Author Topic: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage  (Read 46165 times)

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Offline Elderberry

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #300 on: November 06, 2018, 07:54:57 PM »
Family tree of 400 million people shows genetics has limited influence on longevity

Genetics Society of America by Sarah Bay 11/6/2018

Although long life tends to run in families, genetics has far less influence on life span than previously estimated, according to a new analysis published in GENETICS.  Ruby et al. used a data set of over 400 million historical persons obtained from public pedigrees on Ancestry.com to estimate the heritability of life span, finding it to be well below 10%.

“We can potentially learn many things about the biology of aging from human genetics, but if the heritability of life span is low it tempers our expectations about what types of things we can learn and how easy it will be,” says lead author Graham Ruby (Calico Life Sciences). “It helps contextualize the questions that scientists studying aging can effectively ask.”

Calico Life Sciences is a research and development company whose mission is to understand the fundamental science of aging. So how did Calico get involved with Ancestry, the online genealogy resource?

“We wanted to get a sense for the contribution of genetics to life span, and that’s something you can study using pedigrees,” says Ruby. With millions of members, Ancestry has no shortage of pedigrees.

Fortuitously, researchers at Calico and Ancestry were connected from their time in academic basic research. Calico’s Chief Scientific Officer David Botstein and Ancestry’s Chief Scientific Officer Catherine Ball (senior author on the GENETICS paper) both have backgrounds in yeast research. They were involved in the Saccharomyces Genome Database project during their times at Stanford University and published a number of papers together.

So researchers from both companies teamed up to use publicly available pedigree data from Ancestry.com to approach the problem of figuring out the genetic contributions to human longevity.

“Partnering with Ancestry allowed this new study to gain deeper insights by using a much larger data set than any previous studies of longevity,” says Ball.

More: http://genestogenomes.org/family-tree/
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Offline kevindavis

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #301 on: November 22, 2018, 09:51:44 AM »
I don't know if any has tried this site yet or not, check out MyHeritage it is a decent site.

Also, I met someone from Germany (Baden-Württemberg) who is a distant relative of mine.
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Offline Bigun

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #302 on: November 22, 2018, 09:58:54 AM »
I don't know if any has tried this site yet or not, check out MyHeritage it is a decent site.

Also, I met someone from Germany (Baden-Württemberg) who is a distant relative of mine.

I have an account there but find the site too hard to navigate. Much prefer Ancestry or Family Search.

Offline skeeter

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #303 on: November 22, 2018, 10:14:26 AM »
I have an account there but find the site too hard to navigate. Much prefer Ancestry or Family Search.

I'm upset with MyHeritage for including a small slice of Neanderthal in my genealogical background.

Offline kevindavis

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #304 on: November 22, 2018, 12:42:23 PM »
I have an account there but find the site too hard to navigate. Much prefer Ancestry or Family Search.


I understand what you mean, but I like the SmartMatch feature they have.
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Offline truth_seeker

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #305 on: January 20, 2019, 10:26:10 PM »
Twins get some 'mystifying' results when they put 5 DNA ancestry kits to the test
 
Chief geneticist at a popular ancestry company admits it's 'kind of a science and an art'

Charlsie Agro, Luke Denne · CBC News · Posted: Jan 18, 2019 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: January 18

snip

One set of identical twins, two different ancestry profiles.
At least that's the suggestion from one of the world's largest ancestry DNA testing companies.
Last spring, Marketplace host Charlsie Agro and her twin sister, Carly, bought home kits from AncestryDNA, MyHeritage, 23andMe, FamilyTreeDNA and Living DNA, and mailed samples of their DNA to each company for analysis.

snip

My sister and I have considered this for awhile. My results from two compnies. My mother and her, with Ancestry.

Anyway this article hints at the answer; the origin redictions, are subject to several variables, not the least of which is it id fairly new science.


One company I tested with is "Living DNA," a British-centric firm. To them most everything is British.

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Offline Smokin Joe

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #306 on: January 20, 2019, 10:47:00 PM »
Twins get some 'mystifying' results when they put 5 DNA ancestry kits to the test
 
Chief geneticist at a popular ancestry company admits it's 'kind of a science and an art'

Charlsie Agro, Luke Denne · CBC News · Posted: Jan 18, 2019 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: January 18

snip

One set of identical twins, two different ancestry profiles.
At least that's the suggestion from one of the world's largest ancestry DNA testing companies.
Last spring, Marketplace host Charlsie Agro and her twin sister, Carly, bought home kits from AncestryDNA, MyHeritage, 23andMe, FamilyTreeDNA and Living DNA, and mailed samples of their DNA to each company for analysis.

snip

My sister and I have considered this for awhile. My results from two compnies. My mother and her, with Ancestry.

Anyway this article hints at the answer; the origin redictions, are subject to several variables, not the least of which is it id fairly new science.


One company I tested with is "Living DNA," a British-centric firm. To them most everything is British.
Link, please? I'd like to read the whole thing.
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Offline kevindavis

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #307 on: April 28, 2019, 06:04:01 PM »
Well I just took the Ancestry DNA test. I'll let you know in a few weeks when I get the results.
"If we die, we want people to accept it. We're in a risky business, and we hope that if anything happens to us it will not delay the program. The conquest of space is worth the risk of life."

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Offline mountaineer

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #308 on: April 28, 2019, 06:07:54 PM »
I've been going nuts on ancestry lately,  and just learned yesterday my 8x great grandmother was executed in Salem,  Mass., in 1692 after her conviction on witchcraft charges! Yikes.
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Offline Gefn

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #309 on: April 28, 2019, 06:54:35 PM »
Two people in this month told me to go to 23 and me.

I still think for me it’s a bad idea. Why open a box I shouldn’t open!
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Offline Elderberry

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #310 on: April 28, 2019, 07:08:53 PM »
I had my DNA tested at Family Tree. In addition to the Autosomal test I also had the Y-DNA test. Now on the Y-DNA test results, three men were identified as a very close match to me. The closest common ancestor was estimated to live sometime around the 1600s. What is most interesting is that we all have different last names. That common ancestor sure did get around.
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Offline Elderberry

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #311 on: April 28, 2019, 07:23:12 PM »
I've been going nuts on ancestry lately,  and just learned yesterday my 8x great grandmother was executed in Salem,  Mass., in 1692 after her conviction on witchcraft charges! Yikes.

Years ago I spent too much time on Ancestry.  One of my ancestors I discovered was my 29th great grandmother, (Lady) Godiva, Countess of Mercia.

Dig enough and you'll never know who you'll come across.
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Offline Elderberry

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #312 on: April 30, 2019, 08:26:31 AM »
Italians try to crack Leonardo da Vinci DNA code with lock of hair

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/apr/29/italy-leonardo-da-vinci-dna-lock-of-artists-hair-test-remains-french-grave

The Guardian  by Angela Giuffrida Mon 29 Apr 2019

Quote
Hair tagged as polymath’s in US collection to be tested against remains in French grave

Two Italian experts are set to perform a DNA test on a lock of hair that they say might have belonged to Leonardo da Vinci.

The hair strand was found in a private collection in the US and will go on display for the first time at the Ideale Leonardo da Vinci museum in Vinci (the Tuscan town where the artist was born), from 2 May, the 500th anniversary of the artist’s death.

“We found, across the Atlantic, a lock of hair historically tagged ‘Les Cheveux de Leonardo da Vinci’ and this extraordinary relic will allow us to proceed in the quest to carry out research on Da Vinci’s DNA,” said Alessandro Vezzosi, the director of the museum and Agnese Sabato, president of the Leonardo da Vinci Heritage Foundation in a statement.

The lock will also be presented at a press conference at Leonardiana library in Vinci on Thursday as year-long celebrations get underway in Italy, France and elsewhere to commemorate the artist.

More at link.
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Offline Gefn

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #313 on: April 30, 2019, 12:51:59 PM »
Years ago I spent too much time on Ancestry.  One of my ancestors I discovered was my 29th great grandmother, (Lady) Godiva, Countess of Mercia.

Dig enough and you'll never know who you'll come across.

That is incredibly neat.
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Offline truth_seeker

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #314 on: April 30, 2019, 02:21:53 PM »
I await the news release, when a major DNA entity announces the Neanderthal content for particular Haplogroups.

http://humanorigins.si.edu/evidence/human-fossils/species/homo-heidelbergensis

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Offline truth_seeker

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #315 on: April 30, 2019, 02:45:36 PM »
A few years back I found this site, with interesting content. Haplogroups, maps, etc.

They have a mobile app as well. As with most sites, a small number of "experts" seem todominate the volume of activity.

Eupedia

https://www.eupedia.com/genetics/
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Offline Elderberry

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #316 on: April 30, 2019, 02:57:54 PM »
I await the news release, when a major DNA entity announces the Neanderthal content for particular Haplogroups.

http://humanorigins.si.edu/evidence/human-fossils/species/homo-heidelbergensis

https://customercare.23andme.com/hc/en-us/articles/212873707-Neanderthal-Report-Basics
Quote
Neanderthal Report Basics

The Neanderthal Ancestry report provides information about how much of your ancestry can be traced back to the Neanderthals. The analysis includes the review of over 2,000 genetic variants of known Neanderthal origin that are scattered across the genome.

Neanderthals were a group of ancient humans who lived in Europe and Western Asia, and are the closest evolutionary relatives of modern humans. They went extinct about 40,000 years ago, after living alongside modern humans - Homo sapiens - for thousands of years. As a result, evidence of Neanderthal DNA is now found in traces in nearly all modern humans.

With the Neanderthal Ancestry report, you can view the amount of Neanderthal variants you have compared to all 23andMe customers worldwide.
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Offline Elderberry

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #317 on: April 30, 2019, 03:11:35 PM »
Y chromosome genes from Neanderthals likely extinct in modern men

http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2016/04/modern-men-lack-y-chromosome-genes-from-neanderthals.html

Quote
The Neanderthal counterpart of the human Y chromosome, or male sex chromosome, appears to have died out. Why this happened is up for debate.

Although it’s widely known that modern humans carry traces of Neanderthal DNA, a new international study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine suggests that Neanderthal Y-chromosome genes disappeared from the human genome long ago.

The study was published April 7 in The American Journal of Human Genetics, in English and in Spanish, and will be available to view for free. The senior author is Carlos Bustamante, PhD, professor of biomedical data science and of genetics at the School of Medicine, and the lead author is Fernando Mendez, PhD, a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford.

The Y chromosome is one of two human sex chromosomes. Unlike the X chromosome, the Y chromosome is passed exclusively from father to son. This is the first study to examine a Neanderthal Y chromosome, Mendez said. Previous studies sequenced DNA from the fossils of Neanderthal women or from mitochondrial DNA, which is passed to children of either sex from their mother.

Other research has shown that the DNA of modern humans is from 2.5 to 4 percent Neanderthal DNA, a legacy of breeding between modern humans and Neanderthals 50,000 years ago. As a result, the team was excited to find that, unlike other kinds of DNA, the Neanderthal Y chromosome DNA was apparently not passed to modern humans during this time.

“We’ve never observed the Neanderthal Y chromosome DNA in any human sample ever tested,” Bustamante said. “That doesn’t prove it’s totally extinct, but it likely is.”

Why no Neanderthal DNA?

Why is not yet clear. The Neanderthal Y chromosome genes could have simply drifted out of the human gene pool by chance over the millennia. Another possibility, said Mendez, is that Neanderthal Y chromosomes include genes that are incompatible with other human genes, and he and his colleagues have found evidence supporting this idea. Indeed, one of the Y chromosome genes that differ in Neanderthals has previously been implicated in transplant rejection when males donate organs to women.

“The functional nature of the mutations we found,” said Bustamante, “suggests to us that Neanderthal Y chromosome sequences may have played a role in barriers to gene flow, but we need to do experiments to demonstrate this and are working to plan these now.”

Several Neanderthal Y chromosome genes that differ from those in humans function as part of the immune system. Three are "minor histocompatibility antigens," or H-Y genes, which resemble the HLA antigens that transplant surgeons check to make sure that organ donors and organ recipients have similar immune profiles. Because these Neanderthal antigen genes are on the Y chromosome, they are specific to males.

Theoretically, said Mendez, a woman’s immune system might attack a male fetus carrying Neanderthal H-Y genes. If women consistently miscarried male babies carrying Neanderthal Y chromosomes, that would explain its absence in modern humans. So far this is just a hypothesis, but the immune systems of modern women are known to sometimes react to male offspring when there’s genetic incompatibility.

When did we part ways?

The Y chromosome data also shed new light on the timeline for the divergence of humans and Neanderthals. The human lineage diverged from other apes over several million years, ending as late as 4 million years ago. After the final split from other apes, the human lineage branched into a series of different types of humans, including separate lineages for Neanderthals and what are now modern humans.

Previous estimates based on mitochondrial DNA put the divergence of the human and Neanderthal lineages at between 400,000 and 800,000 years ago. The last common ancestor of Neanderthals and humans — based on the Y chromosome DNA sequenced in the study — is about 550,000 years ago. Scientists believe Neanderthals died out about 40,000 years ago.

Sequencing the Neanderthal Y chromosome may shed further light on the relationship between humans and Neanderthals. One challenge for the research team is to find out whether the Y chromosome Neanderthal gene variants identified were indeed incompatible with human genes.

The data for the study came from public gene sequencing databases. "We did not collect any data for this work," said Mendez. "It was all public data."
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Offline Sanguine

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Offline truth_seeker

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #319 on: April 30, 2019, 03:34:57 PM »
A History of Britain - The Humans Arrive (1 Million BC - 8000 BC)

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Offline Smokin Joe

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #320 on: May 03, 2019, 03:55:44 AM »
Years ago I spent too much time on Ancestry.  One of my ancestors I discovered was my 29th great grandmother, (Lady) Godiva, Countess of Mercia.

Dig enough and you'll never know who you'll come across.
We may well be (distantly) related.
How God must weep at humans' folly! Stand fast! God knows what he is doing!
Seventeen Techniques for Truth Suppression


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Offline Elderberry

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #321 on: May 21, 2019, 11:49:38 AM »
DNA test proves former care worker is entitled to £50m country estate

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/may/21/dna-test-proves-former-care-worker-entitled-50m-country-estate-cornwall



Quote
A former care worker has inherited a £50m country estate after a DNA test proved he was the son of its deceased owner.

Jordan Adlard Rogers, 31, found out his father was the aristocrat Charles Rogers after his death in 2018 and has now moved into the 1,536-acre Penrose estate in Cornwall, which his family has lived in for generations.

“I’m not going to forget where I’ve come from,” Adlard Rogers told CornwallLive. “I’ve been at the point of worrying about the next bill and have had a tough start in life but now I’m here I want to help people.”

He said he planned to set up a charity to help people living in nearby Porthleven and Helston.

More at link.
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Offline Elderberry

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #322 on: May 27, 2019, 01:29:43 PM »
Here is a SNP Tracker tool: http://scaledinnovation.com/gg/snpTracker.html

Here is the output when I input my Haplogroup, R-BY88844.



I have no idea how accurate it is.

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Offline kevindavis

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #323 on: May 27, 2019, 03:05:25 PM »
Well roughly June 10th I will find out my DNA results from Ancestry.
"If we die, we want people to accept it. We're in a risky business, and we hope that if anything happens to us it will not delay the program. The conquest of space is worth the risk of life."

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Offline truth_seeker

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Re: Genealogy - Getting to Know your Heritage
« Reply #324 on: May 27, 2019, 03:46:13 PM »
I have no idea how accurate it is.

If you have your DNA raw data, you can upload it to GedMatch, and run it against various databases (or reference data).
Well roughly June 10th I will find out my DNA results from Ancestry.


Do you also have extensive "paper" family tree geneology? Pedigree?


Note when you get those Ancestry results, you can also upload your data to Gedmatch.com



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