Author Topic: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage  (Read 46340 times)

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Offline pookie18

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #50 on: June 04, 2016, 12:22:22 PM »
I would think you would need to search the immigration records of England for that period. There is information at the link I posted for you as to how to do that.

Was going to print the entire contents of the link here & ask what related to England's immigration records, but maybe it would be easier if you posted the relevant part of your link here...tx

Online Bigun

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #51 on: June 04, 2016, 12:33:45 PM »
Was going to print the entire contents of the link here & ask what related to England's immigration records, but maybe it would be easier if you posted the relevant part of your link here...tx

The part surrounding this:


Offline truth_seeker

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #52 on: June 04, 2016, 12:38:25 PM »
Pretty interesting.  Transitioning from names and dates to historical context is a good thing.  I did that too, and yet come back from time to time to the names and dates as new information comes my way.  Do you match anyone in the DNA database that also has Indian blood?  It likely can't go back farther much than the 1700s.  Are there any suspect locations such as areas in or near reservations where your ancestors might have lived?  If you could possibly get it to a tribe, many of them have excellent databases.  That would really send me into search-land, lol.
Plenty of potential contact with Indians, dating back to mid 1600s in New England, later Virginia, North and South Carolina, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, etc.

Also my ancestors were in the West as part of the Mormon migration 1847, the Gold Rush 1849, etc.

But only 4% Indigenous North American can be an error. Not really that important, and it is unlikely I will ever track it down. I know who my people were, and where they lived.

I have a completed family tree going back several generations, with a couple of dead ends. Like for example a lady with the surname of "Roberts" which dead ends. That is a Welsh surname, but maybe she was part Indian.

Being part Indian wasn't a big advantage, so if it could be minimized/ignored/denied was better. It could be on either side or on both. We tested out 91 year old mother, to see if it is on her side. Expect results shortly.

I have studied DNA enough, to know the British Isles are an old melting pot, as far as physical racial ancestry goes. Many British share ancestry with Spain.

My wife is 100% Italian. Yet her mother is very tall, and has "Viking's disease" in her hands. Vikings went to Southern Italy 1000 years ago.

Etc.
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Online catfish1957

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #53 on: June 04, 2016, 12:48:46 PM »
The part surrounding this:



Just a reminder to Briefers that most of the Immigration and Travel section at Ancestry is their top tier of service $299/yr (international) vs. $189/yr for U.S only.  I personally can get by at my house with US tier only.  Full service is available on the Library  Subscription Service offered by Ancestry that is available at most decent (big shock) genealogy libraries.
I display the Confederate Battle Flag in honor of my great great great grandfathers who spilled blood at Wilson's Creek and Shiloh.  5 others served in the WBTS with honor too.

Offline pookie18

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #54 on: June 04, 2016, 12:57:01 PM »
The part surrounding this:



Oh, that. I did that years ago (& again recently), but didn't find them under UK incoming passenger lists. I do have the Ancestry International subscription (since I share it with 3 other folks).

Online Bigun

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #55 on: June 04, 2016, 01:09:58 PM »
Oh, that. I did that years ago (& again recently), but didn't find them under UK incoming passenger lists. I do have the Ancestry International subscription (since I share it with 3 other folks).

OK. I wasn't sure as to where you were.

The link I provided also has links to many other possible places to search for that kind of information.

Are you sure that the people you are looking for were ever legal residents of England?

Offline pookie18

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #56 on: June 04, 2016, 02:03:53 PM »
OK. I wasn't sure as to where you were.

The link I provided also has links to many other possible places to search for that kind of information.

Are you sure that the people you are looking for were ever legal residents of England?

Legal meaning citizens? If so, not sure. However, they were there from c. 1892 to 1908 & I have birth & death certificates, school rosters, etc.,  from London for several of them. Didn't see anything in those other links specifically...which is why I had to ask where I was supposed to be looking...thanks.

Online Bigun

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #57 on: June 04, 2016, 02:56:05 PM »
Legal meaning citizens? If so, not sure. However, they were there from c. 1892 to 1908 & I have birth & death certificates, school rosters, etc.,  from London for several of them. Didn't see anything in those other links specifically...which is why I had to ask where I was supposed to be looking...thanks.

I don't know what else I can  point you to.  If they stayed in England for that long there are paper records somewhere. Just have to find them. Check all possible permeations of the names for sure.

Offline EC

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #58 on: June 04, 2016, 08:31:13 PM »
Was going to print the entire contents of the link here & ask what related to England's immigration records, but maybe it would be easier if you posted the relevant part of your link here...tx

You are in luck - slightly. Since a child was born here, that you know of, after 1860, their birth certificate will be in the archives, which will include the parent's parish. If no parish is recorded, they arrived within 6 months of the date of issue of the birth certificate. That certainly trims down the records search.

https://www.somersethouse.org.uk/contact/public-records

It's no longer held at Somerset House (they sold off the building to developers  :shrug: ) but that link gives you where to ask and how.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2016, 08:33:14 PM by EC »
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Offline pookie18

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #59 on: June 04, 2016, 10:40:09 PM »
You are in luck - slightly. Since a child was born here, that you know of, after 1860, their birth certificate will be in the archives, which will include the parent's parish. If no parish is recorded, they arrived within 6 months of the date of issue of the birth certificate. That certainly trims down the records search.

https://www.somersethouse.org.uk/contact/public-records

It's no longer held at Somerset House (they sold off the building to developers  :shrug: ) but that link gives you where to ask and how.

Thanks, @EC! Will PM you on Sunday...

Offline mountaineer

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #60 on: June 05, 2016, 01:37:39 PM »
Excellent list!  I have personal accounts at both Ancestry and Family Search.  I also use Family Tree DNA (it's the best there is) for DNA testing and GEDmatch.com for comparing my dna with that of others.
Thanks for that testimonial. I've been thinking of doing a DNA test. I know of my Anglo ancestry, and possibly Danish, but thought it would be interesting to see what else was "in the mix." My husband's four grandparents all came to America from present-day Croatia (they were Serbs), and he's worked on his genealogy for years. Nevertheless, it also might be interesting to find any non-Serb blood in him!
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Online Bigun

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #61 on: June 05, 2016, 02:50:04 PM »
Thanks for that testimonial. I've been thinking of doing a DNA test. I know of my Anglo ancestry, and possibly Danish, but thought it would be interesting to see what else was "in the mix." My husband's four grandparents all came to America from present-day Croatia (they were Serbs), and he's worked on his genealogy for years. Nevertheless, it also might be interesting to find any non-Serb blood in him!

As I am sure you are aware, there are different kinds of DNA tests.

Anyone can do an autosomal which is useful for finding your ethnicity and those who share a similar DNA profile. Ladies can also do a mitochondrial test. and men can do a Y test.

The reasons why one might choose to do any of those are well explained at the link below.

https://dna-explained.com/2012/10/01/4-kinds-of-dna-for-genetic-genealogy/


Offline musiclady

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #62 on: June 05, 2016, 03:07:14 PM »
As I am sure you are aware, there are different kinds of DNA tests.

Anyone can do an autosomal which is useful for finding your ethnicity and those who share a similar DNA profile. Ladies can also do a mitochondrial test. and men can do a Y test.

The reasons why one might choose to do any of those are well explained at the link below.

https://dna-explained.com/2012/10/01/4-kinds-of-dna-for-genetic-genealogy/

I'm 100% Swedish - all grandparents were born there, and have traced back to the 18th century, again all in Sweden, though one was born in what is Finland today but was part of Sweden at the time.

I did a DNA test through ancestry.com and they came up with the obvious results.  The percentages are averages, and I came out 51% Scandinavian, which could be as high as 70%.  The rest were parts of German, Western Russian, Finnish and north western European.

One thing I found helpful, in addition to materials about tracing Swedish roots here, was the Swedish-American Immigration Center in Karlstad, Varmland, Sweden.  We spent about two hours there, and they came up with loads of details from the Lutheran Church records of my grandparents, great-grandparents, and great-great grandparents.

We were able to visit the birthplaces of all 4 grandparents and 8 great-grandparents, and even see the large farm than my maternal great-grandfather farmed, and the Iron mine where my paternal great-grandfather worked, and where he decided he wanted more opportunity, so decided to come to America.

One thing that was remarkable to me while I was there, is how much I felt "home".................. like I was among my people.

I've always been 100% American, but my roots have been strong in Sweden, and I guess my internal DNA knew that.   ^-^
« Last Edit: June 05, 2016, 03:08:08 PM by musiclady »
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Online Bigun

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #63 on: June 05, 2016, 03:11:32 PM »
I'm 100% Swedish - all grandparents were born there, and have traced back to the 18th century, again all in Sweden, though one was born in what is Finland today but was part of Sweden at the time.

I did a DNA test through ancestry.com and they came up with the obvious results.  The percentages are averages, and I came out 51% Scandinavian, which could be as high as 70%.  The rest were parts of German, Western Russian, Finnish and north western European.

One thing I found helpful, in addition to materials about tracing Swedish roots here, was the Swedish-American Immigration Center in Karlstad, Varmland, Sweden.  We spent about two hours there, and they came up with loads of details from the Lutheran Church records of my grandparents, great-grandparents, and great-great grandparents.

We were able to visit the birthplaces of all 4 grandparents and 8 great-grandparents, and even see the large farm than my maternal great-grandfather farmed, and the Iron mine where my paternal great-grandfather worked, and where he decided he wanted more opportunity, so decided to come to America.

One thing that was remarkable to me while I was there, is how much I felt "home".................. like I was among my people.

I've always been 100% American, but my roots have been strong in Sweden, and I guess my internal DNA knew that.   ^-^

I know what you mean!  I have had a similar experience in fact.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2016, 04:28:05 PM by Bigun »

Offline jmyrlefuller

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #64 on: June 05, 2016, 04:21:25 PM »
The Fuller family came here from England on a Puritan ship in the 1630s.

My paternal grandmother came here from Poland as a child and, judging by maiden name alone, probably had some Czech ancestry as well.

My maternal great-grandfather came here from Ireland. His wife was part of Chautauqua County's Swedish ancestry.

To be honest, I've never really cared about doing a DNA test for it. I know I'm about as white as they come, though, and that's all I need to know.
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Online catfish1957

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #65 on: June 06, 2016, 09:09:28 AM »
The Fuller family came here from England on a Puritan ship in the 1630s.


1/16 of my ancestry is MA/CT puritans too.  Remember seeing an NEHGS study showing people with common ancestry to the Winthrop Fleet migration have an 85-90% probability of common ancestry on those Winthrop lines.
I display the Confederate Battle Flag in honor of my great great great grandfathers who spilled blood at Wilson's Creek and Shiloh.  5 others served in the WBTS with honor too.

Offline Elderberry

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #66 on: June 09, 2016, 09:12:42 AM »
1/16 of my ancestry is MA/CT puritans too.  Remember seeing an NEHGS study showing people with common ancestry to the Winthrop Fleet migration have an 85-90% probability of common ancestry on those Winthrop lines.

This thread has sparked my interest to get back to researching my tree. I had mentioned joining SAR and SCV. Well Today I submitted two preliminary review forms to the General Society of Mayflower Descendants as I have two Mayflower Compact Signatories in my tree; Edward Doty and Frances Cooke.
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Offline mountaineer

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #67 on: June 09, 2016, 09:15:30 AM »
Is anyone concerned about what might happen to your DNA samples? I guess it's hard to trust anyone, at a time when google, Facebook, et al., seem to be handmaidens for the Zero Administration.
"Because men have lost the objective basis of certainty of knowledge of the thing in which they are working, more and more I fear we are going to find them manipulating science according to their own sociological or political desires rather than standing upon concrete objectivity." Francis A. Schaeffer

Online catfish1957

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #68 on: June 09, 2016, 12:29:40 PM »
This thread has sparked my interest to get back to researching my tree. I had mentioned joining SAR and SCV. Well Today I submitted two preliminary review forms to the General Society of Mayflower Descendants as I have two Mayflower Compact Signatories in my tree; Edward Doty and Frances Cooke.

New England has some absolutely awesome records.  With my  particular New England great great grandfather, I have traced 113/128 of his ancestors back to England and Scotland.  over 90%!!!!!   However, they all came over on boats 3- 100+ (1628-1660).  not a single one to the Mayflower.  :(
I display the Confederate Battle Flag in honor of my great great great grandfathers who spilled blood at Wilson's Creek and Shiloh.  5 others served in the WBTS with honor too.

Online catfish1957

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #69 on: June 09, 2016, 12:35:43 PM »
Is anyone concerned about what might happen to your DNA samples? I guess it's hard to trust anyone, at a time when google, Facebook, et al., seem to be handmaidens for the Zero Administration.

As long as you are a law abiding citizen, there should never be a problem.  Can't speak for 23/Me, but FTDNA and Ancestry have confidentiality agreements that protect participants against anyone wanting information.  I believe there the only exception is cases where law enforcement has "for cause" reason to secure.  And that has to be in the form of subpoena.   Even with that, FTDNA/Ancestry do their best to only provide the minimal.

In my case, at almost age 60, the benefits of being able to knock down genealogical brick walls is worth the minimal risk.
I display the Confederate Battle Flag in honor of my great great great grandfathers who spilled blood at Wilson's Creek and Shiloh.  5 others served in the WBTS with honor too.

Offline jmyrlefuller

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #70 on: June 09, 2016, 07:28:36 PM »
Is anyone concerned about what might happen to your DNA samples? I guess it's hard to trust anyone, at a time when google, Facebook, et al., seem to be handmaidens for the Zero Administration.
Yes, that's part of the reason why my family refuses to do anything like that.
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Offline NavyCanDo

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #71 on: June 09, 2016, 08:36:33 PM »
Thanks for setting up this page. 

In the late 1990s, I got into a genealogy hobby, as I started tracing my Irish family roots.  It's a great (albeit time-consuming) pastime!

It use to be largely older women that would take on the genealogy hobby, and to do a good job it would take a lot of letter writting, because there was no enternet to do your search. With the web, and the many good genealogy web sights, the hobby has spread to husbands and children too. I have traced my family roots back to the eleventh century on both sides of the family. Thankfully my family lines kept great records. 

Scots-Irish and English with earlier Norman ties on my Dad's side, and German, Swede  on my mothers.
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Online Bigun

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #72 on: June 09, 2016, 08:44:27 PM »
Is anyone concerned about what might happen to your DNA samples? I guess it's hard to trust anyone, at a time when google, Facebook, et al., seem to be handmaidens for the Zero Administration.

Not in the least!

Offline NavyCanDo

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #73 on: June 09, 2016, 08:46:02 PM »
Is anyone concerned about what might happen to your DNA samples? I guess it's hard to trust anyone, at a time when google, Facebook, et al., seem to be handmaidens for the Zero Administration.

That was my first concern when a geaneolgy  group researching my sir name "Glenn"  were discussing my link to one of three branches of early American Glenns.  Having a male member of my line provide dna would solve some roadblocks they ran into. They paid the dna test which was around $200. There was no problems, and I still converse with the ladies in that group.  Old ladies in case MRS Navycando reads this.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2016, 08:46:39 PM by NavyCanDo »
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Online catfish1957

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #74 on: June 22, 2016, 01:35:24 PM »
Catfish Tip No. 3-  Find A Grave

Maybe the most exciting genealogy development of the past 5 years has been the use and expansion of the Findagrave web site.

http://www.findagrave.com

There are now over 148,000,000 graves cataloged on this site, and in many cases there is information about our  ancestors on these stones that  can't be found in other places.  The search engine is very user friendly, and many kind volunteers have took and posted pictures of the stones.  Site also has an easy and effective linking system which with one click will take you to that person's parents, spouse, or children.

Many other helpful folks also post pictures of the people associated with the grave, and there is a "flowers" section , where you can provide memorial comments, or any other bit of info to share.  Finally, if there isn't a picture of the stone of your ancestor, you can easily ask one of an army of volunteers, who would be happy to post a photo of the stone onto your ancestors memorial page.

I know probably 90%+ of you in this hobby are already using and enjoying this site, I did want to make sure the other 10% were made aware of it.  It is totally free, but does allow you to buy Grave bucks to donate to the site so you can sponsor your ancestor's page.  If you haven't tried it, it is well worth it.
I display the Confederate Battle Flag in honor of my great great great grandfathers who spilled blood at Wilson's Creek and Shiloh.  5 others served in the WBTS with honor too.


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