Author Topic: Mysterious Sliding Rocks in Death Valley  (Read 833 times)

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Offline Cincinnatus

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Mysterious Sliding Rocks in Death Valley
« on: August 10, 2013, 05:52:12 PM »
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The 'sliding rocks' refer to a geological phenomenon where rocks move and inscribe long tracks along a smooth valley floor without human or animal intervention. 

Tracks from these sliding rocks have been observed and studied in various locations, but most notably in Death Valley National Park, California.  The tracks left behind from the stones have been studied since the early 1900s, yet the origins of stone movement are not confirmed and remain the subject of research.

In 2009, cameras were aimed at capturing various stages of the sliding rocks.  The developers of the photographic technology describe how difficult it is in capturing the stealthy rocks, since movements only occur about once every three years and last approximately ten seconds.

If you can figure this one out, the rest of the scientific community would love to hear it.

What are your theories?

Go to the link to see pictures of this phenomenon or to post your theory.

http://www.allproudamericans.com/Mysterious-Sliding-Rocks-in-Death-Valley.html
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Offline flowers

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Re: Mysterious Sliding Rocks in Death Valley
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2013, 05:56:46 PM »
The first time I ever heard of these rocks was about a year ago. We watched a special on TV about them. Wild.


Offline Rapunzel

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Re: Mysterious Sliding Rocks in Death Valley
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2013, 10:50:35 PM »
I've been watching the History Channel - How the Earth Formed - series.  I recommend it to everyone... anyway, two weeks ago they did the sliding rocks. A NPS official keeps track of their movement with GPS. The theory is because the ground is so slick when it rains and it is located in a wind tunnel running between the two mountain ranges around it that if they have high winds after a rain they actually slide pretty easy - think those sliders you buy to put under furniture to make it slide like glass.

Offline flowers

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Re: Mysterious Sliding Rocks in Death Valley
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2013, 11:34:43 AM »
I've been watching the History Channel - How the Earth Formed - series.  I recommend it to everyone... anyway, two weeks ago they did the sliding rocks. A NPS official keeps track of their movement with GPS. The theory is because the ground is so slick when it rains and it is located in a wind tunnel running between the two mountain ranges around it that if they have high winds after a rain they actually slide pretty easy - think those sliders you buy to put under furniture to make it slide like glass.
Hmmmmm? 

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Offline Oceander

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Re: Mysterious Sliding Rocks in Death Valley
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2013, 12:05:22 AM »
I've been watching the History Channel - How the Earth Formed - series.  I recommend it to everyone... anyway, two weeks ago they did the sliding rocks. A NPS official keeps track of their movement with GPS. The theory is because the ground is so slick when it rains and it is located in a wind tunnel running between the two mountain ranges around it that if they have high winds after a rain they actually slide pretty easy - think those sliders you buy to put under furniture to make it slide like glass.

Actually, think of a glass full of icy water - like the short glasses they (used to) serve in every diner - sitting on a flat formica counter in warm weather.  As the condensation on the outside of the glass forms and pools at the bottom of the glass, the glass will move with the slightest touch - not far or fast, but it will move - and if the counter happens to have a bit of a tilt to it, the glass may slide a very short distance by itself if it's jarred by something like the front door of the diner slamming shut (even if you can't feel any sort of shaking from the door slamming, there are actually vibrations from that which can travel a bit of a distance).

Offline flowers

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Re: Mysterious Sliding Rocks in Death Valley
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2013, 10:27:42 AM »
Actually, think of a glass full of icy water - like the short glasses they (used to) serve in every diner - sitting on a flat formica counter in warm weather.  As the condensation on the outside of the glass forms and pools at the bottom of the glass, the glass will move with the slightest touch - not far or fast, but it will move - and if the counter happens to have a bit of a tilt to it, the glass may slide a very short distance by itself if it's jarred by something like the front door of the diner slamming shut (even if you can't feel any sort of shaking from the door slamming, there are actually vibrations from that which can travel a bit of a distance).
OK, but I was under the impression it didn't rain much in Death Valley?

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Offline Oceander

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Re: Mysterious Sliding Rocks in Death Valley
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2013, 11:59:27 AM »
OK, but I was under the impression it didn't rain much in Death Valley?

****cute kitty

Very fine dust might accomplish the same end - just my un(der)educated guess.  Not all dust is the same, but I do know that very fine graphite dust, for example, is used as a lubricant.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2013, 11:59:57 AM by Oceander »

Offline flowers

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Re: Mysterious Sliding Rocks in Death Valley
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2013, 12:08:46 PM »
Very fine dust might accomplish the same end - just my un(der)educated guess.  Not all dust is the same, but I do know that very fine graphite dust, for example, is used as a lubricant.
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