Author Topic: China Develops Specialized Aerial Refueling  (Read 288 times)

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China Develops Specialized Aerial Refueling
« on: January 16, 2014, 06:18:20 PM »

Offline Chieftain

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Re: China Develops Specialized Aerial Refueling
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2014, 06:44:24 PM »
One of the things I did while on Active Duty was serve on the Catapult Test Team on USS Theodore Roosevelt and USS George Washington.  The way we test a shipboard catapult is by using a series of carts called deadloads.  Each deadload has a different weight...from about 12,000 pounds all the way up to the heaviest at 110,000 pound.  They all run on heavy aircraft tires and are built out of heavy plate steel that provides floatation chambers.

A steam catapult's performance can be plotted on a curve, with deadload weight and catapult control setting yielding a predictable endspeed.  Each catapult is certified for aircraft operations dockside by firing a series of deadloads and launching them over the side and into the water, where they are recovered by tug, lifted, drained, serviced and sent back up to the flight deck for another shot.  You end up shooting each one several times at different Capacity Selector Valve (CSV) settings, and plotting the acceleration and endspeeds.  Fascinating stuff.

That 110,000 pound deadload is the motherlode.  We end up shooting it at the maximum setting on CSV, so the launch valves open completely in a second, and put the maximum amount of steam pressure for the longest period of time on the entire launching engine.  When you can throw 110,000 pounds of dead weight, no engine whatsoever, with all of the speed being generated by the cat, off the pointy end of the ship doing 150 MPH and landing almost a quarter mile off the bow, that is power that is simply unmatched by any other Navy in the world.

The aircraft the Chinee are using on their toy are no match for what we can throw into the air every 30 seconds during a launch cycle.  The steam catapults on a Nimitz class carrier are capable of ripping the nose wheel right off of an airplane.  They are also capable of putting an aircraft that is fully armed and fully fueled in the air, ready to kick ass immediately, not screw around swapping gas with other fighters.

 :smokin:

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Re: China Develops Specialized Aerial Refueling
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2014, 06:46:31 PM »
One of the things I did while on Active Duty was serve on the Catapult Test Team on USS Theodore Roosevelt and USS George Washington.  The way we test a shipboard catapult is by using a series of carts called deadloads.  Each deadload has a different weight...from about 12,000 pounds all the way up to the heaviest at 110,000 pound.  They all run on heavy aircraft tires and are built out of heavy plate steel that provides floatation chambers.

A steam catapult's performance can be plotted on a curve, with deadload weight and catapult control setting yielding a predictable endspeed.  Each catapult is certified for aircraft operations dockside by firing a series of deadloads and launching them over the side and into the water, where they are recovered by tug, lifted, drained, serviced and sent back up to the flight deck for another shot.  You end up shooting each one several times at different Capacity Selector Valve (CSV) settings, and plotting the acceleration and endspeeds.  Fascinating stuff.

That 110,000 pound deadload is the motherlode.  We end up shooting it at the maximum setting on CSV, so the launch valves open completely in a second, and put the maximum amount of steam pressure for the longest period of time on the entire launching engine.  When you can throw 110,000 pounds of dead weight, no engine whatsoever, with all of the speed being generated by the cat, off the pointy end of the ship doing 150 MPH and landing almost a quarter mile off the bow, that is power that is simply unmatched by any other Navy in the world.

The aircraft the Chinee are using on their toy are no match for what we can throw into the air every 30 seconds during a launch cycle.  The steam catapults on a Nimitz class carrier are capable of ripping the nose wheel right off of an airplane.  They are also capable of putting an aircraft that is fully armed and fully fueled in the air, ready to kick ass immediately, not screw around swapping gas with other fighters.

 :smokin:

Wait 10 or 15 years.


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