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Offline Rapunzel

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« on: December 28, 2013, 04:40:52 PM »

Offline Chieftain

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« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2013, 05:02:35 PM »
I was reading recently that we have imaged the most distant and most brilliant object we have ever seen.  It is a Quasar some 1.3 billion light years away...right out at the very edge of "known space" but it is much further away than is apparent because it is also traveling away from us at 40% of the speed of light, and that distorts things in all kinds of ways.  The point is that the light we can see today via Hubble took over 1.3 billion years to get here...

In late 2012 researchers using Hubble, Kepler and other orbital instruments have been able to finally trace the development of the Crab Nebula all the way back to the year 1050 when Chinese astronomers recorded seeing a "guest star" that lasted two weeks and was visible during the day.  That "guest star" was the super nova explosion of the star that created the crab nebula, and created a super massive black hole in the center.  The existence of black holes was not even formally proposed until 1971, and the things we know now about these objects stagger the mind.  But the light those ancient Chinese first saw in 1050 was 2500 years old by the time it got here.

It amazed me that we are only just a century past the Wright Brothers, and I wonder where we will be in another century or three. 


Offline Oceander

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« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2013, 01:15:56 AM »
I was reading recently that we have imaged the most distant and most brilliant object we have ever seen.  It is a Quasar some 1.3 billion light years away...right out at the very edge of "known space" but it is much further away than is apparent because it is also traveling away from us at 40% of the speed of light, and that distorts things in all kinds of ways.  The point is that the light we can see today via Hubble took over 1.3 billion years to get here...

In late 2012 researchers using Hubble, Kepler and other orbital instruments have been able to finally trace the development of the Crab Nebula all the way back to the year 1050 when Chinese astronomers recorded seeing a "guest star" that lasted two weeks and was visible during the day.  That "guest star" was the super nova explosion of the star that created the crab nebula, and created a super massive black hole in the center.  The existence of black holes was not even formally proposed until 1971, and the things we know now about these objects stagger the mind.  But the light those ancient Chinese first saw in 1050 was 2500 years old by the time it got here.

It amazed me that we are only just a century past the Wright Brothers, and I wonder where we will be in another century or three. 



It is truly amazing.  I only wish I could still be around in another century or three to appreciate where we manage to get to.

Offline WAYNE

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« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2013, 07:05:34 AM »
 Awesome ..


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