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famousdayandyear

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« on: September 18, 2013, 07:34:51 PM »

Offline happyg

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« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2013, 10:51:47 AM »
I paid around $600 for my washer and dryer 15 years ago. Nothing has gone wrong with either. Even if something were to happen to it, I could probably fix it myself. It's the same way with cars, most of us could repair the old cars that had carburetors and basic engines. Now, I have no clue, so the garages makes big bucks!

Offline mountaineer

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« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2013, 08:45:08 PM »
I paid around $600 for my washer and dryer 15 years ago. Nothing has gone wrong with either. Even if something were to happen to it, I could probably fix it myself. It's the same way with cars, most of us could repair the old cars that had carburetors and basic engines. Now, I have no clue, so the garages makes big bucks!
Amen. I had a 1971 Plymouth Duster in college that was a snap to maintain. I changed the oil, lightbulbs and all the filters myself. There were no fancy electronics, no computers, just a huge trunk, big bench seats and 22 mpg.

Wow, do I wish I had that car!
A day without sunshine is like, you know, night.

Offline happyg

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« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2013, 08:53:56 PM »
Amen. I had a 1971 Plymouth Duster in college that was a snap to maintain. I changed the oil, lightbulbs and all the filters myself. There were no fancy electronics, no computers, just a huge trunk, big bench seats and 22 mpg.

Wow, do I wish I had that car!

I remember the Dusters. Lots of good cars back then. I had a 67 Ford Thunderbird who I gave to my grandson. He couldn't get it started, so I took the breather off, poured a tad of gas in carburetor, held the fly open with a screwdriver, and the car started right up. I told him to run the H out of it on Interstate to burn off the carbon, and he came back with a huge smile on his face. 

Offline Oceander

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« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2013, 09:38:54 PM »
Amen. I had a 1971 Plymouth Duster in college that was a snap to maintain. I changed the oil, lightbulbs and all the filters myself. There were no fancy electronics, no computers, just a huge trunk, big bench seats and 22 mpg.

Wow, do I wish I had that car!

I had the coupe version, the Plymouth Scamp, when I was in high school.  Had the 225 cid slant six; now that was a hard-to-kill engine.  The only thing I would definitely not want to deal with anymore on that car are the points.  The distributor was on the underside of the slant, right up against the wheel well; if you weren't really careful the screw holding the points in could drop down into the distributor.

That being said, new cars are qualitatively better than the old cars in many ways.  For one thing, the engines are both substantially more efficient and much more durable than the older engines.  Old odometers only went to 99,999 because it was uncommon for an engine to get that many miles before it had to be replaced/rebuilt.  Now odometers all have 6 digits - up to 999,999 - because it's routine for engines to get well over 100,000 miles.

Of course, that improvement does come with a price:  the electronics have now become blackboxes that can't be read unless one has diagnostic tools that can easily cost more than $1,000.  Being able to read the diagnostics from the engine's computers is very important, as is the ability to clear those logs, as I learned this past week-end when my neighbor, who is a mechanic, fixed a bad miss on my engine by clearing the diagnostic error logs and revving the engine enough to reset the sensor.  I would never have found that in a month of Sundays on this car - a 1999 Grand Marquis - but I probably could have fixed it over the weekend on my old 1971 Plymouth Scamp.

Offline Atomic Cow

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« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2013, 09:40:59 PM »
I had to pay almost $850 for a washer that was comparable to my 15 year old one after it literally flew apart and was just not economically fixable.  The cheaper washers don't clean worth crap.  Most use a spray or mist of water to rinse instead of actually filling the drum with water.
"...And these atomic bombs which science burst upon the world that night were strange, even to the men who used them."  H. G. Wells, The World Set Free, 1914

"The one pervading evil of democracy is the tyranny of the majority, or rather of that party, not always the majority, that succeeds, by force or fraud, in carrying elections." -Lord Acton

Offline happyg

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« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2013, 09:43:21 PM »
I have a 2011 Focus SEL. Love it. I took it in for a 3000 mile oil change, and the book said I only needed to do it every 5000 miles. That's a little savings. LOL!

Offline mountaineer

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« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2013, 08:19:06 AM »
I have a 2011 Focus SEL. Love it. I took it in for a 3000 mile oil change, and the book said I only needed to do it every 5000 miles. That's a little savings. LOL!
We have a 2014 Subaru, and oil changes are recommended every 7,500 miles, so that's a good thing.
A day without sunshine is like, you know, night.


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