Author Topic: Common Core Standards: Throwing Gasoline on a Fire  (Read 390 times)

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Offline Rapunzel

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Common Core Standards: Throwing Gasoline on a Fire
« on: December 11, 2013, 11:19:59 PM »
http://patriotsbillboard.org/common-core-standards-throwing-gasoline-on-a-fire/

 Common Core Standards: Throwing Gasoline on a Fire


COMMOM CORE Is A Lot Like ”UN Agenda 21″ – Once You Find Out What’s Really In It, You Want To Throw It Out. Unlike Nancy Pelosi’s Obamacare Push: “We’ve Got To Pass It To Find Out What’s In It” – Well, They Passed It And Now We’re Finding Out What’s In It. Common Core, Agenda 21 Etc., Etc., Are Being Passed By Un-Informed Local Elected Officials. Educate Those That Don’t Know What’s In It. It’s Up To You!

Bruce Deitrick Price 12-5-13  Common Core was sold to the public as a way to improve public schools.  Arguably, it’s the opposite.

First of all, the people in charge have been in charge for 85 years.  They have proved themselves to be architects of mediocrity and decline, nothing else.

Second, Common Core locks in place bad ideas that have plagued us for decades.  Sight-words in reading, Reform Math curricula in arithmetic, Constructivism in the teaching of knowledge, and many other failed theories and methods beloved by left-wing professors.

Third, Common Core Standards give federal bureaucrats more power.  Communities will have less flexibility.  It’s everything a totalitarian government wants.

The essential flaw in Common Core was stated in 2010 by Gov. Tim Kaine of Virginia, a Democrat.  According to the Virginian-Pilot: “Kaine argued that the federal rules for standards were focused on ‘strategies and approaches, not content outcomes.’”  Precisely.  The so-called experts love tweaking theory, not making sure that children learn.

Sixty years ago, the Education Establishment smugly bragged, “We don’t teach history.  We teach children.”  That’s the switch Gov. Kaine is talking about.

For thousands of years, schools were concerned with one thing: teaching content.  John Dewey and the Education Establishment adopted the opposite approach.  Content is the unwanted guest at the funeral.  To hide the shift away from sound practice, public schools are adrift in a fog of propaganda and sophistry.

For example, Common Core contains one of the biggest flip-flops in the history of education.  A few years ago, teachers were told to teach each child differently.  Now the Common Core dogma says every teacher must teach the same things in the same way, across the country.

For a second example, Common Core is full of weird techniques.  One dictates that children must read more dull instructional texts, not literature.  But it’s stories that draw children into reading.  (Look at what adults read for fun.)

A third example is called Close Reading.  The idea is that children, many of whom can hardly read, will spend days rereading short, difficult passages.  This gimmick covers up the fact that many children cannot read easy passages fluently.

A new book, Credentialed to Destroy: How and Why Education Became a Weapon, by attorney Robin Eubanks, “details extensive evidence … that education became an invisible and purposeful means of restructuring the West, especially the US, away from individualism and capitalism towards a more collectivist orientation in the future. A goal that guides the actual Common Core implementation[.]”

The fraudulence of Common Core was revealed four years ago, when the corestandards.org website first appeared.

Consider students in second-grade arithmetic.  What would be a reasonable standard that everyone understands?  Try this: “Children can count to 100.  They can add and subtract two-digit numbers.”  Only 13 words.  Parents can quickly evaluate how their children are doing.  Perfect.

But here are actual Common Core Math Standards for second grade (read as much as you can stand):

In Grade 2, instructional time should focus on four critical areas: (1) extending understanding of base-ten notation; (2) building fluency with addition and subtraction; (3) using standard units of measure; and (4) describing and analyzing shapes.

1. Students extend their understanding of the base-ten system. This includes ideas of counting in fives, tens, and multiples of hundreds, tens, and ones, as well as number relationships involving these units, including comparing. Students understand multi-digit numbers (up to 1000) written in base-ten notation, recognizing that the digits in each place represent amounts of thousands, hundreds, tens, or ones (e.g., 853 is 8 hundreds + 5 tens + 3 ones).

2. Students use their understanding of addition to develop fluency with addition and subtraction within 100. They solve problems within 1000 by applying their understanding of models for addition and subtraction, and they develop, discuss, and use efficient, accurate, and generalizable methods to compute sums and differences of whole numbers in base-ten notation, using their understanding of place value and the properties of operations. They select and accurately apply methods that are appropriate for the context and the numbers involved to mentally calculate sums and differences for numbers with only tens or only hundreds.

3. Students recognize the need for standard units of measure (centimeter and inch) and they use rulers and other measurement tools with the understanding that linear measure involves an iteration of units. They recognize that the smaller the unit, the more iterations they need to cover a given length.

4. Students describe and analyze shapes by examining their sides and angles. Students investigate, describe, and reason about decomposing and combining shapes to make other shapes. Through building, drawing, and analyzing two- and three-dimensional shapes, students develop a foundation for understanding area, volume, congruence, similarity, and symmetry in later grades.

That’s only the “Introduction” for second grade.  There’s much more.  Is anyone impressed by such logorrhea?  What parent can declare, “Oh yes, my child can do that“?

It’s difficult to imagine an intelligent person reading this jargon and still supporting Common Core.  Rhetoric like this screams: “Welcome, suckers.”

Virtually all the Standards suffer from 1) murkiness, as in the verbiage above; or from 2) unreality, as in the sort of Standard that glibly announces that every child will be college-ready, career-ready, and a lifelong reader.  Most children will be none of the above.

Finally, what does all this blah-blah-blah accomplish?  It makes all previous textbooks obsolete.  Cha-ching!  Education as social engineering, education as cash cow.  Which is more offensive?  You don’t have to decide.  You have both on steroids.

Imagine the tedious, incoherent textbooks that will be based on those so-called Standards.  Imagine the tests that students will have to endure to show that they have unscrambled the scrambled.  Imagine all the teachers in the country going back to school to learn how to teach this malarkey.  Imagine the Department of Education coming after private schools and homeschoolers, forcing them to use this stuff.  Every bit of it, as seen in the long quote above, violates the first rule of education, which says: start with the simple, gain mastery, move gradually to the complex.  First, count to 10, then to 25.  Elementary school kids don’t need to know number theory or that numbers are base-10, which suggests base-8, etc.  Even to mention this is disruptive and sadistic.

Indeed, wallow all day in this recent headline: “Principals say Common Core tests make little kids vomit, pee their pants.” Sadists rule.

In short, Common Core is a Pandora’s box.  Not tested, not voted on by the community, all of it expensive and destructive.  Common Core is like ObamaCare: too much regulation, too much government power.

What do you get when you throw gasoline on a fire?  You get more fire, more smoke.  Less house.

And you get this: “One teacher reported that a student kept banging his head on the desk, and wrote, ‘This is too hard,’ and ‘I can’t do this,’ throughout his test booklet.”  Tell that kid to thank Obama and Arne Duncan.

QED: every state should withdraw from Common Core.

Bruce Deitrick Price analyzes educational theories and methods on his site Improve-Education.org.
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline Oceander

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Re: Common Core Standards: Throwing Gasoline on a Fire
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2013, 12:01:45 AM »
Quote
But here are actual Common Core Math Standards for second grade (read as much as you can stand):

In Grade 2, instructional time should focus on four critical areas: (1) extending understanding of base-ten notation; (2) building fluency with addition and subtraction; (3) using standard units of measure; and (4) describing and analyzing shapes.

1. Students extend their understanding of the base-ten system. This includes ideas of counting in fives, tens, and multiples of hundreds, tens, and ones, as well as number relationships involving these units, including comparing. Students understand multi-digit numbers (up to 1000) written in base-ten notation, recognizing that the digits in each place represent amounts of thousands, hundreds, tens, or ones (e.g., 853 is 8 hundreds + 5 tens + 3 ones).

2. Students use their understanding of addition to develop fluency with addition and subtraction within 100. They solve problems within 1000 by applying their understanding of models for addition and subtraction, and they develop, discuss, and use efficient, accurate, and generalizable methods to compute sums and differences of whole numbers in base-ten notation, using their understanding of place value and the properties of operations. They select and accurately apply methods that are appropriate for the context and the numbers involved to mentally calculate sums and differences for numbers with only tens or only hundreds.

3. Students recognize the need for standard units of measure (centimeter and inch) and they use rulers and other measurement tools with the understanding that linear measure involves an iteration of units. They recognize that the smaller the unit, the more iterations they need to cover a given length.

4. Students describe and analyze shapes by examining their sides and angles. Students investigate, describe, and reason about decomposing and combining shapes to make other shapes. Through building, drawing, and analyzing two- and three-dimensional shapes, students develop a foundation for understanding area, volume, congruence, similarity, and symmetry in later grades.

That’s only the “Introduction” for second grade.  There’s much more.  Is anyone impressed by such logorrhea?  What parent can declare, “Oh yes, my child can do that“?

It’s difficult to imagine an intelligent person reading this jargon and still supporting Common Core.  Rhetoric like this screams: “Welcome, suckers.”

Uhmm.  What's not to understand here?

(1) Students learn about counting in multiples - 5, 10, 15, 20, ... or 2, 4, 6, ... - and relationships between sets of multiples, including comparisons - such as 5 < 10, or 5+2 < 10+2 - and understand multi-digit numbers up to 1,000 - they can count from 1 to 1,000 (a good aspirational goal) - and learn things like the fact that 145 is the same as 100 + 40 + 5, which can make it easier to understand how to add two large numbers because adding 157 to 264 becomes a little easier when you think of it as 100 + 50 + 7 + 200 + 60 + 4.

Gawrsh, I can't see any real-world relevance to that (except for the fact that I can do medium level adding and subtracting in my head by using similar "tricks" such as the fact that adding 99 to something is the same as adding 100 and then subtracting 1:  138 + 99 is easier to do in your head if you think of it as 138 + 100 - 1).

(2) Basically, students learn how to use the mathematical operators: + and -, instead of just rote memorizing addition and subtraction tables.  For example, students are taught to take the rules that allow them to add 1 plus 3, 1 plus 1, and the like, and extend them to the problem of adding 31 plus 11 - in other words, to start thinking of the individual digits in each number instead of thinking of each number as some sort of indivisible thing.  I.e., the number 45 is not just a number - a unique mathematical entity - it is also a composite made of the numbers 40 and 5, and is written as a string of one-character elements, in this case the glyph '4' followed by the glyph '5'.  Am I using high falutin' language to describe the concepts?  Yes, but that's because I'm trying to speak to adults to explain what's going on; the teachers, however, aren't using phrases like "base-ten" with the kids in school.

(3) Students learn how to measure things, how to use rulers and how to do things like interpolate measurements when something is between two units of measurement.  That's controversial?  Students shouldn't learn how to use rulers, or to figure out what the difference between 1/8" and 3/16" is?

(4) Students start to learn about triangles and how their sides relate to each other, and how the angles relate to each other?  Students start to learn that a rectangle can be broken down into two triangles, or that two triangles can be put together to get a rectangle or square?  Students start to learn that there is a similarity between a triangle with sides of the length 3, 4, and 5 and a triangle with sides 6, 8, and 10, that doesn't exist between a triangle with sides 3, 4, and 5 and a triangle with sides 3, 7, and 11?  Students begin to learn that one figure, a rectangle, with sides 6 and 9, can also be described as a particular arrangement of squares, each with four sides of 1, and that this is also known as the rectangle's area?

I, as a parent, can definitely say that my daughter can do all of those things - in fact I'm very proud of the fact that she took quite readily to some of these things.

Sorry, but I just don't buy the anti-Common Core hype.  The Common Core standards do not require the importation of political agendas, and political agendas can be imported under any set of standards; what matters is the intent of the incorporator, not the set of standards under which the incorporator operates.  In fact, under a common set of standards it becomes harder, not easier, to covertly import a political agenda because the differences due to the effects of that political agenda can be more readily isolated and identified.

Offline Rapunzel

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Re: Common Core Standards: Throwing Gasoline on a Fire
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2013, 02:06:07 AM »
Uhmm.  What's not to understand here?


Sorry, but I just don't buy the anti-Common Core hype.  The Common Core standards do not require the importation of political agendas, and political agendas can be imported under any set of standards; what matters is the intent of the incorporator, not the set of standards under which the incorporator operates.  In fact, under a common set of standards it becomes harder, not easier, to covertly import a political agenda because the differences due to the effects of that political agenda can be more readily isolated and identified.


so you are okay with your daughter being indoctrinated like this????

http://news.investors.com/ibd-editorials/120913-682277-common-core-lesson-portrays-obama-as-messiah.htm?ven=rss&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

Common Core Lesson Teaches Children Obama Is A Messiah


 Posted 12/09/2013 07:13 PM ET

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Propaganda: A lesson plan for third-graders linked to a controversial federal education initiative makes sure America's next generation does not forget who is the one we have been waiting for.

During the Soul Train Awards in 2012, comedian and actor Jamie Foxx exhorted a wildly cheering crowd to "first of all (give) honor to god, and our lord and savior Barack Obama," exhibiting the all-too-widespread hero worship that casts rational thought aside and labels even legitimate criticism as virtual blasphemy.

The same cult of personality is creeping into lesson plans and reading materials being created under the guise of the platform for nationalized education known as Common Core. One new lesson teaches our children that Obama is indeed the messiah.

A language-arts lesson plan for third-, fourth- and fifth-graders has been developed around the book "Barack Obama: Son of Promise, Child of Hope," in which the author, Nikki Grimes, paints the 44th president as nothing short of a messianic figure. The description of the associated lesson plan by Sherece Bennett boasts that it is officially "aligned" with the Common Core State Standards Initiative, an attempt to standardize various K-12 curricula around the country that has drawn national opposition.

Like the faux Obama autobiography, "Dreams Of My Father," which we now know was likely written by Bill Ayers, convicted terrorist and champion of using education as a socialist social-engineering tool, this book designed for kids paints an airbrushed and quite fawning picture of the former Barry Soetoro.

"Before dawn each morning," the book says, "Barry rose — his mother's voice driving him from dream land. 'Time for learning English grammar and the Golden Rule. Be honest, be kind, be fair,' she taught him." It does not speak of who taught him the use of the teleprompter to lie about Benghazi, Fast and Furious, and ObamaCare, which has thrown stage-four cancer patients off their insurance.

The book notes Obama's struggle with his identity and uses it to slip in a biblical reference, one that would violate the left's definition of the separation of church and state. Late in the book, Obama dramatically changes his name from Barry to Barack.

"One morning, he slipped on the name he'd been born with. The name of his father, Barack. For the first time in his life, he wore it proudly — like a coat of many colors," the story goes, an obvious reference to Genesis 37:3, in which Joseph, the favorite son of Jacob, receives a "coat of many colors."

This book and lesson plan are together a long version of the "Mmm, mmm, mmm! Barack Hussein Obama!" chant sung by children at the B. Bernice Young Elementary School in Burlington Township, N.J., in February 2009 for a Black History Month presentation.

Children may be excused for what adults teach them, but adults such as Florida A&M professor Barbara A. Thompson, who wrote "The Gospel According to Apostle Barack: In Search of a More Perfect Political Union as 'Heaven Here on Earth,'" have no excuse

Neither does Newsweek, which in November 2010 declared in its cover headline that Obama was the "God of All Things." Behind the headline was an image of the president with six arms balancing on one leg. In each hand, he carries a different policy issue. The image is reminiscent of depictions of the Hindu deity, Shiva.

And of course we have the patron saint of sycophancy, Chris Matthews, who is not a journalist but plays one on MSNBC. Concerning Obama's election, he famously proclaimed:

"This is bigger than Kennedy. ... This is the New Testament," shortly before he told us about the thrill going up his leg.

Common Core is the Pied Piper of education, and we should all be careful of false prophets proclaiming the coming of a deity.
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline NavyCanDo

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Re: Common Core Standards: Throwing Gasoline on a Fire
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2013, 02:38:30 PM »
My son’s elementary is diving heavy into Spanish culture immersion beginning  this year. Even though Hispanics make up a very small percentage of the students and they speak English, ALL the signs in the school are now bilingual, and for the Pledge of Allegiance, they alternate between English and Spanish.  6th Grade Social studies are 100% focused on the Mayan, Inca, and Aztec empires, and Science is also tied in some way with those empires. Zero studies of World History, American history or Government.
A nation that turns away from prayer will ultimately find itself in desperate need of it. :Jonathan Cahn

Offline Rapunzel

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Re: Common Core Standards: Throwing Gasoline on a Fire
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2013, 02:58:49 PM »
My son’s elementary is diving heavy into Spanish culture immersion beginning  this year. Even though Hispanics make up a very small percentage of the students and they speak English, ALL the signs in the school are now bilingual, and for the Pledge of Allegiance, they alternate between English and Spanish.  6th Grade Social studies are 100% focused on the Mayan, Inca, and Aztec empires, and Science is also tied in some way with those empires. Zero studies of World History, American history or Government.


The shame is not studying American and  World history.  I remember studying the South Americans in 3rd grade... not sure why I remember that so clearly...
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776


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