Author Topic: Ayn Rand's View of the American People. (1947)  (Read 511 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline AbaraXas

  • Just a nobody
  • Social Media Advisor
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 10,094
  • Just a nobody
Ayn Rand's View of the American People. (1947)
« on: October 27, 2013, 01:48:15 PM »
Sad how it is almost a complete inversion of this.

Quote
     There have never been any “masses” in America: the poorest American is an individual and, subconsciously, an individualist. Marxism, which has conquered our universities, is a dismal failure as far as the people are concerned: Americans cannot be sold on any sort of class war; American workers do not see themselves as a “proletariat,” but are among the proudest of property owners. It is professors and businessmen who advocate cooperation with Soviet Russia—American labor unions do not.

    America is the land of the uncommon man. It is the land where man is free to develop his genius—and to get its just rewards. It is the land where each man tries to develop whatever quality he may possess and to rise to whatever degree he can, great or modest. It is not the land where one glories or is taught to glory in one’s mediocrity. No self-respecting man in America is or thinks of himself as “little,” no matter how poor he may be. That, precisely, is the difference between an American working man and a European serf.

- Ayn Rand “Screen Guide for Americans,”
Plain Talk, Nov. 1947
Never delude yourself into thinking you're "influencing" or making a difference on the internet. It is an ephemeral pleasure.

Offline truth_seeker

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 16,412
  • Common Sense Results Oriented Conservative Veteran
Re: Ayn Rand's View of the American People. (1947)
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2013, 02:07:11 PM »
She sounds like an old school, economic and personal freedom conservative. I like.

Offline Rapunzel

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 71,719
Re: Ayn Rand's View of the American People. (1947)
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2013, 02:09:40 PM »
I find a lot of truth in this, AB.  Unfortunate that it is changing.. the prolotariate is winning.  The more highly educated we become the more Europeanized we become.
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776

Offline AbaraXas

  • Just a nobody
  • Social Media Advisor
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 10,094
  • Just a nobody
Re: Ayn Rand's View of the American People. (1947)
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2013, 02:33:51 PM »
I find a lot of truth in this, AB.  Unfortunate that it is changing.. the prolotariate is winning.  The more highly educated we become the more Europeanized we become.

I see what we have now is a complete inversion of what she said. One of the things I always hated about Pat Buchanan and those like him in describing the US is being a 'Eurocentric' culture. We aren't. We are very unique and the foundation of our culture was to throw off much of European culture.
Never delude yourself into thinking you're "influencing" or making a difference on the internet. It is an ephemeral pleasure.

Offline Rapunzel

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 71,719
Re: Ayn Rand's View of the American People. (1947)
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2013, 03:03:34 PM »
I see what we have now is a complete inversion of what she said. One of the things I always hated about Pat Buchanan and those like him in describing the US is being a 'Eurocentric' culture. We aren't. We are very unique and the foundation of our culture was to throw off much of European culture.

Exactly... want to see the differences read what EC asks us...with all due respect to EC... but we are a curiosity to Europeans who are so used to a Socialist society.. They really don't understand why most of us cheered John Wayne or RR... but that is what makes us different.... or "did"
“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves.” G Washington July 2, 1776


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf