Author Topic: Newborn names of fame  (Read 901 times)

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Offline mountaineer

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Newborn names of fame
« on: May 21, 2013, 04:23:01 PM »
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Offline truth_seeker

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Re: Newborn names of fame
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2013, 05:07:43 PM »
Short term "thinking" by people who have babies out of wedlock, tat and pierce their bodies, and give kids names that will seem goofy as all get-out, two decades later.

Why not go highbrow, historical?

Their are many spellings around the world for traditional and biblical names. Why not those?

Steven, Stephen, Stefan, Steffen, Esteban, etc? Francesca, Frances, Francine, Franca, etc.?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steven

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francesca
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Offline Lipstick on a Hillary

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Re: Newborn names of fame
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2013, 05:11:34 PM »
I kind of thought old-timey names were coming back into vogue? I've heard of some Allegras (had a great great aunt by that name)  Olive (Julia Roberts' daughter) and Charlotte (my grandmother, and then my grand niece's name).

Offline Oceander

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Re: Newborn names of fame
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2013, 10:47:14 PM »
I've got two absolute winners for you - keep in mind, I feel rather sorry for the poor kids themselves, but hopefully they'll learn to adjust as they grow up.  When I first heard the names on the playground I used to take my daughter to I didn't believe I'd heard them correctly until my wife confirmed it:  brother and sister, his name is Seven and her name is Natural.

Yup.

No doubt the boy will elide his name into Sven at some point (sounds sorta cool, much better than Seven) and the girl?  probably something like Nat, short for Natalie.

Offline Cincinnatus

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Re: Newborn names of fame
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2013, 11:15:35 PM »
Also evidently viewed as good role models like Jolie: presidents

When I was in college, lo these many years ago, I knew a guy, a history major, who named his son Lyndon Baines Johnson (last name forgotten).

One of my daughters is named "Brianna" which was rather unique at the time, about 25 years ago, now there are "Briannas", "Brianas", "Breannas", etc., all over the landscape.
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Offline TheMom

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Re: Newborn names of fame
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2013, 12:17:28 AM »
I'll never understand name a child after a celebrity (or the same name as a celebrities child).

Our grandson's name is Kaiden.  When I first heard the name I thought it was kinda unique, but know it seems that every other boy toddler shares his name.

The gran girls are named Zoey and Nora ~ good old fashion normal names.

Among different friends of our son, they named their sons Slade and Vegas.
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Offline mountaineer

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Re: Newborn names of fame
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2013, 08:03:12 AM »
Naming a child "Seven" probably was inspired by a "Seinfeld" episode, where George Costanza says he would give his child that name, then he gets upset when some friends decide to use it. I know of a family with a very common surname, so the girls are Destanee and Ambrosia.
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Offline Oceander

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Re: Newborn names of fame
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2013, 08:18:03 PM »
Naming a child "Seven" probably was inspired by a "Seinfeld" episode, where George Costanza says he would give his child that name, then he gets upset when some friends decide to use it. I know of a family with a very common surname, so the girls are Destanee and Ambrosia.

The Seinfeld link is the general consensus.

Offline TheMom

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Re: Newborn names of fame
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2013, 08:57:21 PM »
Naming a child "Seven" probably was inspired by a "Seinfeld" episode, where George Costanza says he would give his child that name, then he gets upset when some friends decide to use it.

Or from Married With Children.
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Offline Lipstick on a Hillary

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Re: Newborn names of fame
« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2013, 08:42:24 AM »
I just read another dumb name on FB:  Cadance

 




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Offline mountaineer

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Re: Newborn names of fame
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2013, 03:16:27 PM »
Yeah, lots of chilluns named Caden or Cayden around here. Also Jayden and Hayden.  :pondering:
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Offline jmyrlefuller

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Re: Newborn names of fame
« Reply #11 on: May 28, 2013, 09:36:27 PM »
Yeah, lots of chilluns named Caden or Cayden around here. Also Jayden and Hayden.  :pondering:
Kaden, Hayden, Braden, Jaden, Raiddan, Aden, banana-fana-fo-Faden, me-mi-mo-Maden... it seems like half the boys these days have names that rhyme with "aden" some way or another. Even in general, a lot of names that end in N-- Gannon, Colton, etc.


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