Author Topic: Florida dad, teen son found dead in scuba diving accident testing out Christmas gifts  (Read 342 times)

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Offline flowers

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http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/12/27/florida-dad-teen-son-found-dead-in-scuba-diving-accident-testing-out-christmas/?intcmp=trending

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There's a sign near the pond's entrance alerting divers that the cave is dangerous and intended for advanced divers.

Spivey was an experienced diver but his son was not certified. Neither were experienced in cave diving.


ChemicalEngineer

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Diving in fresh water is extremely boring.  It is tediously monochromatic.  Lakes are as still as swimming pools and devoid of the interesting surge presented along the California coast.   The only thing caves add is rocky relief and danger, particularly at the depths indicated, viz. 67 and 127 feet.

Twin tanks might seem safer to the layman, but in reality multiply the danger. 
1.  There is increased risk of going too far, too deep, staying too long.
2.  There is increased risk of decompression sickness.  You can hardly get in trouble with a single 72 cu ft tank.
But with twins, it's much easier. 
3.  Going deeper presents the risk of nitrogen narcosis, or giddiness.  You get disoriented, confused.  It's like
vertigo, which I also experienced as a pilot when ground cover socked me in on takeoff/climbout.

He had no business doing this to his 15 year old son.   Both paid the price for dad's stupidity.

In hundreds of ocean dives, I never saw so much equipment on anybody as both of these guys have.  It presented a very false
sense of security and safety, as we now see.  Once in danger, you can easily dump your tank and free ascend from even 100 feet down.
They did not even do that.  Most divers who drown are still wearing their weight belt. They don't want to pay for a new one.

Offline Oceander

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That's a shame.

Offline sinkspur

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Diving in fresh water is extremely boring.  It is tediously monochromatic.  Lakes are as still as swimming pools and devoid of the interesting surge presented along the California coast.   The only thing caves add is rocky relief and danger, particularly at the depths indicated, viz. 67 and 127 feet.

Twin tanks might seem safer to the layman, but in reality multiply the danger. 
1.  There is increased risk of going too far, too deep, staying too long.
2.  There is increased risk of decompression sickness.  You can hardly get in trouble with a single 72 cu ft tank.
But with twins, it's much easier. 
3.  Going deeper presents the risk of nitrogen narcosis, or giddiness.  You get disoriented, confused.  It's like
vertigo, which I also experienced as a pilot when ground cover socked me in on takeoff/climbout.

He had no business doing this to his 15 year old son.   Both paid the price for dad's stupidity.

In hundreds of ocean dives, I never saw so much equipment on anybody as both of these guys have.  It presented a very false
sense of security and safety, as we now see.  Once in danger, you can easily dump your tank and free ascend from even 100 feet down.
They did not even do that.  Most divers who drown are still wearing their weight belt. They don't want to pay for a new one.

Wow.  Twins?  I've been diving for 30 years and never used twins.

Everything you said is correct.  A single tank, a BC, a regulator, a weight belt, and a mask is all any diver needs.  And cave diving is the most dangerous diving one can do.  Too easy to become disoriented and to panic, but with no way out.

I got caught in a current in Little Cayman and immediately dropped the weight belt and got to the top.  And that was at 40'.  Deep diving even for an advanced diver requires maximum focus and attention.  I rarely find anything below 60' worth seeing.
Roy Moore's "spiritual warfare" is driving past a junior high without stopping.


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