Author Topic: Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74  (Read 415 times)

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Offline Rapunzel

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Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74
« on: January 03, 2014, 09:01:44 PM »
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/posts/la-et-ms-phil-everly-of-the-everly-brothers-dies-at-74-20140103,0,2091176.story

Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74



The Everly Brothers -- Phil, left, and Don -- early in their career. (Rhino Records / January 3, 2014)

By Randy Lewis

January 3, 2014, 5:34 p.m.

Phil Everly, who with his brother, Don, made up the most revered vocal duo of the rock-music era, their exquisite harmonies profoundly influencing the Beatles, the Beach Boys, the Byrds and countless younger-generation rock, folk and country singers, died Friday in Burbank of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, his wife, Patti Everly, told The Times. He was 74.

“We are absolutely heartbroken,” she said, noting that the disease was the result of a lifetime of cigarette smoking. “He fought long and hard.”

During the height of their popularity in the late 1950s and early 1960s, they charted nearly three dozen hits on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, among them “Cathy’s Clown,” “Wake Up Little Suzie,” “Bye Bye Love,” “When Will I Be Loved” and “All I Have to Do Is Dream.” The Everly Brothers were among the first 10 performers inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame when it got off the ground in 1986.

"They had that sibling sound," said Linda Ronstadt, who scored one of the biggest hits of her career in 1975 with her recording of "When Will I Be Loved," which Phil Everly wrote. "The information of your DNA is carried in your voice, and you can get a sound [with family] that you never get with someone who’s not blood related to you. And they were both such good singers--they were one of the foundations, one of the cornerstones of the new rock 'n' roll sound."

Robert Santelli, executive director of the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles, said Friday, “When you talk about harmony singing in the popular music of the postwar period, the first place you start is the Everly Brothers.... You could say they were the vocal link between all the 1950s great doo wop groups and what would come in the 1960s with the Beach Boys and the Beatles. They showed the Beach Boys and the Beatles how to sing harmony and incorporate that into a pop music form that was irresistible.”

In addition to his wife, Everly is survived by his brother, Don, their mother, Margaret, sons Jason and Chris, and two granddaughters. Funeral services will be private.

A full obituary will appear in Saturday's Times.
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline Rapunzel

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Re: Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2014, 09:03:33 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3-E9JebDtU" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3-E9JebDtU</a>
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline Rapunzel

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Re: Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2014, 09:12:40 PM »
They performed at my high school in 1962 along with Duane Eddy and Sandy Nelson.
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Online truth_seeker

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Re: Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2014, 09:24:21 PM »
They performed at my high school in 1962 along with Duane Eddy and Sandy Nelson.
Then that answers the old question from Wolfman Jack:  "Where were you, in 62 ??

Offline DCPatriot

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Re: Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2014, 09:29:57 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4X7b2E_Jq-k" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4X7b2E_Jq-k</a>


IIRC, the Catholic Church Diocese in Western, New York was not at all happy with that song.....about two kids falling asleep at the drive-in.





« Last Edit: January 03, 2014, 09:34:49 PM by DCPatriot »
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Offline happyg

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Re: Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2014, 10:46:02 PM »
I loved those guys back then. The lyrics were so easy to learn, and the music was liked by all age groups. Mom and Dad used to sing along to their songs.

Offline PzLdr

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Re: Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2014, 08:39:50 AM »
Saw them every time they played the New York area from their Jones Beach reunion tour until they stopped touring. They are one of my top four, along with Dion, Buddy Holly and The Searchers. RIP, Phil. All you have to do is Dream.  :0001:
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Offline Rapunzel

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Re: Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2014, 02:40:38 PM »
Saw them every time they played the New York area from their Jones Beach reunion tour until they stopped touring. They are one of my top four, along with Dion, Buddy Holly and The Searchers. RIP, Phil. All you have to do is Dream.  :0001:

Buddy Holly is way up there for sure.  He was a brilliant musician and gone way too fast.
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline Rapunzel

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Re: Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2014, 06:20:07 PM »
http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2014/01/maybe-tomorrow.php

January 4, 2014 by Scott Johnson in Music
Maybe tomorrow

Phil Everly — the younger of the Everly Brothers — died yesterday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at the age of 74. The Associated Press obituary does not traffic in understatement: “There is no more beautiful sound than the voices of siblings swirled together in high harmony, and when Phil and Don Everly combined their voices with songs about yearning, angst and loss, it changed the world.”

Phil Everly’s death represents a profound loss to the Cosmic American Music in which the Everly Brothers by themselves formed a constellation. They brought the close harmony singing of traditional country music into the mainstream of American popular music. More than a few great musicians learned harmony singing by listening to their records. In his touring multimedia retrospective, Peter Asher recalls how he and Gordon Waller taught themselves harmony singing by imitating the Everly Brothers. Paul McCartney acknowledged his debt to the Everlys in “Let ‘Em In” and wrote “On the Wings of a Nightingale” for their first post-reunion recording in 1984.

After tearing through a succession of memorable pop songs written for them by Felice and Boudleaux Bryant at the end of the 1950′s, they struck out on their own with Warner Brothers in 1960. Some of their most brilliant work followed, including their 1960 Warner Brothers hit “Cathy’s Clown.” Even as their audience in the United States deserted them in the wake of the British Invasion, they continued deepening and updating their work on albums such as The Everly Brothers Sing and Roots.

Their British fans never really left them. After performing together with their faces a few inches apart from each other for 20 years, the brothers famously broke up in public onstage at Knott’s Berry Farm in Buena Park, California, in 1973. When they reunited ten years later, they repaid their debt to their British fans by debuting the reunion in a concert at the Royal Albert Hall. (Rhino Records has now released a two-disc recording of that concert.)

The video above captures Don and Phil in a beautiful performance of “Take a Message To Mary/Maybe Tomorrow” at the Christmas 1983 BBC concert following their reunion concert that fall. It’s a medley that goes back to their Cadence recordings of the 1950′s and brings their career full circle. “Take a Message to Mary” was written by the Bryants, “Maybe Tomorrow” by the Everlys.

We saw the Everly Brothers at the University of Minnesota when their reunion tour took them through Minneapolis in June 1984, and again in the fall of 2003 when Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel — two of their most diligent students — brought them to St. Paul as part of their own version of a reunion tour. Seeing them all together gave me the occasion to meditate on the emotional pull of the brothers’ close harmony singing in “The deep meaning of Simon and Garfunkel.” Brother Phil, RIP. (This post is adapted from my past tributes to the Everly Brothers here.)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RECqqc8S-fI" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RECqqc8S-fI</a>


“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline Rapunzel

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Re: Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers dies at 74
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2014, 09:17:15 PM »
http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/phil-everlys-son-jason-remembers-his-rock-pioneer-dad-exclusive-20140106

Phil Everly's Son Jason Remembers His Rock Pioneer Dad: Exclusive
'He was gracious, and ridiculously humble'


January 6, 2014 2:55 PM ET

On Friday night, the music world lost a giant with the death of the Everly Brothers' Phil Everly. Tributes have poured in over the last few days, and in this exclusive conversation, Rolling Stone's Patrick Doyle speaks with Phil Everly's son, Jason, about his father's legacy and the humble attitude he carried from his early years as a budding rock musician to one of his greatest joys in being a grandfather.

Remember Phil Everly with 12 essential Everly Brothers tracks

My father was a regular guy – the guy hanging down at the Home Depot or Walmart. In his older days, he was down at the local high school football game, hanging out with the local judge. He's just a big goof and one of the funniest individuals you'd ever meet. The real rock stars don't act like real rock stars.

When I was in grade school, kids were saying, "What's your dad do?" and I was like, "Oh, he's a singer," but nobody had ever heard of him, obviously. I didn't really understand what he did. When I was 10 or 11, they played the Philippines. We were way up in the nosebleeds. They were just two little guys onstage and even I had to go, "I'll be damned, is that dad? Is that what he does? I guess I didn't get it." To me, he was just the guy who shot hoops with me, played Horse, taught me how to sing and play guitar and spanked me when I didn't do my homework. He was the guy I didn't want to make mad. You know, the guy that sat there when it was thunder and lightning and would make up something so it wasn't scary.

He was gracious, and ridiculously humble. "I'm just a guy. I'm Phil. How are you?" The last big tour that they did, I was the brothers' agent for a while, and then my dad's agent after that. We'd come out and there'd be 200 people waiting to mob him. He was also a closet inventor. He was always trying to invent stuff. When I was a little kid in the Seventies, he wanted to make a guitar with a speaker in it. It was heavy and it didn't really work and had tons of feedback. He had a record player with two needles so it would play real stereo. That's what he was trying to invent: "What can we do? How can we make this better?"

They had Southern roots; My dad always said "gi-tar" instead of "guitar." They grew up really poor. And I think the most valuable thing they owned was my grandfather's guitar. Their album [1958's] Songs Our Daddy Taught Us is the quintessential Everly Brothers. That's how they grew up, singing these stories. They talked like that. My dad told me people were trying to stick them in the country mold, but they wanted to play 4-4, which they heard in the R&B clubs. So you take a little bit of country, these sort of Appalachian songs, some pop sensibilities, some of my uncle's good guitar work, and you've got yourself something different. There's some wonderful stuff going every direction.

Phil Everly's Life in Photos

In '55, '56, '57, rock & roll was getting its feet under it, but sticking those guitar riffs into "Wake Up Little Susie" and "Bye Bye Love," which came out in January of '57, was the final piece of the puzzle, in my opinion. My dad was 17 when they had their first hit.

My dad always said, "When we went to Nashville, we had about two weeks left of money before we had to go get real jobs, and that would have been it." And then they became world famous and wealthy and all the things that go with that. Everybody gets their own agent, their own lawyer, accountant and managers, and bad things happen. When you add in the professional side, you have room for gossip like crazy, from bandmembers or hangers-on. But at the end of the day, you've walked the same path, and so you know there's no one you love more. That's how they work. You can run into a lot of problems with that, but at the end of the day there's zero question they loved each other. Zero.

You couldn't get in between them. If you were going to say something bad about my uncle Don in front of my father, you were in for it. When Paul Simon asked to bring them on tour for the "Old Friends" tour, I said, "Paul, you know them. They're brothers. If they're getting along, then the answer is yes. If they're not getting along, then the answer is no." I can't tell you the amount of phone calls we had. Five years ago, the Grammys brought over, they had everybody – Little Richard and Chuck Berry – and they wanted the Everly Brothers badly. The guy was begging me. Everybody wanted them to go on tour again. But you can't tell guys that have helped invent rock & roll and toured the world for 50 years on every continent over and over again what to do.

See Where the Everly Brothers Rank on Our 100 Greatest Artists of All Time

I don't remember the last time the brothers actually saw each other. We finished the last tour in 2006 or so. I don't think they hung out that much. It's possible they had a meeting here or there in a mall in Nashville or something. There's always some business stuff to chat about, and their mom's still alive. Periodically, you know, birthdays, holidays, they would chat. Don would be like, "You look grayer now." "Ah, you too." The two of them were both blessed with some real good hair, by the way. It's been years since I've hung out with my Uncle Don. But on tour, it was fun seeing the other half of my dad, because they're so alike in so many ways – they have a similar sense of humor, just two Kentucky boys that did well.

I have two little girls who are six and nine, and all my dad really wanted to do is sit with a glass of wine and play with his grandkids. He was in his 70s, he's like, "I got nothing to prove. I'm totally at peace with my life." He was a smoker, like a lot of people from that generation, and he quit 10 years ago, but it still chased him down. But he said he had a lot of good cards: "I can't complain. I had a really good life." We have a little video studio and we've been recording my dad the last couple years. You know, stories, and he would sing old songs and talk about everybody. But he never told dirt on anybody.

My dad loved to come to his grandkids' soccer games. He'd watch me be the coach and scream and yell – "Oh you're one of those coaches." And I said, "When I played soccer, the refs threatened to throw you out because you were yelling so much." He goes, "That's true." He'd be there at every soccer game and screaming and yelling at everybody. He's just an awesome dad that just happened to be a rock star.
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776


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