Author Topic: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter  (Read 516 times)

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Offline Cincinnatus

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Vancouver, Canada, leads the way. The way to what I don't know but I am certain this is going to give Obama oodles of good ideas.

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It is a ubiquitous piece of equipment found in virtually every building, a requirement for entry, a necessity for exit.

For some, the humble round doorknob is unremarkable and utilitarian, a simple tool, a means to an end. For others, it is a piece of art, an object of beauty, an architecturally significant adornment on the welcoming portal to a building. For others, it is so synonymous with ordinariness that a “knob” is a pejorative word for being dull or stupid.

In Vancouver, the doorknob is heading into a setting sun. Its future has been date-marked, legislated out of existence in all future construction, a tip to society’s quest for universal design and the easier-to-use lever handle.

And as it goes in Vancouver, so will it go in B.C., Canada, and perhaps even the world.

Vancouver is the only city in Canada with its own building code, so the changes made here are often chased into the B.C. Building Code and Canada’s National Building Code, and then put into practice in cities and towns across Canada. Vancouver’s influence is wide. And as go the codes, so too goes the construction industry.

Remember the regular toilet? Try to find one. Low-flush is all there is to be had. The incandescent light bulb? Sorry, just energy-saving fluorescent or LED now in most stores.

The change has crept up on us silently and without fanfare. Look at any new condo building. Any new office door. Any door to a public washroom that doesn’t have pneumatic hinges and a push-pad. There they are, these silver, black or brass-coloured levers that can spring a door open with even a forearm when hands are filled.

And, as doorknobs go, so too will go those other ubiquitous knobs, the ones that turn on and off water faucets. For they too are being legislatively upgraded to levers more conducive to the arthritic, gnarled or weakened hands we earn with age.

In September, Vancouver council adopted new amendments to its building code, effective next March, that, among other things, will require lever handles on all doors and lever faucets in all new housing construction.

It is not like the doorknob will disappear entirely. Like many inventions, it will hold its own for a long, long time. There are, after all, a few people who still use typewriters instead of computers. Vancouver’s rule is not retroactive to existing homes. But over time, the effect will become magnified as housing is replaced.

Vancouver has already signalled how serious it was about this change. Last year, before the amendments were proposed, city maintenance workers quietly removed most of the Art Deco doorknobs from the public doors in the heritage-listed City Hall, which was built in 1936. Where once the public, politicians and bureaucrats alike grasped ornate brass knobs with a stylized face embossed with “VCH” — for Vancouver City Hall — they now find utilitarian gold-coloured levers.

Finnish architect Juhani Pallasmaa has described the door handle as “the handshake of a building.” If that is so, the doorknob has made a lot of introductions.


http://www.vancouversun.com/vancouver+humble+doorknob+likely+trendsetter/9173543/story.html

Nothing new in this:
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Last year, before the amendments were proposed, city maintenance workers quietly removed most of the Art Deco doorknobs from the public doors in the heritage-listed City Hall, which was built in 1936. Where once the public, politicians and bureaucrats alike grasped ornate brass knobs with a stylized face embossed with “VCH” — for Vancouver City Hall — they now find utilitarian gold-coloured levers.
Wherever it lays its dead hand collectivism destroys beauty, even life itself.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2013, 08:41:05 PM by Cincinnatus »
We shall never be abandoned by Heaven while we act worthy of its aid ~~ Samuel Adams

Offline kevindavis

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2013, 09:11:05 PM »
Is this for real???
GOP House members came to Paul Ryan to be Speaker. He didn't come to them. And he was everybody's conservative darling back in 2012. So unless 1 of the remaining 240 wants to step up & do a better job in budgeting & negotiations & herding the party cats, then everybody please STFU. You go to battle with the army you have, not the one you want but don't have.

Kevin Davis

With Malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds.

Abraham Lincoln

Offline truth_seeker

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2013, 09:19:20 PM »
Over 40 years ago, levers were widely used across Europe. I remodeled a house in the mid 80s here, and used levers.

More functional. Used to meet ADA requirements. Widely found in office buildings today in America.

So Vancouver is hardly leading the world, Canada, North America anywhere they weren't already headed.
"God must love the common man, he made so many of them.”

Abe Lincoln

Offline Cincinnatus

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2013, 09:28:45 PM »
More functional. Used to meet ADA requirements. Widely found in office buildings today in America.

So Vancouver is hardly leading the world, Canada, North America anywhere they weren't already headed.


But Truth_Seeker what if I don't want levers and find knobs aesthetically more pleasing? Must I be required to have them, perhaps as an addendum to ObamaCare? Toilets government chooses. Light bulbs government chooses. Now door latches government chooses? Are we to infantile to make any of our own decisions?
We shall never be abandoned by Heaven while we act worthy of its aid ~~ Samuel Adams

Offline aligncare

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2013, 09:31:12 PM »
When I built my house I put in levers instead of knobs. If your hands are full you can open a door with your elbow. Perfect for the busy lifestyle.
NeverTrump wants to deny you YOUR voice, YOUR presidential choice.

Offline Cincinnatus

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2013, 09:34:03 PM »
When I built my house I put in levers instead of knobs

And I would assume you were allowed to choose whether to install levers instead of knobs, right? That is the real issue here. Who gets to choose? The individual consumer or the government?
We shall never be abandoned by Heaven while we act worthy of its aid ~~ Samuel Adams

Offline aligncare

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2013, 09:36:13 PM »
I'm with you Cincinnatus. I hate the building department. They wouldn't let me do the things that I wanted to do when I built my house. Often without any good reason except "it's against code."
« Last Edit: November 20, 2013, 09:37:21 PM by aligncare »
NeverTrump wants to deny you YOUR voice, YOUR presidential choice.

Offline truth_seeker

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2013, 09:47:43 PM »
More functional. Used to meet ADA requirements. Widely found in office buildings today in America.

So Vancouver is hardly leading the world, Canada, North America anywhere they weren't already headed.


But Truth_Seeker what if I don't want levers and find knobs aesthetically more pleasing? Must I be required to have them, perhaps as an addendum to ObamaCare? Toilets government chooses. Light bulbs government chooses. Now door latches government chooses? Are we to infantile to make any of our own decisions?
I didn't say I favored them to be imposed on others, in their homes.

I do support use in public places, for they are more functional. I had a friend that was a quad-with limited use of his hands. Not sure if he could turn a doorknob, unassisted.

You do know about "ADA," right?  And more is done in local, civil regulations aimed at public safety. Strapping is required on hot water heaters, against earthquakes. Venting is required on water heaters.

Carbon Monoxide alarms, are replacing smoke alarms. Stair treads must be wide enough, and handrails installed against falls. Unreinforced brick buildings were required to be retrofitted against earthquake damage and dangers. GFCIs reduce electrical appliance accident risks.

Sure some of this type thing is excessive. My father was a home builder, and was often very upset with local authorities.

I get both sides. I have been in both commercial and residential real estate for a quarter century. Owner costs weigh against personal safety, and financial/legal liability.

Anybody owning property where others live or work should be up to speed on these topics.   

 
"God must love the common man, he made so many of them.”

Abe Lincoln

Offline Cincinnatus

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2013, 10:15:11 PM »
You do know about "ADA," right?

I am well aware of ADA regulations but they do not equate with safety requirements.

I take a Libertarian approach to issues like ramps, levers instead of door knobs, and whatever. If the building is public add these things, but is it necessary for levers to be on every door? There may be one, perhaps two, wheelchair ramps, but I am not sure every entrance requires them; nor if that would be a good idea. Make a public building accessible to all, that would be fair. But also show some common sense.

When it comes to private property, any private property, it should be up to the owner. If he wishes to forgo the income that might be derived from the handicapped and their supporters, that's his choice and his loss. The government should have no role in telling an individual whether to use door knobs or levers but that is precisely what the Vancouver busy bodies are doing.
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In Vancouver, the doorknob is heading into a setting sun. Its future has been date-marked, legislated out of existence in all future construction, a tip to society’s quest for universal design and the easier-to-use lever handle.

Levers may be grand, but freedom is grander.
We shall never be abandoned by Heaven while we act worthy of its aid ~~ Samuel Adams

Offline Chieftain

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2013, 10:21:49 PM »
Is this for real???

Welcome to Canuckistan...


Offline truth_seeker

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2013, 10:39:59 PM »
Like it or not, "private property" offered for use to others, renting apartments or rooms, renting retail or offices, or even to restaurant customers, fall into "public" uses. This is true, even if it goes against one's political philosophy.

I suppose it depends on one's perspective. The quad fellow I mentioned before, went all out to get public places accessible. He loved sports, and wanted to go to stadiums with ease. He wasn't angry or disagreeable about it. Just felt it should be done.

It comes down to strict libertarian philosophy on the one hand, and living in the world as it actually is, on the other hand.

In my business I have to give way to my clients' wishes and positions. If a buyer takes a hard line requesting many safety repairs, I need to try to get that for them.

If a seller of mine draws the line, and will do few or no repairs, I need to support that position as well.

Rarely do any of them even want to get into the political philosophy like we do here.
"God must love the common man, he made so many of them.”

Abe Lincoln

Offline aligncare

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2013, 08:44:31 AM »
You do know about "ADA," right?

I am well aware of ADA regulations ....

I take a Libertarian approach to issues like ramps, ...

There may be one, perhaps two, wheelchair ramps, but I am not sure every entrance requires them; nor if that would be a good idea. Make a public building accessible to all, that would be fair. But also show some common sense.

Levers may be grand, but freedom is grander.

If I may add to your point.

Every public street corner must have a ramp. Park "2 inches" into that ramp and you will get a hefty ticket. Nevermind that a wheelchair bound individual may, and probably, will, never use that ramp. I repeat, NEVER, will that ramp be used by a wheelchair., you will get a ticket. Letter of the law? Spirit of the law? Loss of freedom? Commonsense?
NeverTrump wants to deny you YOUR voice, YOUR presidential choice.

Online Fishrrman

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Re: Vancouver’s ban on the humble doorknob likely to be a trendsetter
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2013, 09:47:11 PM »
[[ Make a public building accessible to all, that would be fair. But also show some common sense. ]]

With increasing frequency, ALMOST ALL public laws (by their very nature and in many cases by intentional design) show absolutely no correlation with the concept of "common sense".

Where's Tom Paine when you need him?


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