Author Topic: An Obama voter's cry of despair  (Read 294 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online mystery-ak

  • Owner
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 248,409
An Obama voter's cry of despair
« on: November 02, 2013, 09:11:23 AM »
http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/01/opinion/morris-obama-voter-despair/index.html?hpt=hp_t4

An Obama voter's cry of despair
By Nathaniel P. Morris, Special to CNN
updated 11:14 AM EDT, Fri November 1, 2013

Editor's note: Nathaniel P. Morris is a second-year student at Harvard Medical School.

(CNN) -- I'm reading a terribly sad book these days. It's a book that I thought would uplift me during the doldrums of second-year medical school, and renew in me a sense of hope. It's called "The Audacity to Win," and it's a memoir of Barack Obama's 2008 presidential campaign.

When I'm finished with my patient write-ups at night and get into bed, the book returns me to a time when politics inspired millions and speeches could take your breath away. The election turned out to be a landslide, and news anchors paused to reflect on the historic nature of the hour.

My classmates cried with joy, and my parents saved every newspaper they could find. A young team of visionaries was headed for the White House, and the nation was ready for change. During Obama's transition to office in 2008, he had an 82% approval rating. There was something in the air.


And then I close the book. Cutting to the present is a rude awakening, like snapping out of a dream. It's hard to remember those days of optimism -- they seem a distant memory, a sad reminder of opportunities gone by. Change indeed happened, in the years since I cast my first ballot. It was simply nothing I could have imagined.

I credit Obama with great and varied accomplishments, from the passage of the Affordable Care Act to our military exit from Iraq, the end of "don't ask don't tell," to the killing of Osama bin Laden. Moreover, I believe that partisan obstructionism has upended too many efforts to push our nation forward: immigration reform, a public option for health care, and closing the base at Guantanamo Bay, among others. But, after the countless times in which I have found myself defending the Obama administration to colleagues and peers, I've reached a limit to the explanations that I can provide. I've reached a point of political despair.

Republican obstructionism cannot explain allowing the bugging of foreign leaders, nor having drones strike innocent children overseas. It cannot explain having the National Security Agency collect data on the private lives of Americans, nor prosecuting whistle-blowers who reveal government wrongdoing. It cannot account for assassinating Anwar al-Awlaki, an American citizen, without a trial, nor shirking public funding and spending limits during presidential campaigns.

It cannot justify the findings of a report that says the White House's efforts to silence the media are the "most aggressive ... since the Nixon Administration".

And, most recently, it cannot excuse the failure to design a simple website more than three years since the Affordable Care Act was signed into law.

I don't know if this is what I should have expected. If, at 18 years old, I was supposed to figure out that governance may contradict the political campaigns that precede it. Obviously, elective office isn't a predictable course, as the opposing political party and random events, such as the Newtown massacre, will shape our public conversation. Yet, of all of the examples that I have listed above, they largely seem to be of the administration's own choosing. That is what troubles me most of all.

I voted for Obama again in 2012, but not because I was excited by his candidacy. Mitt Romney presented a confusing and unrefined alternative who could not seem to lock down his policies or his positions. I felt that a second term for Obama, free from the pressures of future elections, would fulfill the hope that we had heard of for so long.

Still, as Obama's approval rating sank below 45% this week, returning to 2008 through that book has become that much harder. It makes me yearn for the many promises that disappeared.

This week I was reading the portion of the book describing how Obama suffered a huge loss to Clinton in the Pennsylvania primary. At a post-mortem campaign meeting, he told his staff that they needed to get back on track and stay true to the purpose of their cause. " 'I want us to get our mojo back,' he said. 'We've got to remember who we are.' "

It's five years later, Mr. President, and I couldn't agree with you more.

Support the USO

Online Lando Lincoln

  • Member
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 11,549
Re: An Obama voter's cry of despair
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2013, 09:24:09 AM »
Not once did Mr. Morris concede that perhaps his own worldview is flawed. 
For the progressive, there is very little to love about the United States. Washington, Jefferson, Madison? A bunch of rotten slaveholders, hypocrites, and cowards even when their hearts were in the right places. The Declaration of Independence? A manifesto for the propertied classes. The Constitution? An artifact of sexism and white supremacy. The sacrifices in the great wars of the 20th century? Feeding the poor and the disenfranchised into the meat-grinder of imperialism. The gifts of Carnegie, Rockefeller, Vanderbilt, Morgan, Astor? Blood money from self-aggrandizing robber barons. Nat Rev

Offline musiclady

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 15,207
Re: An Obama voter's cry of despair
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2013, 09:52:41 AM »
Oh, Obama does remember 'who he is.'

It's just that stupid kids like Morris were clueless and built their dreams on a hoax.

I don't feel sorry for him.

He should have done his homework.
Character still matters.  It always matters.

May 3, 2016 - the day the Republican party left ME.  I am now without a Party, and quite possibly without a country.  May God have mercy!

Offline musiclady

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 15,207
Re: An Obama voter's cry of despair
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2013, 09:53:35 AM »
Not once did Mr. Morris concede that perhaps his own worldview is flawed.

And most likely won't ever do that.

Brainwashing is a difficult thing to erase.
Character still matters.  It always matters.

May 3, 2016 - the day the Republican party left ME.  I am now without a Party, and quite possibly without a country.  May God have mercy!

Offline PzLdr

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3,421
Re: An Obama voter's cry of despair
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2013, 10:03:40 AM »
Old coffee commercial: "You get what you pay for". The author, his family, his choolmates all voted for the Trickster in Chief. To all of them, I say, "Choke on it". The 'mojo' is gone.  :smokin: 
Hillary's Self-announced Qualifications: She Stood Up To Putin...She Sits to Pee


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf