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Online mystery-ak

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« on: April 25, 2013, 09:10:18 AM »

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Online mountaineer

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« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2013, 01:35:50 PM »
Quote
"I'm living check by check," Esly Hernandez, a Dunkin' Donuts employee, said in a telephone interview. Hernandez, who said he makes minimum wage and has worked at Dunkin' for almost a year, was protesting outside a Subway store in the Loop. At least 200 workers participated in the strike, the group said.

"I'm not even able to save money because I have to pay the bills," said Hernandez, 24, who's trying to save money for his 4-year-old son. "You have to increase the low wage."
Some thoughts:  get a second job and don't make babies you can't afford to support.

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Offline Relic

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« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2013, 01:41:03 PM »
Some thoughts:  get a second job and don't make babies you can't afford to support.

And the rot of our country continues. Here you have a 24 year old man who somehow thinks he should be able to raise a family AND save money, working at Dunkin' Donuts.

Offline Cincinnatus

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« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2013, 01:56:20 PM »
And the rot of our country continues. Here you have a 24 year old man who somehow thinks he should be able to raise a family AND save money, working at Dunkin' Donuts.

Yes, I would like to have some background on this fellow. Did he complete high school? Go on to college at all? Does he have a criminal record, even a minor one? Why, at 24 with a 4 year old child, is he working at a Dunkin' Donuts?
We shall never be abandoned by Heaven while we act worthy of its aid ~~ Samuel Adams

Offline massadvj

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« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2013, 02:40:38 PM »
Personally, I do not take issue with people who wish to pressure employers by walking of the job and demanding what they want.  It is their perfect right.  It's also the right of the employer to fire their asses and hire someone else.  That's the beauty of free enterprise.  If the employer can't find alternative labor at the price he is paying, then tactics such as these might work.  Otherwise, they'll backfire.  Either way, it should not be society's problem.
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Online jmyrlefuller

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« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2013, 05:11:15 PM »
First off, they need to understand that labor is a commodity. Its value goes up and down on the market based on supply and demand. A worker cannot simply demand his work is worth $15 an hour because he wants it to be any more than a farmer demand his milk is worth $5 a gallon because he wants it to be. If no one is willing to buy, he has to bring his price down or get out of the business. The market for labor is crap right now and has been for the past five years.

Part of the reason for that is because labor is not as valuable as it used to be. Automation, offshoring, and other less expensive solutions reduce the need for it, and government efforts to prop up the price of labor (such as the minimum wage and the looming Obamacare employer mandate) put American labor at a distinct disadvantage to these lower-cost solutions. Efforts to try and move more people into white-collar, college-educated careers have created a glut in labor supply in those fields as well, which creates an especially troubling situation given the mass amount of upfront investment required to enter those fields. Those fields were never intended to house the majority of American workers.

Second, in order for labor to be valuable, it has to be worthwhile to the employer so that he does not lose money. In order for a company to want to pay an employee $15 an hour, he has to be sure that the employee can bring in enough money to make up that $15 an hour in extra sales, and on a consistent basis. In retail, that is not always possible.

I would suggest to these city workers to go out into the rural farm areas and start working on the farms. It's hard work, but the cost of living is far less out there, and as long as there are mouths to feed, there will always be a need to grow the food to feed those mouths. Every American we can put to work there will reduce our need for foreign labor.


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