Author Topic: Einstein, Gödel, and the Science of Time Travel  (Read 298 times)

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Online EC

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Einstein, Gödel, and the Science of Time Travel
« on: December 28, 2013, 06:32:04 PM »
4 minutes of fascination that cropped up on my twitter feed courtesy of Allysa Milano. She's a bit of a science nerd at heart.

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/07/19/thnkr-science-of-time-travel/

Quote
The fabric of time remains among the most fascinating frontiers of science, and the concept of time travel among the most prolific plot lines of science fiction. In this short video from THNKR, who also brought us the BOOKD series on paradigm-shifting books, theoretical physicist Ronald Mallett goes against the present scientific consensus and argues, by way of Einstein and Gödel’s theories, that time travel might, indeed, be possible. Whether in a century we’ll look back and laugh at the wild misguidedness of his proposition or at its blatant obviousness, only time will tell.


Video at link.
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Offline Chieftain

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Re: Einstein, Gödel, and the Science of Time Travel
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2013, 06:52:49 PM »
yah...I could make a video arguing that if my Auntie got a sex change that would make her my Uncle, and it would have the same veracity as this guy's arguments. 

Show me the math.



Online Oceander

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Re: Einstein, Gödel, and the Science of Time Travel
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2013, 09:45:18 PM »
yah...I could make a video arguing that if my Auntie got a sex change that would make her my Uncle, and it would have the same veracity as this guy's arguments. 

Show me the math.





For starters:

Ronald L. Mallett, The Gravitational Field of a Circulating Light Beam (2003).

Mallett is a professor of physics at the University of Connecticut, where he's been teaching since 1975.


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