Author Topic: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford  (Read 1253 times)

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Offline Cincinnatus

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2013, 11:56:27 PM »
You cant ignore this place. it contains the two thirds of the nation's nuclear waste and the waste is threatening  the Colombia River with plutonium waste.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2013, 11:57:34 PM by SPQR »

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2013, 12:10:49 AM »
You cant ignore this place. it contains the two thirds of the nation's nuclear waste and the waste is threatening  the Colombia River with plutonium waste.

Another good place would be Bikini Atoll. People are rarely allowed on the island.

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2013, 12:16:06 AM »
Then there's the Chernyobl exclusion zone, which has become a world-class haven for wildlife - wildlife that shows nary any signs of injury from the elevated levels of radiation there, in flat contradiction to received wisdom regarding the effects of radiation.

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2013, 12:20:17 AM »
Then there's the Chernyobl exclusion zone, which has become a world-class haven for wildlife - wildlife that shows nary any signs of injury from the elevated levels of radiation there, in flat contradiction to received wisdom regarding the effects of radiation.

Don't forget the testing sites in Semipalatinsk and Novaya Zemlya in Russia
« Last Edit: November 08, 2013, 12:23:08 AM by SPQR »

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2013, 12:25:45 AM »
Don't forget the testing sites in Semipalatinsk and Novaya Zemlya in Russia

Shit happens, don't it?  Radiation isn't a particularly bigger threat than any other serious industrial risk; non-radioactive materials have killed far greater numbers than has radiation.  To mention just one:  Bhopal.

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2013, 12:36:59 AM »
Shit happens, don't it?  Radiation isn't a particularly bigger threat than any other serious industrial risk; non-radioactive materials have killed far greater numbers than has radiation.  To mention just one:  Bhopal.

You still have to take precautions.You can find radioactive products everywhere. I remember in my brothers lab that they used radioactive isotopes. It was kept in a special red container with the radiation sign.You can find low grade radioactive materials in X-Ray machines at doctors and dentists offices and hospitals. Its just the majority of people do not know why the dentist makes you wear that lead apron. It prevents you from being exposed to radiation

This is the proper way to dispose of hospital radioactive waste:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3068798/
« Last Edit: November 08, 2013, 12:47:47 AM by SPQR »

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2013, 12:49:57 AM »
You still have to take precautions.You can find radioactive products everywhere. I remember in my brothers lab that they used radioactive isotopes. It was kept in a special red container with the radiation sign.You can find low grade radioactive materials in X-Ray machines at doctors and dentists offices and hospitals. Its just the majority of people do not know why the dentist makes you wear that lead apron. It prevents you from being exposed to radiation

Actually, the radiation - the "x rays" - in the dentist's x-ray machine is generated with non-radioactive materials.  X-rays, which are themselves "radiation" in the sense that they can cause radiation injuries the way that gamma rays from radioactive materials can, are generated when a stream of electrons with a very high velocity is generated at the cathode end of a vacuum tube and then strikes the anode end.  Most of the energy of those electrons is turned into heat, but a small percentage of that energy is released as very high energy photons - which are the x-rays.

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2013, 01:14:04 AM »
Actually, the radiation - the "x rays" - in the dentist's x-ray machine is generated with non-radioactive materials.  X-rays, which are themselves "radiation" in the sense that they can cause radiation injuries the way that gamma rays from radioactive materials can, are generated when a stream of electrons with a very high velocity is generated at the cathode end of a vacuum tube and then strikes the anode end.  Most of the energy of those electrons is turned into heat, but a small percentage of that energy is released as very high energy photons - which are the x-rays.

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X-radiation (composed of X-rays) is a form of electromagnetic radiation. in medical diagnostic applications, the low energy (soft) X-rays are unwanted, since they are totally absorbed by the body, increasing the radiation dose without contributing to the image. Hence, a thin metal sheet, often of aluminium, called an X-ray filter, is usually placed over the window of the X-ray tube, absorbing the low energy part in the spectrum. This is called hardening the beam since it shifts the center of the spectrum towards higher energy (or harder) x-rays.A radiograph is an X-ray image obtained by placing a part of the patient in front of an X-ray detector and then illuminating it with a short X-ray pulse. Bones contain much calcium, which due to its relatively high atomic number absorbs x-rays efficiently. This reduces the amount of X-rays reaching the detector in the shadow of the bones, making them clearly visible on the radiograph. The lungs and trapped gas also show up clearly because of lower absorption compared to tissue, while differences between tissue types are harder to see.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090303125809.htm
« Last Edit: November 08, 2013, 01:17:22 AM by SPQR »

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2013, 01:19:49 AM »
.
X-radiation (composed of X-rays) is a form of electromagnetic radiation. in medical diagnostic applications, the low energy (soft) X-rays are unwanted, since they are totally absorbed by the body, increasing the radiation dose without contributing to the image. Hence, a thin metal sheet, often of aluminium, called an X-ray filter, is usually placed over the window of the X-ray tube, absorbing the low energy part in the spectrum. This is called hardening the beam since it shifts the center of the spectrum towards higher energy (or harder) x-rays.A radiograph is an X-ray image obtained by placing a part of the patient in front of an X-ray detector and then illuminating it with a short X-ray pulse. Bones contain much calcium, which due to its relatively high atomic number absorbs x-rays efficiently. This reduces the amount of X-rays reaching the detector in the shadow of the bones, making them clearly visible on the radiograph. The lungs and trapped gas also show up clearly because of lower absorption compared to tissue, while differences between tissue types are harder to see.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090303125809.htm

Yes, but that also demonstrates that radioactive materials are not used in the production of x-rays, notwithstanding that the end-result - the x-rays - consists of ionizing radiation.  Turn the x-ray machine off and there is no radiation.

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2013, 01:28:53 AM »
Yes, but that also demonstrates that radioactive materials are not used in the production of x-rays, notwithstanding that the end-result - the x-rays - consists of ionizing radiation.  Turn the x-ray machine off and there is no radiation.


Two radiocontrast agents are presently in common use. Barium sulfate (BaSO4) is given orally or rectally for evaluation of the GI tract. Iodine, in multiple proprietary forms, is given by oral, rectal, intra-arterial or intravenous routes. These radiocontrast agents strongly absorb or scatter X-rays, and in conjunction with the real-time imaging, allow demonstration of dynamic processes

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluoroscopy
« Last Edit: November 08, 2013, 01:31:59 AM by SPQR »

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2013, 01:31:35 AM »

Two radiocontrast agents are presently in common use. Barium sulfate (BaSO4) is given orally or rectally for evaluation of the GI tract. Iodine, in multiple proprietary forms, is given by oral, rectal, intra-arterial or intravenous routes. These radiocontrast agents strongly absorb or scatter X-rays, and in conjunction with the real-time imaging, allow demonstration of dynamic processes


How many of those are used by dentists?

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Re: International visitors study new field of nuclear forensics at Hanford
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2013, 02:02:39 AM »



Dental Radiographs are commonly called x-rays. Dentists use radiographs for many reasons: to find hidden dental structures, malignant or benign masses, bone loss, and cavities.A radiographic image is formed by a controlled burst of X-ray radiation which penetrates oral structures at different levels, depending on varying anatomical densities, before striking the film or sensor. Teeth appear lighter because less radiation penetrates them to reach the film. Dental caries, infections and other changes in the bone density, and the periodontal ligament, appear darker because X-rays readily penetrate these less dense structures. Dental restorations (fillings, crowns) may appear lighter or darker, depending on the density of the material.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_radiography
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_radiography
http://quizlet.com/17980137/chapter-3-the-dental-x-ray-machine-components-functions-flash-cards/#

When entering an DOE site, they give you a dosimeter or an film badge to check how much radiation are you receiving.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2013, 02:07:45 AM by SPQR »


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