - that would be the "cube stick", i.e., that row of cubes - letting the kids themselves set up the addition operation by coloring the blocks with two different colors - what's nice here is that the kids get to  pick the two addends themselves here, which takes a little bit of the pressure off of "getting the right answer" while still teaching them the concept and, in fact, getting them to the right answer based on the numbers they in effect chose when they decided how many cubes to color red and how many blue.

So, here's how it goes.  First the kids split the total set of cubes - the cube stick - into two groups of cubes, one red and one blue.  By doing that they have implicitly split one large number into two smaller numbers in such a way that, mathematically, the total number of cubes is equal to the sum of the two numbers represented by each set of cubes.  Here the kid - Jaiden - has split the cube stick into the two numbers 1 and 4, represented by 1 blue cube and 4 red cubes.

Second, the kid draws the cubes in the number bond - that three-circle diagram is just another way of visualizing addition - so as I read it, Jaiden would draw 1 blue cube in one lower circle, and 4 red cubes in the other lower circle.  That completes the triplet and visually demonstrates a relationship that is homomorphic with (can be mapped one-to-one and onto) the equation 1 + 4 = 5.

Third, to reinforce the concept of the two smaller numbers actually becoming the bigger number when added together, the kids are then asked to show each smaller number - the "hidden partners" - on her or his fingers (since this is kindergarten, I would guess that the numbers involved will never be greater than 5) - which is important because counting on your fingers is something every kid learns at a very early age, either at home or at school, so kids are most likely to identify each smaller number as a separate "number" when they see it on their fingers - remember, kindergarten kids haven't quite grasped the concept of digits, as distinct from numbers - and they're asked to show their finger counts to an adult so that the adult can make sure the kid got the idea straight.  In other words, was the kid able to make the jump from colored cubes to fingers on the hand through the concept of "number" and were they able to grasp (pun intended) the basic concept that addition is possible because every number can always be expressed as the sum of two smaller numbers.

Finally, the kids are asked to color in the number of fingers they showed, which is another way of memorializing the answer the kid got - so the parents can see it - and also to make it easier to grade papers if for some reason an adult couldn't check each kid's fingers the first time around.


As I see it, that is a rather sophisticated pedagogical tool there, not some senseless game of colors and unfamiliar phrases.

Offline Rapunzel

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 71,719

See the math problems that set off a New York DJ’s anti-Common Core rant ==> http://twitchy.com/2014/03/02/see-the-math-problems-that-set-off-this-ny-djs-anti-common-core-rant/

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline Rapunzel

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 71,719
Common Core ELA Social Justice Activism Indoctrination

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSHoxWaVeto&amp;feature=youtu.be&amp;a" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSHoxWaVeto&amp;feature=youtu.be&amp;a</a>


 This video shows a series of ELA books by Zaner-Bloser with a core theme that is not literature and writing. It is social justice activism for ages 6 and up.


“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Online Oceander

  • Technical
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 45,473
  • #ToldYouSo
See the math problems that set off a New York DJ’s anti-Common Core rant ==> http://twitchy.com/2014/03/02/see-the-math-problems-that-set-off-this-ny-djs-anti-common-core-rant/



That's actually a nice little visual diagram illustrating - literally - what we mean when we say things like "carry the one" or "borrow from the tens".

At the top, we're dealing with subtracting 52 from 134; unfortunately we can't just subtract down each column because, for example, 5 is greater than 3.  So what to do, what to do?  We "borrow" a couple of units from the next higher position in the number 134, we "add" those extra 10 units to the 3 - which gives us 13, btw - and now we can do the actual subtraction.

Visually, that subtraction is accomplished by x-ing out one dot for each unit of value contained in the number being subtracted.  So, in the middle column, the student first "added" in those extra 10 units - shown by the 10 dots at the bottom (5 of which are x-ed out) - and then we x out 5 of those 13 dots, representing the subtraction of 5 from 13.  That gives us the result - 8 - which the student has written at the bottom of the middle column.  On the right-hand column we do the same thing, we have four dots representing the 4 in the ones place in 134 and we x out 2 of them to represent the subtraction of 2 from 4.  That gives us the result - 2 - which the student has written at the bottom of the right-hand column.  For the left-hand column we need do nothing further since there is nothing in the hundreds place of the number being subtracted; however, we need to note that the student correctly x-ed out one unit from the hundreds position in 134 to represent the unit that was borrowed and converted into 10 units in the tens column.  Since there are no dots remaining in the hundreds column, there is nothing to write down.  Consequently, the answer, as visually demonstrated by the graphic the student drew, is that 134 minus 52 is 82.  Checking on my calculator confirms that.

The second question simply calls for the student to abstract that principle and apply it twice, once to a borrowing from the hundreds to the tens, and again as a borrowing from the tens to the ones.

Again, that's a pretty nifty pedagogical tool there.  I wish I'd thought of it when I was trying to help my daughter figure this part of subtraction out.


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf